Zentrum für multimediales Lehren und Lernen (LLZ)
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Zentrum für multimediales Lehren und Lernen (LLZ)
E-Learning, E-Teaching, E-Assessment, E-Portfolio, Multimedia, OER, Datenschutz, Mobile Learning, E-Strategie, Implementierung, Social Media, ILIAS, Tools
Curated by LLZ Uni Halle
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The Free eBook: How Gamification Reshapes Learning

The Free eBook: How Gamification Reshapes Learning | Zentrum für multimediales Lehren und Lernen (LLZ) | Scoop.it
The Learning Professionals' Free Gamification eBook. Would you be interested in the Most Effective Uses of Gamification in Learning? In the Free How Gamification Reshapes Learning ebook you will find useful Gamification Tips provided by 23 Gamification professionals.

Via Christopher Pappas
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Christopher Pappas's curator insight, February 24, 2014 11:41 AM

The Free eBook: How Gamification Reshapes Learning

 

The Learning Professionals' Free Gamification eBook.

 

Would you be interested in the Most Effective Uses of Gamification in Learning? In the Free How Gamification Reshapes Learning ebook you will find useful Gamification Tips provided by 23 Gamification professionals.

 

http://elearningindustry.com/free-ebook-how-gamification-reshapes-learning

Valeria&Giorgia's curator insight, March 13, 2014 9:03 AM

Si possono trovare tantissime informazioni online che riguardano la gamification

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What Are the 7 Mind Frames of Learning?

What Are the 7 Mind Frames of Learning? | Zentrum für multimediales Lehren und Lernen (LLZ) | Scoop.it

'Learning thrives on error'

"Among all the influences that can make a profound difference in student learning is how we think about our role!  So, start with looking inward and ask about the mind frames you have as an educator. 

It is through these mind frames that we make decisions in the classroom and school, and it is argued that educators highly imbued with these mind frames are among the high impact educators."


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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, January 15, 2014 6:18 PM

Teachers need to recast themselves as learners alongside students. The days of the expert are behind us despite the advent of TED talks and other media where we still seem to think the sage on the stage is the way to impart knowledge, wisdom, and truth. There are moments for that, but learning is very relational, contingent, contextual, and personal.

Armando's curator insight, January 19, 2014 8:21 AM
What Are the 7 Mind Frames of Learning?
Terry Doherty's curator insight, January 27, 2014 5:48 PM

I like the approach of "walking in their shoes" to describe how educators effect an interest in learning.

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Standardized Achievement Tests: What Are They Good For?

Standardized Achievement Tests: What Are They Good For? | Zentrum für multimediales Lehren und Lernen (LLZ) | Scoop.it

 

" (...) It’s well known that good standardized test takers also tend to have high cognitive ability. That’s not a shocker.

But until recently, very little research has looked at the effect of improving standardized achievement test performance. This is obviously a really important question, since we are so steeped in a standardized testing culture. Wouldn’t it be nice to know what all this obsessive teaching to the test is really good for? (...)"

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, February 17, 2014 9:53 PM

Today we have students taking more and more standardized tests. This post shares information on "standardized test scores (Math and English language arts) and cognitive ability (working memory, processing speed, and abstract reasoning)" from ~1400 students 8th grade students in Boston (schools include traditional, exam and charter). 

The question I would ask is why are we focused on standardized tests? Is this the primary way we should assess our students? Do standardized tests become critical thinkers, creative thinkers? This list could go on.

The information in this post may surprise you and there are links to the original paper and supplement.

Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, February 18, 2014 5:11 AM

 I am concerned about the massive growth of standardized test as a tool to motivate learning and improvement in education. These also even seem to be an intimidation tool used against staff and school systems these days far more than an formative evaluation tool. The best evaluations for both formative and summative are by far real life performance based and the real process is always iterative and ongoing. That is everything in learning is iterative with exception of life and death training that must be passed by a 100% success standard and then maintained at that.

 

Are standardized test a distraction from the sometimes messy nature of real learning and curiosity which causes people to want to learn something? Are we taking the valuable lessons of trial and error corrections totally out of the learning equation for fear of failure when everything hangs on a standardized test passing score?

 

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Students as Curators of Their Learning Topics

Students as Curators of Their Learning Topics | Zentrum für multimediales Lehren und Lernen (LLZ) | Scoop.it

Robin Good: Must-read article on ClutterMuseum.com by Leslie M-B, exploring in depth the opportunity to have students master their selected topics by "curating" them, rather than by reading and memorizing facts about them.

 

"Critical and creative thinking should be prioritized over remembering content"

 

"That students should learn to think for themselves may seem like a no-brainer to many readers, but if you look at the textbook packages put out by publishers, you’ll find that the texts and accompanying materials (for both teachers and students) assume students are expected to read and retain content—and then be tested on it.

 

Instead, between middle school (if not earlier) and college graduation, students should practice—if not master—how to question, critique, research, and construct an argument like an historian."

 

This is indeed the critical point. Moving education from an effort to memorize things on which then to be tested, to a collaborative exercise in creating new knowledge and value by pulling and editing together individual pieces of content, resources and tools that allow the explanation/illustration of a topic from a specific viewpoint/for a specific need.

 

And I can't avoid to rejoice and second her next proposition: "What if we shifted the standards’ primary emphasis from content, and not to just the development of traditional skills—basic knowledge recall, document interpretation, research, and essay-writing—but to the cultivation of skills that challenge students to make unconventional connections, skills that are essential for thriving in the 21st century?"

 

What are these skills, you may ask. Here is a good reference where to look them up: http://www.p21.org/storage/documents/P21_Framework_Definitions.pdf (put together by the Partnership for 21st Century Skills)

 

 

Recommended. Good stuff. 9/10

 

Full article: www.cluttermuseum.com/make-students-curators/

 

(Image credit: Behance.net)

 

 


Via Robin Good, João Greno Brogueira, Amanda McAndrew, THE *OFFICIAL ANDREASCY*, LaiaJoana, Rui Guimarães Lima, Ramon Aragon, Paulo Simões, Kathrin Jäger
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Education Creations's curator insight, May 12, 2014 12:00 AM

How to turn students into curators.

Sample Student's curator insight, May 5, 2015 10:14 PM

We often ask our students to create annotated bibliographies, and this focuses on their capacity to evaluate and make decisions about the validity, reliability and relevance of sources they have found. using Scoop.it, we can ask them to do much the same thing, but they will publish their ideas for an audience, and will also be able to provide and use peer feedback to enhance and tighten up their thinking. This is relevant to any curriculum area. Of course it is dependent on schools being able to access any social media, but rather than thinking about what is impossible, perhaps we could start thinking about what is possible and lobbying for change.

Sample Student's curator insight, May 5, 2015 10:18 PM

We often ask our students to create annotated bibliographies, and this focuses on their capacity to evaluate and make decisions about the validity, reliability and relevance of sources they have found. Using Scoop.it, we can ask them to do much the same thing. But they will publish their ideas for an audience, and will also be able to provide and use peer feedback to enhance and tighten up their thinking. This is relevant to any age, and any curriculum area. Of course it is dependent on schools being able to access social media. But rather than thinking about what is impossible, perhaps we should start thinking about what is possible, and lobbying for change. Could you use a Scoop.it collection as an assessment task?