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Assessment, grading and rigor: toward common sense and predictable outcomes on tests

Assessment, grading and rigor: toward common sense and predictable outcomes on tests | Zentrum für multimediales Lehren und Lernen (LLZ) | Scoop.it
Over the last few months I have worked with a number of high schools and middle schools where the grading and assessment practices simply do not work in a world of standards. The schools are not ma...

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, August 12, 2014 10:32 PM

As many schools move to Common Core the question of rigor is a key issue. States that have tested with Common Core have seen significant drops in scores. Why? The Common Core tests are more difficult than most local tests.

Grant Wiggins states "to significantly raise local standards of performance seems to mean we have to lower student grades." Most schools do not want to do this (and certainly most parents do not want to see lower grades).

He continues to explore this issue looking at rigor, and noting that rigor is currently defined by 3 elements:

  1. The difficulty of the task or questions
  2. The difficulty of the criteria, as established by rubrics
  3. The level of achievement expected, as set by “anchors” or cut scores.

However, he notes that many schools/districts do not get past #1. Why? "The problem of fair/normed grading!"

Wiggins then goes on to the final section of this post, called "Solution: avoid thoughtless calculations based on false equivalencies."

However, there is one more section that provides two helpful pieces of information that may help you create better assessments. It includes Webb's Depth of Knowledge Wheel as well as audit matrix that looks at the Assessment Format (Task Complexity and Context) and Cognitive Demand (Depth and Fluency of Thinking). (See image above).

Additionally, he has included an appendix that has text from Webb for levels 1, 2, 3 and 4 for Math, Reading and Writing.

These are great resources to share with teachers in your district as we move to Common Core.

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The Most Important Question Every Assessment Should Answer

The Most Important Question Every Assessment Should Answer | Zentrum für multimediales Lehren und Lernen (LLZ) | Scoop.it

"The difference between assessment of learning and assessment for learning is a crucial one, in many ways indicative of an important shift in education.

Traditionally, tests have told teachers and parents how a student “does,” then offers a very accessible point of data (usually percentage correct and subsequent letter grade) that is reported to parents as a performance indicator."


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Mary Starry's curator insight, October 4, 2013 11:04 PM

"Assessment for learning" versus "assessment of learning" is also promoted as a key component of the learning portfolio all colleges of pharmacy need to have to demonstrate student achievement.

Aunty Alice's curator insight, October 6, 2013 8:40 PM

I have practiced a system that covers four of the 5 key strategies for many years starting at five years of age.  I would not teach any other way. With this kind of assessment students after seven years of age can lead parent teacher conferences with ease and confidence. Had a dad in tears once who confessed it was the first time his son had talked meaningfully to him about his learning. Then I was in tears too....

Aunty Alice's curator insight, November 21, 2013 8:03 PM

A good little diagram but it does not address the issue of how to do it..it requires modelling, first by the teacher, then slowly devolving the responsibility to the learner, and focus on one subject area at a time e.g. Literacy . In my experience it also requires set aside time with each student to assess together, recording what has been discussed so it is not forgotten. I am talking about elementary learners here.. 

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How Teaching Is Changing: 15 Examples

How Teaching Is Changing: 15 Examples | Zentrum für multimediales Lehren und Lernen (LLZ) | Scoop.it

"It’s tempting to say that no matter how much technology pushes on education, every teacher will always need to know iconic teacher practices like assessment, curriculum design, classroom management, and cognitive coaching.

This may end up being true...Below are 15 tasks that are less skill-based. and a bit more conceptual, collectively representing how teaching is changing."


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Beth Dichter's curator insight, May 5, 2014 9:50 PM

I suspect that every teacher has seen major change over the last few years. This post provides a look at changes that have happened, or are in the process. The first seven provide the change and a look at the old, the new, the difference and a short summary. One example from the post is quoted below.

Personalization

The Old: Administer assessment, evaluate performance, report performance, then–maybe–make crude adjustments the best you can

The New: Identifying, prioritizing, and evaluating data for each student individually–in real time

The Difference: Precision

For more information click through to the post.

Rudy Azcuy's curator insight, May 6, 2014 8:38 AM

How do you see education changing? How prepared are our schools for these changes?

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The 6 Types Of Assessments (And How They're Changing) - Edudemic

The 6 Types Of Assessments (And How They're Changing) - Edudemic | Zentrum für multimediales Lehren und Lernen (LLZ) | Scoop.it

Testing, especially any sort of standardized testing tends to get a bad rap. Teachers complain that they spend too much time teaching to a test. But assessments do have value, and an important place in our learning structure. By measuring what students are learning, we as teachers can look at how we are approaching different subjects, materials, and even different students. The handy infographic takes a look at different types of assessments and their attributes and questions. Keep reading to learn more.


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Shea Stehm's curator insight, August 2, 2013 1:41 PM

Testing, especially any sort of standardized testing tends to get a bad rap. Teachers complain that they spend too much time teaching to a test. But assessments do have value, and an important place in our learning structure. By measuring what students are learning, we as teachers can look at how we are approaching different subjects, materials, and even different students.

Halina Ostańkowicz-Bazan's curator insight, August 5, 2013 5:02 AM

Do you like standardized testing?

Can we stop measuring  students?

Dee KC's curator insight, August 6, 2013 3:25 PM

following the DfE's assessing without levels guidance this looks like  god place to start when reviewing how you measure progress