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Expansive Eco-Architecture Complex Planned for New Orleans

Expansive Eco-Architecture Complex Planned for New Orleans | Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations | Scoop.it

Three ambitious architectural firms have set out on a task to re-develop New Orleans with a 30-million-square-foot triangular architectural complex on the Mississippi riverfront. Dubbed NOAH, or New Orleans Archology Habitat, the hurricane-proof complex will carry 20,000 residential units, three hotels, 1 million square feet of commercial space and enough space for cultural facilities and offices.

The complex will feature green systems, including solar panels, wind turbines, water turbines, fresh water recovery systems and a passive solar glazing system. While still in the planning phases, the project is an example of how architecture should be capable of generating enough power to fuel more than it consumes. 


Via Lauren Moss
Lorraine Chaffer's insight:

Eco developments making cities sustainable

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Catalyst: Future Cities - ABC TV Science

Catalyst: Future Cities - ABC TV Science | Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations | Scoop.it

The media abounds with visions of gloomy, automated megacities or totally sustainable ecological utopias but how do these futuristic visions relate to the development of Australian cities over the next eighty years?
With soaring populations, how will we keep our cities liveable? And what will the city of tomorrow look like? Catalyst reporter, Anja Taylor explores some innovative ideas to enhance our future cities.

Lorraine Chaffer's insight:

Future Cities 

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8 ideas for the future of cities

8 ideas for the future of cities | Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations | Scoop.it

In 2012, the TED Prize was awarded to an idea: The City2.0, a place to celebrate actions taken by citizens around the world to make their cities more livable, beautiful and sustainable. This week, The City2.0 website evolves. On the relaunched TEDCity2.org, you’ll find great talks on topics like housing, education and food, and how they relate to life in the bustling metropolis. You’ll find video explorations of 10 award-winning local projects that received funding through this TED Prize wish, and resources for those hoping to spark change in their own cities. The site will also be the home of all future TEDCity2.0 projects. In other words, it’s an online haven for everyone who wants to create the city of the future.


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Is New York City ready for future natural disasters? Join our investigation

Is New York City ready for future natural disasters? Join our investigation | Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations | Scoop.it
Welcome to our new series, where a NYC resident makes sense of the network protecting her from the next Sandy-sized storm … by interviewing the people preparing for it
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Slum developments across the world - 21st Century Challenges - Royal Geographical Society with IBG

Slum developments across the world - 21st Century Challenges - Royal Geographical Society with IBG | Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations | Scoop.it
Learn about the slums, favelas and barrios that are growing in many cities across the world
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The largest city in Brazil is running dangerously low on water

The largest city in Brazil is running dangerously low on water | Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations | Scoop.it
Thanks to the worst drought in eight decades, millions of people in São Paulo are facing water outages.


Tags: Brazil, urban, water, urban ecology, climate change, environment depend, sustainability, agriculture, food production.


Via Seth Dixon
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Miles Gibson's curator insight, November 23, 12:30 PM

Unit 1 nature and perspectives of geography

This map shows the time lapse of a lake in Sao Paulo in Brazil and shows how the water is running low.

This relates to unit 1 because it shows the maps as It is a GPS map and a GIS layering map. This a basic definable part of this unit because of its maps, scale, sense of place, identity, and overall relativity. This is a simple GIS layering map over the Jaguari resovoir.

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, November 23, 4:59 PM

adicionar a sua visão ...

Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, November 25, 12:49 PM

Brazil’s largest city, Sao Paulo, which provides one third of the countries GPD, is now running low or water due to one of the worst droughts in 8 years. There are more than 21 million people in this city and 13 million of them are facing water outages. If it doesn't rain soon, the city could face a collapse. The city has blamed the drought of lack of water in the vapor clouds that the amazon usually provides to the city. They also blame it on deforestation and global warming. President Dilma Rousseff has questioned the cities misusage of their water supply, claiming that the city mismanaged their water supply.  

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Urbanisation

Urbanisation | Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations | Scoop.it

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dilaycock's curator insight, October 26, 10:50 PM

A number of audio and video resources on urbanisation in China.

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How to reinvent the apartment building

How to reinvent the apartment building | Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations | Scoop.it
In 1967, Moshe Safdie reimagined the monolithic apartment building, creating “Habitat ’67,” which gave each unit an unprecedented sense of openness. Nearly 50 years later, he believes the need for this type of building is greater than ever. In this short talk, Safdie surveys a range of projects that do away with the high-rise and let light permeate into densely-packed cities.
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Then & Now: The Stunning Speed of Urban Development

Then & Now: The Stunning Speed of Urban Development | Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations | Scoop.it
Cities can sprout from a swath of desert to a bustling metropolis in the blink of an eye - just look at these before and after images of Dubai, Shenzhen & more.
Lorraine Chaffer's insight:

Urbanisation 

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How Much Space Do Cars Take? Cyclists Demonstrate How Bicycles Fight Congestion

How Much Space Do Cars Take? Cyclists Demonstrate How Bicycles Fight Congestion | Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations | Scoop.it

People that commute by car spend an inordinate amount of time staring at taillights. There’s no way they’re getting around that traffic in front of them. But what about bike commuters? This group of Latvian cyclists recently created a powerful demonstration of the large footprint created by cars that carry just one occupant.


The four cyclists strapped on fragile frameworks shaped like cars, then hopped into the local traffic in Riga to show how much room they would occupy on their daily commute. The difference communicates loud and clear: if these cyclists were actually in cars, they would seriously add to congestion.


Via Lauren Moss
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Russell Roberts's curator insight, October 17, 12:23 PM

Interesting study from Latvia.  Something to think about when fossil fuels  run out or become too expensive to buy. Protection from bad weather is a definite plus for cars.  Or, you could have commuters park their cars in a municipal lot and use bikes to reach their workplaces once they enter the city.  Aloha, Russ.

Jim Gramata's curator insight, October 27, 10:49 AM

Visually compelling look at the power of the bike commute 

Agence Relations d'Utilité Publique's curator insight, November 24, 5:06 AM

Les images parlent d'elles même...

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Is Alaska the new Florida? Experts predict where next for America's 'climate refugees'

Is Alaska the new Florida? Experts predict where next for America's 'climate refugees' | Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations | Scoop.it
Jennifer A Kingson reports that rising temperatures could spark massive population shifts across the United States

Via geographil
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projections of future population distribution and settlement patterns due to climate change 

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, September 28, 6:00 PM

Projections for future population distribution and settlement patterns in the USA due to primate change. 

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Copenhagen's 'Bicycle Snake': Aiming to Become ...

Copenhagen's 'Bicycle Snake': Aiming to Become ... | Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations | Scoop.it

Creatng The Ambitious Cykelslangen by DISSING+WEITLING enables Copenhagen's vision to become the best cycling city in the world by the end of 2015. The 235-meter-long orange snake meanders 5.5 meters high above sea level from Havneholmen through the mall Fisketorvet, ending at Kalvebod Brygge. This “snak...

Lorraine Chaffer's insight:

Improving liveability and sustainability of urban places 

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The impacts of migration on the sending country


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oyndrila's curator insight, August 20, 11:35 AM

Useful article on push factors of migration and the resultant impact of migration on the sending country.

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A Concept ‘Vertical City’ Skyscraper That Supports An Ecosystem

A Concept ‘Vertical City’ Skyscraper That Supports An Ecosystem | Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations | Scoop.it

London-based design and academic research architecture practice SURE Architecture has designed and developed a concept skyscraper with multiple functions.
Called ‘Endless City’, the organic skyscraper is built around six steel tubes with an “endless” ramp that goes around the building from the ground floor, all the way up to the top. 
It also features energy-saving and waste management elements that give the building another purpose—supporting an ecosystem. Plazas and communal spaces will occupy most parts of the skyscraper. 
According to the architects, the shape of the skyscraper “attempts to maximize passive energy and reduce artificial lighting and ventilation”...


Via Lauren Moss
Lorraine Chaffer's insight:

Future sustainability - urban architecture

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Norm Miller's curator insight, August 18, 2:15 PM

This is not yet a real building, only a concept but it does continue the idea of integrating natural processes.

Grant Graves's curator insight, August 21, 10:21 AM

Cities of the future will evolve as our ideals and control of the world change. Future cities as such would not have traffic jams , population woes, congestion, and many other issues that near all cities of today face. In this manner, cities will be designed for the ever changing needs of humans.  These cities will probably be build from the ground up instead of in an existing town or city. Overall, the future in these directions, will allow for a better advancement of the human race as a whole. -GG

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 24, 9:39 PM

Future sustainability - urban architecture

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This brilliant illustration shows how much public space we've surrendered to cars

This brilliant illustration shows how much public space we've surrendered to cars | Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations | Scoop.it
How lopsided the the proportions of an urban street corner really are.


Most roads in the US are built for cars, not for pedestrians. Whether we're happy or unhappy with this, most of us are aware of it.

But this brilliant illustration, made by Swedish artist Karl Jilg and commissioned by the Swedish Road Administration, shows just how extreme the situation truly is — even in an urban business district that's designed with pedestrians in mind. 


Tags: urban, transportation, planning, art.


Via Seth Dixon
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Embracing the Future: the Smartest Cities In The World

Embracing the Future: the Smartest Cities In The World | Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations | Scoop.it
These cities that are doing the best at embracing the future are focusing on improving technology, equality, sharing, civic participation, and more.

Over the past several years, the idea of the being "smart" has emerged as a key mechanism for cities to find innovative solutions to the challenges that they are facing. Increased demand for infrastructure, housing, transportation, jobs, energy, food and water are all straining city governments and infrastructure, as people around the world flock to urban centers in hopes of a better life and more opportunity. For many years, the push to create smarter cities was led by technology companies looking for uses (and buyers) for their products. But in recent years, cities have begun to think more holistically about what being a smart city could mean, and have innovated new ways to modernize how a city serves its citizens.


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Irina Miroshnikova's curator insight, December 6, 3:16 AM

добавить ваше понимание ...

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Can we climate-proof cities? Six of the best conclusions from SXSW Eco 2014

Can we climate-proof cities? Six of the best conclusions from SXSW Eco 2014 | Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations | Scoop.it
City links: This week we were at the SXSW Eco conference in Austin, Texas, thinking about the future of cities amid climate change. Here are some of the best of the (many) conclusions
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40 Percent Of The World's Cropland Is In Or Near Cities

40 Percent Of The World's Cropland Is In Or Near Cities | Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations | Scoop.it
Just how much of the world's cropland can we really call urban? That's been a big mystery until now.


Now, a study published in the journal Environmental Research Letters has an answer: Somewhere around 1.1 billion acres is being cultivated for food in or within about 12 miles (20 kilometers) of cities. Most of that land is on the periphery of cities, but 16.6 percent of these urban farms are in open spaces within the municipal core.


Via Seth Dixon
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Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 26, 1:43 PM

Is this a surprise?

Bella Reagan's curator insight, November 28, 5:57 PM

Unit 1-Nature and perspectives on geography

 

This article explains how rural and urban areas are in the same nature. rural lands and urban lands are close or combined with each other though farms. These farms are affecting cities when they are so close from the sharing of resources. Water is a problem in these places through water scarcity. Places already with lack of water now are sharing with farms just outside the city. 

 

This relates to the unit through judging both perspectives or rural and urban societies working and living together. The urban societies are affected especially when water is a problem alone and then has to be shared with farms. People have noticed many farms are near cities with 80 percent of these rural lands near urban civilizations. Although many people have different views on what is considered urban,  and if these farms really are in urban areas. 

Sreya Ayinala's curator insight, November 30, 10:04 PM

Unit 5 Agricultural and Rural Land Use

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Urbanisation Up Close - Speaking of Medicine

Urbanisation Up Close - Speaking of Medicine | Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations | Scoop.it
Jocalyn Clark @jocalynclark discusses the urbanisation of the world’s population and its impact on global health. Image credit: joiseyshowaa, Flickr Undeni

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Megacities Interactives

Megacities Interactives | Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations | Scoop.it

"By 2025, the developing world, as we understand it now, will be home to 29 megacities. We explore the latest UN estimates and forecasts on the growth of these 'cities on steroids', and take a look at the challenges and opportunities megacities present for the tens of millions living in Lagos, Mexico City and Dhaka."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 27, 8:53 AM

Through this BBC interactive mapping feature with rich call-out boxes, the reader can explore the latest UN estimates and forecasts on the growth of megacities (urban areas with over 10 million residents).  These 'cities on steroids' have been growing tremendously since the 1950s and present a unique set of geographic challenges and opportunities for their residents.   Also, this Smithsonian Magazine interactive (also on the rise of Megacities), argues that dealing with megacities is one of the traits of the Anthropocene. 


Download the BBC data as a CSV file to be able to import this into a customizable ArcGIS online map.  This will help you to create an analytical storymap (but I still enjoy a good narrative storymap).  


Tags: urban, megacitiesESRI, anthropocene, CSV.

Gilbert Faure au nom de l'ASSIM's curator insight, October 27, 3:40 PM

and wuhan inside

Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 11:48 AM

This article asks and answered the question of how and when we will reach a time and place where we live will be limited (as we weigh down the world)? -UNIT 1

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The sponge city effect: who is left when townspeople leave for bigger centres

The sponge city effect: who is left when townspeople leave for bigger centres | Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations | Scoop.it
IN Jeparit's post-war heyday, according to lifelong residents David and Marie Livingston, the town's main street was home to 50 shops.
Lorraine Chaffer's insight:

Consequences of urbanisation for rural settlements

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Smelly, contaminated, full of disease: the world’s open dumps are growing

Smelly, contaminated, full of disease: the world’s open dumps are growing | Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations | Scoop.it
Almost 40% of the world’s waste ends up in huge rubbish tips, mostly found near urban populations in poor countries, posing a serious threat to human health and the environment. John Vidal reports

Via dilaycock
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Consequences of urbanisation in developing countries 

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, October 21, 11:27 PM

Option topic: Urban environmental change and management

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Four essentials for a Bikeable urban community

Four essentials for a Bikeable urban community | Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations | Scoop.it

Via oyndrila
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Sustainability and liveability of urban communities 

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oyndrila's curator insight, September 14, 12:28 PM

An excellent infographic to understand the conditions necessary to develop a sustainable  system of transport using bicycles.

Benjamin Ewart's curator insight, September 25, 11:44 PM

Bikeability of the city...looking at Place and Liveability through perspectives (Sustainability and Scale)

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Sydney among the Western world's worst cities for traffic congestion, report reveals

Sydney among the Western world's worst cities for traffic congestion, report reveals | Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations | Scoop.it
Sydneysiders stuck in peak-hour traffic this afternoon will have plenty of time to ponder this: the city has been ranked as the seventh worst in the world for road congestion, sitting just behind the traffic snarl that is Los Angeles.

Via dilaycock
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Consequences of urbanisation


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dilaycock's curator insight, September 1, 12:38 AM

The traffic problems in Sydney are far less during school holidays. Has anyone considered that changing school hours might relieve traffic congestion/chaos?

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Hamburg Aims To Be Car-Free In 20 Years

Hamburg Aims To Be Car-Free In 20 Years | Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations | Scoop.it
In order create what will someday be a large green network, local authorities are to connect pedestrian and cycle lanes; this is expected to smooth inner city traffic flow.

To live in this age is an exciting time. The technological advances have accelerated communication around the world, and in effect, a shifting of resources to more sustainable alternatives continue to be implemented at an increasing rate. Who knew thirty or even fifty years ago that cars would so quickly go out of fashion in favor of more sustainable, alternative modes of transportation?

Yet this is exactly what is happening in the German town of Hamburg. The city council recently disclosed it has plans to divert most of its cars away from the city’s main thoroughfares in twenty years. In order create what will someday be a large green network, local authorities are to connect pedestrian and cycle lanes; this is expected to smooth inner city traffic flow.


Via ParadigmGallery, Lauren Moss
Lorraine Chaffer's insight:

Strategies for sustainable urban places - European example 

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ParadigmGallery's curator insight, May 12, 3:54 PM

 

Locations all around the world are submitting to greener design and methods of living that will support future generations to come. Hamburg is just one of many examples that will likely influence a change in the current system. -

Judit Urquijo's curator insight, June 17, 6:52 AM

La ciudad de Hamburgo (Alemania) se ha propuesto eliminar los automóviles de su centro urbano en el plazo de 20 años


Se trata sin duda de un ambicioso plan para una ciudad con un área metropolitana en la que conviven 5 millones de personas (datos de 2012). Este proyecto, denominado "Green Network", que se enmarca dentro de una estrategia orientada a paliar los efectos del cambio climático, tiene como principales ejes vertebradores una red de caminos verdes de carácter peatonal y ciclable que unirán los extrarradios con el centro urbano. Esta red estará complementada por un sistema de transporte público que tendrá por sello su eficiencia. 


En este sentido, Hamburgo cuenta con ciertas ventajas. Aproximadamente el 8% del área metropolitana es reserva natural, ya que el curso del río Elba ha creado una notable diversidad de hábitats que propician esta protección. Además, el 40% de su extensión está cubierta por zonas verdes que, con la ejecución de este plan, se verán ampliadas. 


¿Utopía? El crecimiento urbanístico experimentado por nuestras ciudades ha hecho del automóvil particular una necesidad. Pero el problema es de conciencia. Nos hemos acostumbrado a querer llegar hasta el kilómetro cero sentados al volante, a pesar del tiempo y el dinero que se consume en esta tarea a veces titánica. Por tanto, para llevar a cabo un proyecto como el que se está ideando en Hamburgo es vital un proceso de reeducación tendente a crear un nuevo modelo de ciudad, pero el mismo debe gestarse desde la propia persona consciente de la huella que produce y no desde la prohibición. Y no todo el mundo estará dispuesto a someterse y a colaborar.


Quizás, por tanto, sean más factibles otras alternativas como las que propone Harald N. Rostvik, que aboga por que sean los coches eléctricos de pequeño tamaño los que reinen en la ciudad en un sistema de car-sharing. 


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