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Artful, Aerial Views of Humanity's Impact

Artful, Aerial Views of Humanity's Impact | Lorraine's Landforms and Landscapes | Scoop.it
Using aerial photographs that render imperiled landscapes almost abstract, Edward Burtynsky explores the consequences of human activity bearing down on the earth’s resources.

Via Seth Dixon
Lorraine Chaffer's insight:

People change landscapes. This is a great resource available as an iPad App also Called Burtynsky Water. 

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 5, 2014 12:21 PM

This set of over a dozen images highlight the extent that humanity has modified the physical landscape.  These thoughtfully selected images are excellent 'teaching images' with a wide range of classroom applications.


Tags: remote sensing, geospatialenvironment modify, images, perspective.

Diane Johnson's curator insight, August 11, 2014 8:12 AM

These images may be very useful for teaching the DCI's under the Human Impact topic.

Alexandra Piggott's curator insight, August 11, 2014 6:48 PM

Is this evidence of homgeniziation of landscapes?

Lorraine's Landforms and Landscapes
Resources  linked to the Australian Curriculum Geography
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Earth's tectonic plates skitter about

Earth's tectonic plates skitter about | Lorraine's Landforms and Landscapes | Scoop.it

"Geoscientists have unveiled a computer model that maps the details of that tectonic dance in 1-million-year increments—practically a frame-by-frame recap of geologic time. It shows that the plates speed up, slow down, and move around in unexpectedly short bursts of activity. It also suggests that researchers may have to rethink what drives much of that incessant motion.  The new model shows that although plates usually creep along at an average speed of about 4 centimeters per year, some can reach much faster speeds in short sprints. For example, India, which broke off the east coast of Africa about 120 million years and is now plowing into Asia, reached speeds as high as 20 centimeters per year for a relatively brief 10 million years."


Tagstectonicsphysicalgeomorphology, video.


Via Seth Dixon
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Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, April 27, 5:52 PM

"Los geocientíficos han dado a conocer un modelo de computadora que asigna los detalles de esa danza tectónico en 1 millón de años incrementos de una recapitulación fotograma a fotograma de tiempo geológico. Esto demuestra que las placas aceleran, frenan, y se mueven alrededor de pequeños estallidos de actividad. también sugiere que los investigadores pueden tener que repensar lo que impulsa gran parte de ese movimiento incesante. El nuevo modelo muestra que, aunque por lo general se arrastran a lo largo de las placas a una velocidad media de unos 4 centímetros por año, algunos pueden alcanzar velocidades mucho más rápidas en carreras cortas. Por ejemplo, la India, que estalló frente a la costa oriental de África a unos 120 millones de años y ahora está arando en Asia, alcanza velocidades de hasta 20 centímetros por año durante un tiempo relativamente breves 10 millones años ".

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DigitalGlobe opens access to satellite data to support disaster response efforts in Nepal | Seeing a better world™

Crowdsourcing campaign underway to catalog earthquake’s
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Experts gathered in Nepal a week ago to ready for earthquake

Experts gathered in Nepal a week ago to ready for earthquake | Lorraine's Landforms and Landscapes | Scoop.it
KATHMANDU – Nepal’s devastating earthquake was the disaster experts knew was coming.
Just a week ago, about 50 earthquake and social scientists from around the world came to Kathmandu, Nepal, to figure out how to get this poor, congested, overdeveloped, shoddily built area to prepare better for the big one, a repeat of the 1934 temblor that levelled this city. They knew they were racing the clock, but they didn’t know when what they feared would strike.
“It was sort of a nightmare waiting to hap
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Extent of the Damage From the Nepal Earthquake

Extent of the Damage From the Nepal Earthquake | Lorraine's Landforms and Landscapes | Scoop.it
Maps show the epicenter of the earthquake, aftershocks and an avalanche triggered on Mount Everest.
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The Arrival of Man-Made Earthquakes

The Arrival of Man-Made Earthquakes | Lorraine's Landforms and Landscapes | Scoop.it

Un-natural hazardsUntil 2008, earthquakes in Oklahoma were rare. Now they’re a daily event, and the oil industry may be to blame.

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Un-natural hazards

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Danxia Landforms, China

Danxia Landforms, China | Lorraine's Landforms and Landscapes | Scoop.it
sixpenceee:
“Danxia Landforms, China
These colorful rock formations are the result of red sandstone and mineral deposits laid down over millions of years. Wind and rain then carved amazing shapes into...
Lorraine Chaffer's insight:

Landscape / landform diversity 

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Nicaragua unveils major canal route

Nicaragua unveils major canal route | Lorraine's Landforms and Landscapes | Scoop.it

"The Nicaraguan government and the company behind plans to build a canal linking the Atlantic and the Pacific Ocean have settled on a route."


Via Seth Dixon, Lorraine Chaffer
Lorraine Chaffer's insight:

Human activities change landforms and landscapes

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Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, February 9, 1:22 PM

The environmental concern is really the only issue I see with this project.  For an extremely poor country, this could be a huge boost to its economy, infrastructure, and overall spirit.  If the proper steps are taken, I feel very optimistic and happy for Nicaragua.  But anytime politicians and big business are involved you always have to tread lightly.  Only time will tell.

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, February 11, 10:25 PM

Im sure that they believe that building this canal will take the country out of its financial disaster.  Even at the expense of not having clean drinking water, they must have thought about other alternatives to help the inhabitants of Nicaragua deal with the canals arrival.  With the country being poor already, this has to be worth the risk to help bring the country and its people out of poverty.  Hopefully this doesnt only make a few people rich and leave the rest of the country in shambles.

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, March 5, 2:09 PM

This is a very ambitious project for Nicaragua.  I wonder what this will do to the economy of Panama City?  Someone will lower the fee to use their canal for the increase in traffic.  I wonder what will happen to both areas economically.  

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World population and earthquake risk mapped | maptd

World population and earthquake risk mapped | maptd | Lorraine's Landforms and Landscapes | Scoop.it
Standing out amongst mash-ups related to the recent terrible events in Japan is this striking cartogram from Benjamin Hennig of the Sasi Research Group, University of Sheffield, England.
Lorraine Chaffer's insight:

Cartogram dramatically highlights areas at risk of earthquakes 

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Tide Makes Tombolo an Island

Tide Makes Tombolo an Island | Lorraine's Landforms and Landscapes | Scoop.it
The historic abbey of Mont Saint-Michel became an island on March 21 after a rare “supertide” flooded a causeway.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 25, 11:23 AM

Coastal physical geography produces some beautiful landforms such as tombolos.  A tombolo is created when sand deposits attach an island to a larger piece of land--think of it as special type of isthmus.  Mont St. Michel (picture above) is the world’s most famous example because of the iconic walled city with crowned with a striking medieval abbey.  As the tides fluctuated, the city and abbey were alternately connected or disconnected from the mainland.  However, a ‘super-tide’ that occurs once every 18.6 years wiped out the artificial causeway stranding motorists on France's most visited tourist destination (I wouldn't mind be stranded there right about now).  


Tags: water, physical, coastal, geomorphology, landformsFrance, tourism.

West Sound Tech Assn's curator insight, March 25, 8:32 PM

Not techy but very cool!

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Augmented Reality Sandbox

"Realtime topographic contour line generation."


Via Seth Dixon
Lorraine Chaffer's insight:

Every Geography classroom needs one of these to explain topography

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David W. Deeds's curator insight, March 8, 9:44 AM

Check this out! 

Bobbi Dunham's curator insight, March 8, 10:08 AM

Well, that is just incredible. Now THAT'S a sandbox! Augmented Reality is going to be a major gamechanger.

Paul Farias's curator insight, April 9, 12:24 PM

This thing is sick! I would love to make one of these i would play with this thing for hours and I'm an adult. And they say video games are useless, the kinect can be used for things other than dance offs and such. 

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Yellowstone National Park, USA | 360 Degree Aerial Panorama | 3D Virtual Tours Around the World | Photos of the Most Interesting Places on the Earth | AirPano.com

Yellowstone National Park, USA | 360 Degree Aerial Panorama | 3D Virtual Tours Around the World | Photos of the Most Interesting Places on the Earth | AirPano.com | Lorraine's Landforms and Landscapes | Scoop.it

ONe of many fantastics Nowadays apocalyptic articles about approaching eruption of presently dormant stratovolcano, which is situated in Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming, U.S., are published more and more often. Well, just in case, we have decided to publish our heli-virtual tour around snowy Yellowstone National Park...

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Just one of many fantastic landscapes with associated landforms available as panoramas on this site 

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10(af) Landforms of Glaciation

10(af) Landforms of Glaciation | Lorraine's Landforms and Landscapes | Scoop.it
RT @BPSGeography: A2. (unit 4) fantastic website of glaciation landforms http://t.co/rXh4kGHBdJ
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Krubera, Earth's deepest cave mapped - it takes...

Krubera, Earth's deepest cave mapped - it takes... | Lorraine's Landforms and Landscapes | Scoop.it
The Krubera cave is located in the Arabika Massif mountain range on the edge of the Black Sea in Abkhazia, which some argue is part of Georgia. It is said to be bottomless, but experts have managed to map Earth’s deepest cave. Intrepid explorers have charted every known twist and turn of the ter...
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An earthquake felt across South Asia

An earthquake felt across South Asia | Lorraine's Landforms and Landscapes | Scoop.it

"The magnitude-7.8 earthquake that struck Nepal on Saturday morning destroyed parts of Kathmandu, trapped many people under rubble and killed more than 2,500 people. It was the worst to hit the country since a massive 1934 temblor killed more than 8,000."


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Aysha Maria's curator insight, Today, 1:26 AM

Sad & ill-fated..!

 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, Today, 9:48 AM

Map 8

Ana Carlott G. Ares's curator insight, Today, 10:52 AM

añada su visión ...

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#Supercontinent shapes up for another new-look Earth

#Supercontinent shapes up for another new-look Earth | Lorraine's Landforms and Landscapes | Scoop.it
Planet Earth is in the process of forming one monumental supercontinent, not unlike the ancient one known as Rodinia.
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Earthquake of 7.8 magnitude shakes Nepal, tremors felt in India

Earthquake of 7.8 magnitude shakes Nepal, tremors felt in India | Lorraine's Landforms and Landscapes | Scoop.it
The death toll from a massive 7.8 magnitude earthquake in Nepal has risen to 1341, with authorities fearful it could climb much higher.
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Ancient Collision Made Nepal Earthquake Inevitable

Ancient Collision Made Nepal Earthquake Inevitable | Lorraine's Landforms and Landscapes | Scoop.it
More than 25 million years ago, India crashed into Asia. The two land masses are still colliding today, creating the world’s highest mountains and setting off major earthquakes about every 75 years.
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Nicaragua's Controversial Canal

The proposed Nicaragua Canal could be one of the largest engineering projects in history and promises to bring thousands of jobs to the impoverished country. But the government’s secretive deal with a Chinese-led firm has some Nicaraguans raising the alarm about displacement and environmental destruction in the canal’s path.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 8, 2:52 PM

I'm fascinated by massive geo-engineering projects.  Usually, the proponents of the project will support it claiming that by reconfiguring the geographic settings it will lead to the economic growth of the country and strengthen their political situation.  Opponents cite that traditional land use patterns will get disrupted, the poor will be displaced, and the environment will be degraded. This canal is not so very different from many other geo-engineering projects in that respect.

 

Tags: transportation, Nicaragua, globalization, industry, economic, environment, political, resourcespolitical ecology.

Norka McAlister's curator insight, April 15, 10:04 PM

As globalization keeps expanding, the development of infrastructure in poor countries increases. This project of constructing a canal in Nicaragua comparable to the Panama Canal will impact communities and the environment. Also, it will claim some proprieties and relocate most of their communities. However, this project will have the most significant effect on the environment. Deforestation will be part of the project, displacing a huge part of wild animals. Local communities are concerned with the lake where part of the canal will be built and cause potential pollution to the lake. And to top it all off, it will reshape the look of natural beaches which is the essential natural resource for this communities. On the other hand, the project will create job opportunities for different communities. But, the project so far has created a lot of friction between the government and its communities. The severity of this clash has led to legal issues. These problems, however will not stop China, the major investor of the project, and globalization will continue to evolve.

Blake Joseph's curator insight, April 24, 4:38 PM

The Chinese government is seriously considering plans to build a new canal through Nicaragua that will rival the United States' Panama canal. The size of the planned canal will be much larger than the Panama canal, allowing much bigger freighters and cargo vessels to be able to pass through it to and from the Chinese mainland. While many Nicaraguans are enthusiastic about the potential jobs and money involved in the project, others can see through this and sense great problems for the country if completed. The canal would destroy many environments within Nicaragua such as Lake Nicaragua and the forest that are located nearby, displacing many people who live and depend on the area for food and work. China is fast becoming a world superpower, and is alarmingly similar to the old Soviet Union as far as a lack of environmental protection and the welfare of citizens. I fear the future environmental impact this will have on Nicaragua could be devastatingly similar to the fatal impacts of other old Soviet failures like the Aral Sea or Chernobyl (without the radioactive isotopes, of course). I think many Nicaraguans do as well.

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If all the Ice melted: National Geographic's Interactive map on Rising Seas - Geoawesomeness

If all the Ice melted: National Geographic's Interactive map on Rising Seas - Geoawesomeness | Lorraine's Landforms and Landscapes | Scoop.it
If all the ice melted: Amazing interactive map by National Geographic on the future of the world when sea levels rise.

Via Seth Dixon
Lorraine Chaffer's insight:

IMpact of climate change on landforms and landscapes 

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LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, April 5, 9:05 AM

Climate change is all about the "Pendulum Effect," where the extremes is what matters, not so much the median or average. The average may fluctuate some, but the real problem comes when the weather goes haywire. Too much water can be as destructive as too little water, and this doesn't only happen in time but in space as well, where regions get too much of one and too little of the other. We'll see strips of drought and strips of wetness, strips of cold and strips of heat, like bands across regions and across the planet. If he ice melts, the sea and fresh water strips in the ocean will keep the fresh water atop and it'll probably freeze in great bands in winter and provoke an extreme albedo effect cooling down the planet radically followed immediately by a potential mini ice age.

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Polar desert

Polar desert | Lorraine's Landforms and Landscapes | Scoop.it
A polar desert is a biome with precipitation below 250 millimeters per annum and a mean temperature during the warmest month of less than 10 degrees Celsius.

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Chris Childs's curator insight, March 31, 1:39 PM

Background info about the conditions for a polar desert

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The dark, dystopic lake filled by the world’s tech lust

The dark, dystopic lake filled by the world’s tech lust | Lorraine's Landforms and Landscapes | Scoop.it
Hidden in an unknown corner of China is a toxic, nightmarish lake created by our thirst for smartphones, gadgets and green tech, discovers Tim Maughan.
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Devastating impact of mining on landforms and landscapes

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First photographs emerge of new Pacific island off Tonga

First photographs emerge of new Pacific island off Tonga | Lorraine's Landforms and Landscapes | Scoop.it

The first photographs have emerged of a newly formed volcanic island in the Pacific Ocean after three men climbed to the peak of the land mass off the coast of Tonga. Experts believe a volcano exploded underwater and then expanded until an island formed. The island is expected to erode back into the ocean in a matter of months.


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SENAME Interactive's curator insight, March 18, 12:20 AM

Spectacular view!

Ricardo Cabeza de Vaca's curator insight, March 24, 1:38 AM

I think this is a article about how a whole new island came up from a volcanic eruption. It gets even more interesting when you realize that it will disappear in a matter of months. This article shows photographs of this new island and information about it. I thought it was pretty interesting how seabirds are already laying eggs on the island!

Jason Schneider's curator insight, April 9, 11:14 PM

As a photographer and geographer, I am fascinated by landscape photography especially GP Orbassano's photography of Tonga. According to these photographs, we see depth in the oceans based on the ocean color and we see that Tonga is an archipelago. Also, Tonga is more known for it's traveling, hiking and tourism rather than lives being spent there. The Green lake (also known as Crater lakes) in the crater of one of the islands of Tonga is a small body of water which is surrounded by land and it smells of sulphur because it's completely surrounded by a large sediment. It is caused after a volcanic eruption which is common in Tonga and it creates new land and carries out water known as green lakes.

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Fishing the old way: moves to save the Aboriginal fish traps of Western Australia – video

Fishing the old way: moves to save the Aboriginal fish traps of Western Australia – video | Lorraine's Landforms and Landscapes | Scoop.it
With several Menang fish traps spread across the Albany region, Harley Coyne is spearheading work to have the sites preserved for visitors and locals alike
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Indigenous environmental management - evidence of landscape use and management 

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Ten years after the disaster: Tsunami-Early Warning System for the Indian Ocean

Ten years after the disaster: Tsunami-Early Warning System for the Indian Ocean | Lorraine's Landforms and Landscapes | Scoop.it

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oyndrila's curator insight, January 3, 11:28 AM

A successful Tsunami warning system has the potential to reduce the vulnerability of the people living along the Bay of Bengal coast, India.

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Volcanic hazard event

Volcanic hazard event | Lorraine's Landforms and Landscapes | Scoop.it

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oyndrila's curator insight, November 11, 2014 5:14 AM

The slow onset of the volcanic eruption on the Big Island of Hawaii.