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Countries that are most and least welcoming to foreigners

Countries that are most and least welcoming to foreigners | yes | Scoop.it
Blue countries are more welcoming, red countries less. Where does yours rank?

Via Seth Dixon, Sally Egan
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Jess Pitrone's comment, May 5, 2013 5:25 PM
A lot of things about these rankings of countries that are least welcoming to foreigners surprised me, while others seemed blatantly obvious. It’s no surprise to me that countries like Iceland and New Zealand are among the most welcoming, they’re both in the middle of no where and no one ever visits them. I’m sure they jump at the chance for someone to visit! What did surprise me, however, was that the United States wasn’t less welcoming. I thought for sure we’d be in the red. The way Americans treats foreigners is appalling, no matter where their from (because we’ll probably mistake them from being from somewhere else that we don’t like), or if they’re here to visit or to live. Although we expect to be treated the exact opposite in any other country, and would prefer to be waited on and catered to. It’s very interesting to me that Mexico is more welcoming then the U.S., which is ironic, because we generally don’t welcome them.
Thomas D's comment, May 6, 2013 10:29 AM
I think this map of least and most welcoming countries to tourist is very interesting. I look at this through the American point of view and see that countries like Russia, Iran and Pakistan who are among the least welcoming states. These are all countries that we have had conflicts with throughout our countries history. I also find it interesting that the United States is such a neutral country towards tourism. A country that was based off of immigrants is no longer so welcoming to outsiders coming to our country. This could be due to the recent terrorist acts that have taken place within the United States in the past 15 years. Also just by looking at the map in a broader sense most of the countries that are unwelcoming are located in western Europe and Asia rather than anywhere else in the world.
Paul Beavers's comment, July 4, 2013 7:35 PM
Well the Chinese sure hide it well. I've visited there twice (once for a month) and I couldn't have been more welcomed. The people were the best part of both visits.
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Geography of Gangnam Style

Geography of Gangnam Style | yes | Scoop.it

Geography of Gangnam Style...Nice shout out to Seth Dixon


Via Nancy Watson
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SRA's curator insight, April 17, 2015 8:42 PM

Chris M, 4/17


This is a quick article discussing the rise of the pacific rim countries along the Atlantic. It discusses how 4 Asiatic countries battle against each other on the world economic stage, and the major events leading to this current power struggle. Noteworthy is the fact that this power struggle is mostly due to the interdependency between these nations and the US. The demand from the US to manufacture more goods and export them has changed the geographical development of the area; lands set aside for agricultural use are becoming less abundant as factories continue to be built. It raises a good question as to what would happen if the US were to no longer be a factor in these countries development, and which direction would they head in afterwards. Would factories become more of a priority and industrialization continue, or would there be a lack of demand and slump in the economy?



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Countries that are most and least welcoming to foreigners

Countries that are most and least welcoming to foreigners | yes | Scoop.it
Blue countries are more welcoming, red countries less. Where does yours rank?

Via Seth Dixon, Sally Egan
Bryan Chung's insight:

cool

more...
Jess Pitrone's comment, May 5, 2013 5:25 PM
A lot of things about these rankings of countries that are least welcoming to foreigners surprised me, while others seemed blatantly obvious. It’s no surprise to me that countries like Iceland and New Zealand are among the most welcoming, they’re both in the middle of no where and no one ever visits them. I’m sure they jump at the chance for someone to visit! What did surprise me, however, was that the United States wasn’t less welcoming. I thought for sure we’d be in the red. The way Americans treats foreigners is appalling, no matter where their from (because we’ll probably mistake them from being from somewhere else that we don’t like), or if they’re here to visit or to live. Although we expect to be treated the exact opposite in any other country, and would prefer to be waited on and catered to. It’s very interesting to me that Mexico is more welcoming then the U.S., which is ironic, because we generally don’t welcome them.
Thomas D's comment, May 6, 2013 10:29 AM
I think this map of least and most welcoming countries to tourist is very interesting. I look at this through the American point of view and see that countries like Russia, Iran and Pakistan who are among the least welcoming states. These are all countries that we have had conflicts with throughout our countries history. I also find it interesting that the United States is such a neutral country towards tourism. A country that was based off of immigrants is no longer so welcoming to outsiders coming to our country. This could be due to the recent terrorist acts that have taken place within the United States in the past 15 years. Also just by looking at the map in a broader sense most of the countries that are unwelcoming are located in western Europe and Asia rather than anywhere else in the world.
Paul Beavers's comment, July 4, 2013 7:35 PM
Well the Chinese sure hide it well. I've visited there twice (once for a month) and I couldn't have been more welcomed. The people were the best part of both visits.
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10 Most Visited Cities In The World- 2013

10 Most Visited Cities In The World- 2013 | yes | Scoop.it
Many of us like to explore new places and taste new foods and learn about their culture, but we never gave a thought before preferring a place to vis

Via Don Dea, Sally Egan, Craig Day
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Sally Egan's curator insight, September 15, 2013 5:20 PM

Tourism....info graphic on world top tourist cities.

Lorettayoung's curator insight, May 8, 2014 8:34 PM

where's australia

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Great Barrier Reef: Under Threat

Great Barrier Reef: Under Threat | yes | Scoop.it
The Great Barrier Reef is a World Heritage Area that belongs to Australia. Yet this rich bio-diverse fragile ecosystem...

Via dilaycock, Sally Egan, Craig Day
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dilaycock's curator insight, August 26, 2013 1:14 AM

One of many useful resources from ABC Splash 

Sally Egan's curator insight, August 27, 2013 2:54 AM

Ecosystems at Risk...

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Which City Has the Worst Air Pollution in the World? - Slate Magazine

Which City Has the Worst Air Pollution in the World? - Slate Magazine | yes | Scoop.it
Slate Magazine
Which City Has the Worst Air Pollution in the World?
Slate Magazine
China's appalling air quality made headlines around the world this winter.

Via Sally Egan
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Sally Egan's curator insight, March 6, 2013 7:21 PM

Megacities - challenges of air quality.

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The Big Squeeze: Can Cities Save The Earth?

The Big Squeeze: Can Cities Save The Earth? | yes | Scoop.it
What if you put all 7 billion humans into one city, a city as dense as New York, with its towers and skyscrapers? How big would that 7 billion-sized city be? As big as New Jersey? Texas? Bigger? Are cities protecting wild spaces on the planet?

Via Seth Dixon, Sally Egan
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Magnus Gustafsson's comment, May 2, 2013 2:59 AM
Yes. Keviin. I think the infograph about developed countries are most interesting and useful for my students.
Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 2:12 PM

Its been known that Americans have lavish lifestyles compared to outher populous countries. In this article they show a represntation if the entire world lived like (had as much space) americans and it was astoudning. It would take 4 earths to fit the world if everyone had this lavish lifestyle. So we obviously need to change our ways. Cities ae very helpful to sharing this earth. They serve as a main hub so youll only have to ship to a few places. This with the shortening of distances would save tons of gas and othe rescources. But as the article states everyone living in a Main city wouldnt be possible because people need to produce outside the city. So in my opinion for this city world to work it would need to be a few megacities preferably one on each continent and for them to the city be surronded by production methods.

Peter Hillman's curator insight, July 22, 2014 11:42 PM

An interactive site for comparisons of city sizes

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Google Maps fun--playing with Sea Level Rise

Google Maps fun--playing with Sea Level Rise | yes | Scoop.it

The updated HeyWhatsThat Map site allows you not only to play with different artificial sea levels, but also to add contour levels and even land cover if you want.

 

The above image shows the Grand Canyon area with red set at 1630m asl, orange at 1730m, yelllow at 1830, and blue contour lines at 200m intervals.  Really brings out the startling erosional features of the area.


Via YEC Geo, Craig Day
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What each country leads the world in

What each country leads the world in | yes | Scoop.it

Click here to edit the title


Via Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria Inc. (GTAV), Craig Day
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