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How Africa can make the next quantum leap in agriculture

How Africa can make the next quantum leap in agriculture | Youth, Agriculture and Food Security | Scoop.it
Transformation of African agriculture would not only return the region to being a net producer of food, but also provide a stimulus to the region’s economy, writes Arne Cartridge.

Via Nawsheen Hosenally
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Bats can help protect rice farms against pests

Bats can help protect rice farms against pests | Youth, Agriculture and Food Security | Scoop.it
Bats can help protect rice farms against pests
SciDev.Net
“The model shows that 300 bats in each roosting box can protect almost 700 kilograms of rice per year,” Wanger tells SciDev.Net.

Via Anne Matho
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The world is thirsty because it is hungry

The world is thirsty because it is hungry | Youth, Agriculture and Food Security | Scoop.it
#Agriculture accounts for 70% of total water use http://t.co/9p2hr72sn8 http://t.co/LTbBmHIvCs

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Traditional knowledge fuels climate change adaptation

Traditional knowledge fuels climate change adaptation | Youth, Agriculture and Food Security | Scoop.it

[Although this article is about Ghana, it has broader relevance.]

 

...“Knowledge development does not arise from a vacuum. There is nothing scientific or modern that has just ‘sprung up’ out of nowhere. Every piece of modern knowledge arose from the unique customs, beliefs, principles, practices, ideas and wisdom of people at a given time, in a particular place.


Via Robin Landis, FANRPAN
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UBA Agric NPLs a low 0.06% as lender touts Agrobusiness - BusinessDay

UBA Agric NPLs a low 0.06% as lender touts Agrobusiness - BusinessDay | Youth, Agriculture and Food Security | Scoop.it
UBA Agric NPLs a low 0.06% as lender touts Agrobusiness BusinessDay The capacity for businesses in the agricultural sector in Nigeria to engineer economic growth and sustainable development, generate employment and reduce poverty is the major...

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Innovations in Agricultural Development | Facebook

Innovations in Agricultural Development | Facebook | Youth, Agriculture and Food Security | Scoop.it
Seven innovations in agriculture that are making this a #BetterWorld: http://t.co/qKvXvOvgfd
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Slum Farmers Rise Above the Sewers | Inter Pres...

Slum Farmers Rise Above the Sewers | Inter Pres... | Youth, Agriculture and Food Security | Scoop.it
Slum Farmers Rise Above the Sewers - Tucked deep in Kenya’s sprawling Kibera slum is the shanty that Alice Atieno calls home.

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When family farmers lead their own development

When family farmers lead their own development | Youth, Agriculture and Food Security | Scoop.it
Steven Kiranga Gichanga is a family farmer in Mugaari, a village in Kenya. He was trained in goat rearing but could not afford a goat to get started. He was also trained in bee keeping but could not afford a bee hive either. After a community reflection forum in 2012, Steven became aware of his own creative capacities and his ability to think outside the box. Then he came up with a brilliant idea.

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Small holder farmers in Africa invest $100 billion in farming

By Brenda Zulu

While billions of money are pledged by the G8 and G20 fora, the African investors are farmers and among them are small holder farmers who invest about $100 billion every year in their farms, despite lack of credit facilities.

Despite significant growth, Africa still faces major challenges of food and nutrition insecurity, youth and women unemployment especially in the rural areas.

Speaking on the 28TH Food Agriculture Organisation (FAO) Conference held in Tunisia, 24 to 28th March 2014, Dr Ibrahim Assane Mayaki CEO of NEPAD Planning and Coordinating Agency said the Comprehensive Africa Agriculture Development programme (CAADP) would contribute to addressing the challenges as it is an agenda for transformation.

"CAADP has established it self as a brand throughout out Africa and the rest of the world," said Dr Mayaki.

He said the main success of CAADP was fostering political alignment which was a major shift made in the approach to development aid.

He outlined CAADP risks as being able to ensure to respond to hopes raised by a country and the Regional Economic Commission (REC)  level and affirm the impact of CAADP by ascertaining whether or not the process has contributed to an increase in food production and resource mobilization.

Dr Mayaki  called on African leaders to recognise the need to mobilize domestic resources for agriculture.

"Since 2003, only 13 countries  have met or surpassed the CAADP target in or more years. The increase in public expenditure is the same as in other sectors," observed Dr Mayaki.

Overall in Africa, agriculture budgetary allocation is around 4 % which is far below the 10% Maputo declaration even through some other countries have made an effort.

Given the low overalls of national budgets, there is no doubt that African governments still rely on external financing for agriculture development which is not sustainable and desirable.

Dr Mayaki said CAADP faced a risk as there was bureaucratization within the programme  of which a focus on investments in practice led to creating dependency with regard to donor funding strategy.

"Some stakeholders say that CAADP does not speak  to their problems," said Dr Mayaki.

The other risk was for  African leaders to be diverted from the CAADP commitment to that which may not reflect Africa's agenda.  The concern for NEPAD was to ensure that investor interests converged with those of the main stakeholders. Agriculture producer organisations should therefore put their opinions forward and engage in a dialogue with other private sector.

Dr Mayaki further advises African governments to capitalise on achievements so far to enhance impact in CAADP plans and increase in productivity.

Governments should reaffirm it's leadership by articulating actions with continental and regional organisations, improve partnership with farmers and private sector and also mobilize domestics resources.

To sustain the CAADP momentum, African countries should upgrade their food security and food sovereignty strategy by being progressive in integration at world markets and get involved in international negotiations.

There is also need to refocus public intervention on market failures and promote risk coverage and provision of public goods with considerations for environmental and nutrition policies.

"I would like to reiterate the necessity of ensuring that Nutrition is mainstreamed in all our inventions and the ZERO Hunger initiative will contribute to it," said Dr Mayaki.

He also called on the promotion is safety nets for the poor, women's rights and the improvement of local governance on water and land while promoting access to sustainable and renewable energy.

He added that Africa should promote and prioritize sustainable farming systems that were labour intensive and environmental friends to support family smallholders.

The African Union (AU) is this year celebrating 10 years of CAADP, year of agriculture and the UN  year of family farming.By Brenda Zulu

While billions of money are pledged by the G8 and G20 fora, the African investors are farmers and among them are small holder farmers who invest about $100 billion every year in their farms, despite lack of credit facilities.

Despite significant growth, Africa still faces major challenges of food and nutrition insecurity, youth and women unemployment especially in the rural areas.

Speaking on the 28TH Food Agriculture Organisation (FAO) Conference held in Tunisia, 24 to 28th March 2014, Dr Ibrahim Assane Mayaki CEO of NEPAD Planning and Coordinating Agency said the Comprehensive Africa Agriculture Development programme (CAADP) would contribute to addressing the challenges as it is an agenda for transformation.

"CAADP has established it self as a brand throughout out Africa and the rest of the world," said Dr Mayaki.

He said the main success of CAADP was fostering political alignment which was a major shift made in the approach to development aid.

He outlined CAADP risks as being able to ensure to respond to hopes raised by a country and the Regional Economic Commission (REC)  level and affirm the impact of CAADP by ascertaining whether or not the process has contributed to an increase in food production and resource mobilization.

Dr Mayaki  called on African leaders to recognise the need to mobilize domestic resources for agriculture.

"Since 2003, only 13 countries  have met or surpassed the CAADP target in or more years. The increase in public expenditure is the same as in other sectors," observed Dr Mayaki.

Overall in Africa, agriculture budgetary allocation is around 4 % which is far below the 10% Maputo declaration even through some other countries have made an effort.

Given the low overalls of national budgets, there is no doubt that African governments still rely on external financing for agriculture development which is not sustainable and desirable.

Dr Mayaki said CAADP faced a risk as there was bureaucratization within the programme  of which a focus on investments in practice led to creating dependency with regard to donor funding strategy.

"Some stakeholders say that CAADP does not speak  to their problems," said Dr Mayaki.

The other risk was for  African leaders to be diverted from the CAADP commitment to that which may not reflect Africa's agenda.  The concern for NEPAD was to ensure that investor interests converged with those of the main stakeholders. Agriculture producer organisations should therefore put their opinions forward and engage in a dialogue with other private sector.

Dr Mayaki further advises African governments to capitalise on achievements so far to enhance impact in CAADP plans and increase in productivity.

Governments should reaffirm it's leadership by articulating actions with continental and regional organisations, improve partnership with farmers and private sector and also mobilize domestics resources.

To sustain the CAADP momentum, African countries should upgrade their food security and food sovereignty strategy by being progressive in integration at world markets and get involved in international negotiations.

There is also need to refocus public intervention on market failures and promote risk coverage and provision of public goods with considerations for environmental and nutrition policies.

"I would like to reiterate the necessity of ensuring that Nutrition is mainstreamed in all our inventions and the ZERO Hunger initiative will contribute to it," said Dr Mayaki.

He also called on the promotion is safety nets for the poor, women's rights and the improvement of local governance on water and land while promoting access to sustainable and renewable energy.

He added that Africa should promote and prioritize sustainable farming systems that were labour intensive and environmental friends to support family smallholders.

The African Union (AU) is this year celebrating 10 years of CAADP, year of agriculture and the UN  year of family farming.


Via Brenda Nglazi Zulu
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Pascal Corbé's curator insight, April 25, 2014 4:57 PM

The relation to Rural Futures will have to be looked at for a more comprehensive approach to rural development in Africa.

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2013 CAADP Journalist of the Year Awards

 2013 CAADP Journalist of the Year Awards

Sustaining the CAADP Momentum

October 2013 – 14 February 2014

 

ENTRANT’S   DETAILS

Name & Surname:

 

Date of Birth:

 

Nationality:

 

Email:

 

City:

 

Country:

 

Postal address:

 

Contact number:

 

ENTRY   CATEGORY (choose only one)

News articles,   features and general stories

 

Videos,   documentaries and television broadcasts

 

Radio and audio   broadcasts

 

Photography

 

CAADP   PRIORITY AREA (more than one pillar may be selected)

Pillar 1: Extending   the area under sustainable land management

 

Pillar 2: Improving   rural infrastructure and trade related capacities for market access

 

Pillar 3: Increasing   food supply and reducing hunger

 

Pillar 4:   Agricultural research, technology dissemination and adoption

 

 

ENTRANT’S   DECLARATION

 

I DECLARE THAT:

The information I   have provided on this form and in my submission is true and correct.  If such information submitted by myself is   deliberately false or misleading, I will be disqualified or the award   withdrawn if it has already been given.

I have read and   consent to the content of this declaration.

Name:

 

Signed:

 

Date:

 

Company:

 

Position   in company:

 

 

 

    

 

 

 

Submission Guideline

1.  Written submission:

All written entries should include the following documents:

The written      work in word format; a cover page will be included and on this page, the CAADP      priority area for which the work is submitted must be clearly indicated;A      short biographical note (to introduce the applicant / contestant),      including his/her full contact details (email address, telephone      number(s), postal address, town, country, etc.)The written      submission cannot be more than 500 words.2.  Audio submission:

All audio entries should:

Be      not more than 20 minutes in duration;A      short biographical note (to introduce the applicant / contestant),      including his/her full contact details (email address, telephone      number(s), postal address, town, country, etc.)Be      submitted in the following file format, .MP3 or .WAV.3.  Video submission:

All video entries should:

Be      not more than 20 minutes in duration;A      short biographical note (to introduce the applicant / contestant),      including his/her full contact details (email address, telephone      number(s), postal address, town, country, etc.)Be      submitted in the following file format, .AVI, .SLV, or .MPEG4.4.  Photo submission:

All photo entries must provide images with the following specifications:

Image      data files created with digital still cameras (including medium and      large-format cameras).File      format: JPEGFile      size per JPEG: more than 1500 x 2100 pixels/more than 150dpi/up to a minimum      2MBPhoto      files can be submitted in the following formats: JPEG, PNG and GIF.No      Photo should be digitally altered or enhanced except for basic cropping or      colour correction. The content and context of the image should in no way      be altered or enhanced.Each image      that is sent should include the following information:
     Full name and contact details of Contestant; location of Photo; date Photo      was taken; include a caption of the Photo(s), and the full name of the      person/people with their image captured in the Photo(s).Be      submitted with a short written biographical note (to introduce the      applicant / contestant), including his/her full contact details (email      address, telephone number(s), postal address, town, country, etc.)* Note: Winners may be requested to provide higher resolution images for publication or display purposes related to the Contest.

 

Indemnity

The      African Union Commission and the NEPAD Agency are not responsible for any      damage or loss that may occur during the sending of entries via the      Internet.The African      Union Commission and NEPAD Agency are not responsible for any problems or      damages experienced by the Contestant due to forces beyond the control of the      African Union Commission and  NEPAD      Agency are not responsible, such as but not limited to troubles relating      to computer networks, computer virus infections or unauthorized computer      access.During      the media coverage, each Contestant shall have strictly complied with the      laws and regulations in force in the country the coverage was made; and      more especially the laws and regulations in force related to the      Intellectual Property Rights.Contestants      must possess the exclusive intellectual property rights to each of its      entered work (i.e. the Photo(s), videos, podcasts and the articles) are      responsible for having obtained any necessary permissions relating to the      subject/subject matter. The African Union Commission and the NEPAD Agency will      not be responsible for any claims or complaints against infringement of      rights or damages from third parties relating to the subject/subject      matter of entries, and the Contestant agrees to indemnify and hold the      African Union Commission and the NEPAD Agency harmless in such cases.A      Photo which displays an identified or identifiable person(s) may infringe      on such person’s right of privacy or may disclose such person’s personal      information. Contestants shall have taken all the necessary actions to      avoid any infringement of personal rights, including the rights to image      from the person captured in the Photos. Thus all Contestants are deemed      responsible  to have formally      obtained from such person(s) all necessary permissions and assignments of      all rights) to use their image(s) by the African Union Commission and the      NEPAD Agency, for an unlimited duration, for the whole world, for all      forms, supports and media limitless in terms of number.

Copyright

Material      submitted for the Awards shall include the names and contact information      of all people shown therein. Minors – meaning children under the age of 18      years – shall have the signed approval of their parent(s) or guardian(s)      before being photographed. Contestants must attach the signed release form      from parent(s) or guardian(s) with their entries.Alternatively,      Contestants should submit a declaration bearing responsibility for the      subject and subject matter in the material as well as express warranties      that all the third parties involved such as the persons with their image      captured in the photos have expressly authorized the use of their image      and assigned in full, the intellectual rights attached to their image.The      copyright of submitted and winning entries will be owned by the participating      Contestants. The winning entries shall be exclusively owned by the      African Union Commission and the NEPAD Agency for      non-commercial usages such as promotion, publicity, news, informational      education or awareness usage relating to the African Union      Commission, NEPAD Agency and their partners. Therefore, all the      winning entries shall be graciously vested in the African Union      Commission and the NEPAD Agency with full title. The rights thus      assigned to the African Union Commission and the NEPAD Agency shall cover the whole world, rights of      use, rights of reproduction, of representation, of adaptation, such uses      taking any form whatsoever including such forms as are not at present      envisaged and shall be limitless in terms of both time and number. Therefore,      the      African Union Commission and NEPAD Agency and its partners shall be fully entitled, but not limited, to      use the submitted material for all print media and off-media, publishing,      edition, all public  editorial or      press relations, for educational, journalistic, informative purposes, for      all sponsoring, festival, cultural events, all expositions or exhibitions,      during international or conferences events. In addition, the rights      assigned includes the diffusion of the entrants’ work in all public places      and on all data processing networks (Internet world on-line and off-line, interactive terminals, e-cards, savers of screen,      down loaded or not, CD-ROM, DVD).Contestants      will be able to use their material, which they retain the moral copyright to,      in their print and online portfolios, exhibitions, books and other      publications and to disseminate – including sell – their material to      interested clients. They will be identified as the authors of the submitted      products.Contestants      who are submitting written, video and audio work shall assign the African      Union Commission and NEPAD Agency with all the authorship rights      attached to the products, which include but is not limited to the right to      use, publish, circulate, reproduce, translate; represent and adapt the products      in any and all forms whatsoever and      limitless in terms of both time and number. Such assignments shall cover      the same scope of assignment of rights than the rights described      hereinbefore for photos.

How to Enter

After carefully reading all the information on these pages, download the entry form, fill it in and send your image, article, audio or video product, along with the entry form to both the NEPAD Agency and the African Union Commission using the following e-mail addresses:

NEPAD Agency

Ms. Mwanja Ng'anjo

E-mail: mwanjan@nepad.org

 

African   Union Commission

Ms. Carol Jilombo

E-mail:   Jilomboc@africa-union.org

 

Submissions must be made via laptop; desktop computer; tablet computer or smartphone.

Notification to Winners

The winners will be notified through email by the end of February 2014.

Disclaimers:

At the time of entry, entrants are deemed to have read, understood and be in agreement with all the rules and conditions.  The NEPAD Agency and African Union Commission reserve the right to rule on any issue(s) not cevered by these rules and disclaimers.  In the event that an entrant should disagree with any decision made, that entrant will have the right to withdraw his or her entry.  All related expenses incurred shall be borne solely by the entrant.

In the event that the efficiency, security, selection procedure, fairness of the contest or any related operations are deemed to have been compromised by forces beyond the control of the NEPAD Agency and the African Union Commission – such as but not limited to troubles relating to computer networks, computer virus infections or unauthorized computer access – then the receipt of some or all entries via the Internet may be postponed or discontinued.

 

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Agriculture can be a goldmine for the youth - The New Times Rwanda

Agriculture can be a goldmine for the youth - The New Times Rwanda | Youth, Agriculture and Food Security | Scoop.it
Unemployment among the youth remains one of the biggest hurdles faced by developing countries.

Via FANRPAN
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Olawale Isaiah Ojo's comment, September 27, 2013 1:57 AM
It is a goldmine. not can be.
Rescooped by Olawale Isaiah Ojo from Agriculture,Urban Farming,Food security,Agriprenuership, Youth, Ag Journalism and Online Ag media
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Avozilla: the world's largest avocado

Avozilla: the world's largest avocado | Youth, Agriculture and Food Security | Scoop.it
Picture: An avocado five times the size of the regular sort is about to hit the shelves of British supermarkets

Via Emmie Kio
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Agriculture: The Good and Bad in a Sector that Looks Cheap*

Agriculture: The Good and Bad in a Sector that Looks Cheap* | Youth, Agriculture and Food Security | Scoop.it
The case for investing in global agriculture supply companies is fairly obvious and well known. The world’s population cruised past the 7 Billion.
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The World Bank’s plan to help end ‘absolute poverty’

The World Bank’s plan to help end ‘absolute poverty’ | Youth, Agriculture and Food Security | Scoop.it
The World Bank is promising the poor will not always be with us. “We will join forces to end absolute poverty by 2030,” World Bank president Jim Yong...

Via Dr. Bukar Usman (D.V.M., M.V.S.c)
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