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Digital Storytelling: a survey of recent apps

Digital Storytelling: a survey of recent apps | Young Adult and Children's Stories | Scoop.it
Tweet   Digital Storytelling combines images, narration, and other audio to tell a story. Every content area has a story and each student is capable of telling it.

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SummerTeen: A Celebration of Young Adult Books — The Digital Shift

SummerTeen: A Celebration of Young Adult Books — The Digital Shift | Young Adult and Children's Stories | Scoop.it
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Video Games and Storytelling


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Mariana Soffer's comment, July 23, 2012 6:21 AM
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Why writing an app is different to writing a children's picture book

Why writing an app is different to writing a children's picture book | Young Adult and Children's Stories | Scoop.it

Stuart Dredge: "Moira Butterfield and Nosy Crow keen to see authors and publishers collaborating more on book-apps."


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Imagine a Pixar video game …

Imagine a Pixar video game … | Young Adult and Children's Stories | Scoop.it

Rich Stanton: "Thinking of movies and games as totally distinct enterprises ignores all the blurring that happens at the boundaries, where new ways of telling stories and engaging audiences are constantly being born."


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iPad Best of the Best – 50 Essential Children’s Book Apps (Part 2: Preschoolers) | The Digital Media Diet

iPad Best of the Best – 50 Essential Children’s Book Apps (Part 2: Preschoolers) | The Digital Media Diet | Young Adult and Children's Stories | Scoop.it

Children’s book apps have been around now for over two years and we have seen a lot of wonderful titles at Digital-Storytime.com over this time. What follows is the second of a four-part series, listing the best 50 iPad books for kids, broken down by age.

This list is of apps that are appropriate for kids aged three to five, although many are also quite enjoyable for children a bit younger and older than this range. We’ve selected the very best titles we’ve found for preschoolers in 2012. We have not included any of the titles that made our list in 2011, so please also check out: iPad Best of the Best – 25 Essential Children’s Book Apps. At the end of this ‘top 10 for preschoolers’ list, we have a special list of top FREE apps for safety awareness. ♥


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Why Do Supervillains Fascinate Us? A Psychological Perspective

Why Do Supervillains Fascinate Us? A Psychological Perspective | Young Adult and Children's Stories | Scoop.it

Travis Langley: "Why are we fascinated by supervillains? Posing the question is much like asking why evil itself intrigues us, but there’s much more to our continued interest in supervillains than meets the eye."


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Mobile Kids App Education Revolution: Common Core State Standards | Staytoooned for Mobile Kids Apps

Mobile Kids App Education Revolution: Common Core State Standards | Staytoooned for Mobile Kids Apps | Young Adult and Children's Stories | Scoop.it
Core Values is a hot topic in parenting and teaching circles. Everyone wants what’s best for their little budding brainiac. But does it work?

 

Core Values is a hot topic in parenting and teaching circles. Everyone wants what’s best for their little budding brainiac. But does it work? Many, like Sir Ken Robinson (acclaimed educationalist) and most of the best private schools in the world don’t think so.

 

Not only is the Core Value initiative an old model based on an old paradigm of teaching, production line education at its best produces conformity. But when the first authors designed our our current system, conformity in society was what everyone wanted. “Follow the leader!” And we did. The handful of creative thinkers who dared to step outside of the box became pioneering entrepreneurs. And we followed. While knowing how to get along with the group is as necessary as learning one’s ABC’s, that kind of teaching fails us when we try to stand out or even stand up to the new global dynamic.

 

The major problem with the CORE VALUE argument is what it leaves out ...


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John Barbour; a conversation with the CEO of LeapFrog - Global Toy News

John Barbour; a conversation with the CEO of LeapFrog - Global Toy News | Young Adult and Children's Stories | Scoop.it
John Barbour, CEO of LeapFrog, graciously agreed to do an interview with me that turned out to be a great conversation. John is fun to be around. When you first...
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Learning 'the art of story telling' from Gaming - Pretentious Title

Learning 'the art of story telling'  from Gaming - Pretentious Title | Young Adult and Children's Stories | Scoop.it

For example, an easy challenge at the beginning of the novel is a quick way to give characters instant cool factor. You simply set up a challenge that looks hard, but is actually something the character can do with ease. Stopping an assassin, say, or slaying a demon, it’s rough stuff for us normal people, but all in a day’s work for our heroes. However, this sort of thing can’t be used exclusively. A novel where the challenge level never gets above 2 (challenging) has no teeth. If the characters are never truly pushed, they’ll never grow, and you’re left with dull, static people. Plus, no one likes a main villain who goes out like a punk.

On the other hand, though, you almost never want to use an overwhelming challenge, and certainly never multiple ones. When you give your people a hurdle they can’t possibly jump on their own, you’re taking the power of the story out of your character’s hands, turning them into passengers on their own plot. While taking power away from a normally powerful character can create great tension, powerless characters are boring over the long term, and no one likes to see their favorite heroine get the shaft at the very end.


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Cool!Mobile Movie Marketing Gets Weird: Behind ParaNorman’s Richly Detailed iOS Game, “2-Bit Bub”

Cool!Mobile Movie Marketing Gets Weird: Behind ParaNorman’s Richly Detailed iOS Game, “2-Bit Bub” | Young Adult and Children's Stories | Scoop.it
ParaNorman, a stop-motion feature film from animation studio Laika about a strange kid that makes friends with the undead, is far from normal.

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Cool Kickstarter Project: FOLLOW THE LEADER and Reality Check Interactive

A teenage coming-of-age story. A live event that reveals what people really think. A way to more meaningful political dialogue in 2012.

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Publishing Perspectives : Dr. Who, Then and Now, Seen Through the Eyes of His Editor

Publishing Perspectives : Dr. Who, Then and Now, Seen Through the Eyes of His Editor | Young Adult and Children's Stories | Scoop.it
The Doctor Who books helped author Steve Cole learned to read, then he became series editor and wrote one himself. He reflects on a lifetime of time travel.
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Bob Stein: "Build conversations around books" | FutureBook

Bob Stein: "Build conversations around books" | FutureBook | Young Adult and Children's Stories | Scoop.it

With much talk in the industry about innovation, Bob Stein, leading innovator in the book space for three decades, has some advice for publishers. Make books social, build the conversation around books, hire some bright people and lock them in a room.

 

If they do that, they just might have a chance, he insists. "The current system of publishing doesn't really support the shape publishing is taking on as it develops," says Stein, who founded The Voyager Company in 1985, the first commercial multimedia CD-ROM publisher.

 

But publishers are chronically slow at recognising what is happening to them and grasping the opportunities before they emerge. Stein argues that the real innovation is happening left-of-centre in sectors such as gaming, where collaborative narratives have already taken root. "The future is being born outside their field of vision," he says ...


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On Creating in a Transmedia Universe

On Creating in a Transmedia Universe | Young Adult and Children's Stories | Scoop.it
Jan Bozarth's Fairy Godmother Academy began as a book series, but has expanded into multiple formats. Here she explains her philosophy of creation/re-creation.

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Ebooks Choices and the Soul of Librarianship — The Digital Shift

Ebooks Choices and the Soul of Librarianship — The Digital Shift | Young Adult and Children's Stories | Scoop.it

Over the last few years, as a fifth of American adults have gotten ereaders, ebooks have transformed the book market and reading landscape. The library market is no exception. There’s now an array of established vendors and emerging options for libraries to choose from in order to deliver ebooks to patrons. In my job as the librarian at one of the emerging options (Unglue.it), I’ve seen the pros and cons of various models, and thought about what those mean.

Here’s my conclusion: ebook models make us choose. And I don’t mean choosing which catalog, or interface, or set of contract terms we want — though we do make those choices, and they matter. I mean that we choose which values to advance, and which to sacrifice. We’re making those values choices every time we sign a contract, whether we talk about it or not ...


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Watch a New Episode of Amy Poehler’s Web Series About Awesome Girls - Flavorwire

Watch a New Episode of Amy Poehler’s Web Series About Awesome Girls - Flavorwire | Young Adult and Children's Stories | Scoop.it
Flavorwire: Cultural news and critique from Flavorpill...
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iPad Best of the Best – 50 Essential Children’s Book Apps (Part 2: Preschoolers) | The Digital Media Diet

iPad Best of the Best – 50 Essential Children’s Book Apps (Part 2: Preschoolers) | The Digital Media Diet | Young Adult and Children's Stories | Scoop.it

Children’s book apps have been around now for over two years and we have seen a lot of wonderful titles at Digital-Storytime.com over this time. What follows is the second of a four-part series, listing the best 50 iPad books for kids, broken down by age.

This list is of apps that are appropriate for kids aged three to five, although many are also quite enjoyable for children a bit younger and older than this range. We’ve selected the very best titles we’ve found for preschoolers in 2012. We have not included any of the titles that made our list in 2011, so please also check out: iPad Best of the Best – 25 Essential Children’s Book Apps. At the end of this ‘top 10 for preschoolers’ list, we have a special list of top FREE apps for safety awareness. ♥


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CGSociety Newsletter: EXPOSÉ 10 Pre-Order, Masters revealed, ZBrush 4R4 and CGWorkshops!

CGSociety Newsletter: EXPOSÉ 10 Pre-Order, Masters revealed, ZBrush 4R4 and CGWorkshops! | Young Adult and Children's Stories | Scoop.it
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Transmedia Storytelling in the Class Room – Transmedia Storyteller

Transmedia Storytelling in the Class Room – Transmedia Storyteller | Young Adult and Children's Stories | Scoop.it
A great example of how Transmedia and ARG's can be used in the classroom.
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The Declining Story of Celebrity in Book Marketing | Sparksheet

The Declining Story of Celebrity in Book Marketing | Sparksheet | Young Adult and Children's Stories | Scoop.it
The Hunger Games wasn’t just a blockbuster film – it also catapulted the books it was based on to the top of the bestseller list. Nina Lassam unpacks the movie’s success and how it marks a turning point for book marketers.
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If We Can’t Have Real Magical Books, At Least We’re Getting J.K. Rowling’s PlayStation-Powered Harry Potter “Wonderbook”

If We Can’t Have Real Magical Books, At Least We’re Getting J.K. Rowling’s PlayStation-Powered Harry Potter “Wonderbook” | Young Adult and Children's Stories | Scoop.it

What if there was a book that had no words in it? What if this book that required a camera, a TV and a video game console in order for you to “read” it? Would you call this progress? Would you call it science fiction?

 

Sony calls it the Wonderbook and has enlisted Harry Potter author J. K. Rowling to write some spells for the first Wonderbook, the Book of Spells. It is — and, come on, this is cool — a way to simulate the concept of the magical book.

 

You don’t really read Wonderbook. You interact with it, while seated on the floor or with the book on a coffee table. You don’t look at the book. You look at the TV. You hold a PlayStation Move wand controller in your hand to “touch” the pages. It’s weird, but it’s also clever. It probably wouldn’t be a great way to ready any Joyce or Dostoevsky or even any of Rowling’s real books. But for those of us who are fascinated by crazy contraptions and/or would like to feel as if we own at least one book that has creatures living in its pages, this one’s for us.

 

Our video up top gives you the tour. Wonderbook and its debut title, Book of Spells, will be out later this fall....


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Write 'Choose Your Own Adventure’ Books Through This Clever HTML5 App

Write 'Choose Your Own Adventure’ Books Through This Clever HTML5 App | Young Adult and Children's Stories | Scoop.it

Mark Wilson: "The branching narratives of interactive books are logistical nightmares. That is, until one company released this free writing tool" ...


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Building an audience for our apps :: Blog :: Nosy Crow

Building an audience for our apps :: Blog :: Nosy Crow | Young Adult and Children's Stories | Scoop.it

This Wednesday (July 25, 2012), Bizzy Bear Builds a House will be free on theApp Store for 24 hours.

 

One of the most exciting (and sometimes, quite scary) things about making apps is the fact that so much is new and unknown. The way we tell stories, the way we engage children, and the way we sell our products are all different to how we do things with our print books, which can be incredibly liberating. Selling our apps on the iTunes App Store presents a unique set of challenges around discoverability and marketing, and one of the ways in which app developers like us can try and increase our visibility on the App Store is by experimenting with pricing.

 

Very broadly speaking (and without taking into account other, admittedly large, factors like quality and brand power), apps that cost little are downloaded in greater numbers than apps that cost a lot (which is not to say that they make more money), and apps that are free are downloaded in even greater numbers. The more downloads your app receives, the higher it climbs in sales charts, and the more visible it becomes, and so the more likely it is to be downloaded by other people. This is what’s known as a positive feedback loop (there is an incredibly interesting book called Winners and Losers, which looks at how positive feedback loops – which are not always good – have affected different businesses).

We’ve never experimented with a free price model before, but we 


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