Lorraine's Austra...
Follow
Find
417 views | +1 today
Rescooped by Lorraine Chaffer from Geography Education
onto Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations
Scoop.it!

What Pollution? Hong Kong Tourists Pose With Fake Skyline

What Pollution? Hong Kong Tourists Pose With Fake Skyline | Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations | Scoop.it
Picture this: Tourists visiting one of your city's most prominent attractions are unable to see it because of smog, haze and a bevy of other airborne pollutants. What's the solution?

Via Seth Dixon
Lorraine Chaffer's insight:

Conseqences of urbanisation - fake views

more...
Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 11:16 AM

This picture alone is worth a thousand words, I mean how bad does the pollution have to be that there are actually stands with what the skyline should look like as opposed to the poluted REAL skyline behind it. This is insane that this is an actual exhibit. Thats like putting a cardboard cut out of the Effile Tower or Big Ben and saying it is the same thing, when next to eachother their is a real clear difference.  It has me thinking is this what we all will have to resort to when pollution and other drastic changes happen, to recreate an image?

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 3:38 PM

This is just wrong in so many ways. Instead of acknowledging that there is a serious problem causing untold health problems for the population of Hong Kong, they just put up a pretty picture to distract everyone. How is that going to help the city?

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 6:29 PM

This is cool. Why not take a fake picture of the beautiful background? Maybe because the background is actually filled with so much smog you can barely see it.

Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Lorraine Chaffer from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Nicaragua unveils major canal route

Nicaragua unveils major canal route | Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations | Scoop.it

"The Nicaraguan government and the company behind plans to build a canal linking the Atlantic and the Pacific Ocean have settled on a route."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 8, 9:04 AM

A Chinese firm (HKND) is planning to construct a canal to rival Panama's.  I've been following this issue as I prepared to co-author an article  for Maps 101 with Julie Dixon and it is clearly a major environmental issue.  However, this issue is much more geographic than just the angle; China and Nicaragua are vying for greater control and access to the shipping lanes that dominate the global economy and international trade.  This shows that they are each attempting to bolster their regional and international impact compared to their rivals (the United States for China and Panama for Nicaragua).   


Tags: transportation, Nicaragua, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

Richard Lloyd Thomas's curator insight, July 29, 4:55 AM

Now, who will pay for it?

Rescooped by Lorraine Chaffer from 2.0 Tools... and ESL
Scoop.it!

The Scarecrow

The Scarecrow | Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations | Scoop.it
An innovative aerial public transport system is being proposed in Mexico City as a way to help reduce traffic congestion and increase personal mobility. TUEP

Via The Digital Rocking Chair, Ricard Garcia
more...
Ricard Garcia's curator insight, September 17, 2013 11:08 PM

Beautiful short film where we can help our students reflect about some aspects of natural and non-natural food... nice layout!

Stormnet Media's comment, September 28, 2013 8:53 PM
Amazing piece of work. All food companies should strive to educate their potential customers with inspiring content.
Rescooped by Lorraine Chaffer from The amazing world of Geography
Scoop.it!

Migrants breathe life into ageing town


Via oyndrila
more...
oyndrila's curator insight, June 19, 10:21 AM

An excellent video on advantages of migration on the destination.

Rescooped by Lorraine Chaffer from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

An Intriguingly Detailed Animation of How People Move Around a City

An Intriguingly Detailed Animation of How People Move Around a City | Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations | Scoop.it
Watch the commuting patterns of New York, San Francisco and Los Angeles.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Tom Cockburn's curator insight, July 13, 2:49 AM

possibly useful for studying complexity

Linda Alexander's curator insight, July 13, 7:41 AM

You can actually plug-in income levels for these 3 cities and view daily commutes.  Fascinating CityLab data!

 

Bronwyn Burke's curator insight, July 13, 3:28 PM

Another fabulous post for Year 7 from Seth Dixon. An aspect of liveability  in colour!

Scooped by Lorraine Chaffer
Scoop.it!

The Poverty Priority | Global Education

The Poverty Priority | Global Education | Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations | Scoop.it
Lorraine Chaffer's insight:

Excellent section on Urbanisation in Bangladesh 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lorraine Chaffer from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Developing World Cities and Population Density

Developing World Cities and Population Density | Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations | Scoop.it
Without a question, we are living in an urban era. More people now live in cities than anywhere else on the planet and I’ve repeatedly argued that cities are our most important economic engine. As a result of these shifts, we’re seeing megacities at a scale the world has never seen before.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Mr Steven Newman's curator insight, June 26, 2:25 PM

Just a few years ago there were only  20 cities with a pop over 10 million.  I'll use this with my  10 geography class to compare Australia's population and size with these cities and  look at debates around policies.  I,ll try and get the students to debate around ecological sustainability.

Fathie Kundie's curator insight, June 27, 9:05 AM
المدن الأعلى كثافة بالسكان على مستوى العالم
Sally Egan's curator insight, June 29, 6:31 PM

Mega cities and the challenges they face for the future is focus in this article. Great statistics on populations and urban densities are also included.

Rescooped by Lorraine Chaffer from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Invasion of America

The Invasion of America | Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations | Scoop.it

This interactive map, produced by University of Georgia historian Claudio Saunt to accompany his new book West of the Revolution: An Uncommon History of 1776, offers a time-lapse vision of the transfer of Indian land between 1776 and 1887. As blue “Indian homelands” disappear, small red areas appear, indicating the establishment of reservations (above is a static image of the map; visit the map's page to play with its features).


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 18, 8:13 AM

In the past I've shared maps that show the historic expansion of the United States--a temporal and spatial visualization of Manifest Destiny.  The difference with this interactive is that the narrative focuses on the declining territory controlled by Native Americans instead of the growth of the United States.  That may seem a minor detail, but how history is told shapes our perception of events, identities and places.

 

Tags: USA, historicalmapping, visualization

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 23, 9:25 AM

unit 1 Perception and bias of maps

Tom Cockburn's curator insight, June 24, 2:51 AM

This will likely resonate with 'first peoples' everywhere

Rescooped by Lorraine Chaffer from Tools for Teachers & Learners
Scoop.it!

ElectroCity

ElectroCity | Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations | Scoop.it

ElectroCity is an online computer game that lets players manage their own virtual towns and cities. It’s great fun to play and also teaches players all about energy, sustainability and environmental management in New Zealand.


Via Nik Peachey
more...
Nik Peachey's curator insight, May 19, 7:01 AM

Great vocabulary rich educational game.

Ramon Pavia's curator insight, May 19, 11:39 PM

Great game to learn facts about costs and impacts of energy

Cindy Kroeker's curator insight, May 29, 3:03 AM

Notion: Spaces and Exchanges

 

Rescooped by Lorraine Chaffer from Year 11 Geography - Megacities
Scoop.it!

The rise of megacities - interactive

The rise of megacities - interactive | Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations | Scoop.it
By 2025, the developing world will be home to 29 megacities.

Via @AngloCatalans, Olivia Fehon, Carolyn Sinclair
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lorraine Chaffer from Australian Curriculum Resources
Scoop.it!

The Devastating Effects of Pollution in China (Part 2/2) - YouTube

We went to the single most polluted place on earth, the coal-mining town of Linfen, China. In part 2, we check out illegal coal mines and find out what what ...

Via RPSHS Geography Year 8, Bookmarking Librarian
Lorraine Chaffer's insight:

Consequences of urbanisation

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lorraine Chaffer from The amazing world of Geography
Scoop.it!

Curitiba: a vision of urban sustainability

Curitiba: a vision of urban sustainability | Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations | Scoop.it
Jaime Lerner of Curitiba has placed the city on the map as a leading global example in urban sustainability. During his three terms as mayor of Curitiba and governor of Paraná, he and his team made great strides both in protecting the environment and in elevating the spirit of the city.

Via oyndrila
more...
oyndrila's curator insight, June 15, 10:59 PM

Curitiba is an excellent example of how sustainable cities can be developed in rapidly urbanizing countries of the developing world.

Rescooped by Lorraine Chaffer from Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 7 : Place and Liveability
Scoop.it!

Short Sharp Science: Megacity China: the ultimate in urban migration

Short Sharp Science: Megacity China: the ultimate in urban migration | Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations | Scoop.it

Via geographil, Lorraine Chaffer
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lorraine Chaffer from Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 10 Environmental Change & Management
Scoop.it!

Photos de Google Earth dans Google+

Animated GIFs of Earth Over Time (7 photos)
more...
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 30, 2013 11:59 PM

Fantastic time lapse images to introduce Unit 1 Year 10 .

Scooped by Lorraine Chaffer
Scoop.it!

Real-life Atlantis? The world's megacities that are sinking 10 times faster than water levels are rising

Real-life Atlantis? The world's megacities that are sinking 10 times faster than water levels are rising | Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations | Scoop.it
Scientists have issued a new warning to the world’s coastal megacities that the threat from subsiding land is a more immediate problem than rising sea levels caused by global warming.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lorraine Chaffer from Geography in the classroom
Scoop.it!

With 25 million people, Delhi is facing urbanisation crisis

With 25 million people, Delhi is facing urbanisation crisis | Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations | Scoop.it
Cities like Delhi cannot accommodate so many people and are not developing fast enough

Via dilaycock
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lorraine Chaffer from Geography in the classroom
Scoop.it!

World cities, home to most people, to add 2.5 billion more by 2050: U.N.

World cities, home to most people, to add 2.5 billion more by 2050: U.N. | Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations | Scoop.it
UNITED NATIONS (Reuters) - More than half of the world's seven billion people live in urban areas, with the top mega cities - with more than 10 million inhabitants - being Tokyo, Delhi, Shanghai, Mexico

Via dilaycock
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lorraine Chaffer from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Drought Drains Lake Mead to Lowest Level

Drought Drains Lake Mead to Lowest Level | Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations | Scoop.it

"The largest reservoir in the U.S. falls to its lowest water level in history, Nevada State Sen. Tick Segerblom introduced a bill title and issued a press release on July 8 calling for an 'independent scientific and economic audit of the Bureau of Reclamation’s strategies for Colorado River management.'"


This week’s history-making, bad-news event at Lake Mead has already triggered lots of news stories, but almost all of these stories focus on the water supply for Las Vegas, Phoenix and California. But what about the health of the river itself?


Tags: physicalfluvial, drought, water, environment.


Via Seth Dixon
Lorraine Chaffer's insight:

Consequences of urbanisation 

more...
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, July 12, 12:10 AM

Option topic : Inland water and management

Tom Franta's curator insight, July 12, 8:40 AM

Many geographers are aware that future water resource issues in the American Southwest will have political, cultural, and social impacts.  What do you believe to be some approaching concerns after reading this article?

Rescooped by Lorraine Chaffer from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

This Is the Traffic Capital of the World

This Is the Traffic Capital of the World | Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations | Scoop.it
There are only 650 major intersections here—but somehow only 60 traffic lights.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Teresa Gallego Navarro's curator insight, July 7, 3:43 AM

¿movilidad urbana?  -¿algo habrá que gestionar aquí?

 

Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, July 7, 7:45 AM

seth dixon:This is an excellent article to explore some of the problems confronting megacities.

Jade ten Kate's curator insight, July 9, 10:01 PM

Megacities

Rescooped by Lorraine Chaffer from IB GEOGRAPHY URBAN ENVIRONMENTS LANCASTER
Scoop.it!

Where Cities Are Growing Faster Than Their Suburbs

Where Cities Are Growing Faster Than Their Suburbs | Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations | Scoop.it
In 19 of the 51 largest U.S. metros, including knowledge centers like New York and Austin, the city grew faster than the suburbs last year.

Via geographil
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lorraine Chaffer from Eclectic Technology
Scoop.it!

Intrinsic Motivation for the Classroom

Intrinsic Motivation for the Classroom | Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations | Scoop.it
Bring on the i. I just finished reading several books about intrinsic motivation. None of the research is new, so why aren't we incorporating intrinsic motivation into the classroom more? Here are ...

Via Beth Dichter
more...
Agisa Abdulla's curator insight, June 21, 8:44 PM

authentic learning can happen with intrinsic motivation

Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, June 26, 11:34 PM

I love this break down! Which motivation technique inspires learners  the best? Can both be meaningful and why? Which technique do you feel Common Core applies most heavily?

Raquel Oliveira's curator insight, July 2, 4:01 PM

ahhh...esse tal MOTIvo para AÇÃO... vale a pena conhecer mais a respeito para auxiliar os aprendizes a encontrarem o seu próprio caminho: interiormente ou exteriormente ?


Rescooped by Lorraine Chaffer from Fantastic Maps
Scoop.it!

What London Would Look Like If the Thames Barrier Failed

What London Would Look Like If the Thames Barrier Failed | Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations | Scoop.it
What could be the worst tidal surge in six decades has swamped parts of the U.K. but not London, thanks to the miraculous Barrier.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lorraine Chaffer from Year 11 Geography - Megacities
Scoop.it!

China Plans to Move 250 Million into Cities by 2025

China Plans to Move 250 Million into Cities by 2025 | Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations | Scoop.it
The old buildings under these high-rises in Chongqing have been marked for demolition. © Justin Jin for The New York Times The Chinese government is

Via Olivia Fehon, Carolyn Sinclair
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lorraine Chaffer from Australian Curriculum Resources
Scoop.it!

Diversity, identity and Australian culture

Diversity, identity and Australian culture | Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations | Scoop.it
This teacher resource focuses on immigration and settlement patterns in Australia. It explores the migration experience,...

Via Bookmarking Librarian
Lorraine Chaffer's insight:

International migration to Australia

more...
Bookmarking Librarian's curator insight, June 17, 7:53 PM

Australian curriculum: intercultural understanding; migration; Australian culture

Karen Bonanno's curator insight, June 18, 1:44 PM

Also applies to a cross curriculum focus.

Rescooped by Lorraine Chaffer from Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 7 : Place and Liveability
Scoop.it!

India's Census: Lots Of Cellphones, Too Few Toilets

The results of India's once-in-a-decade census reveal a country of 1.2 billion people where millions have access to the latest technology, but millions more lack sanitation and drinking water.

 

More Indians are entering the middle class as personal wealth is transforming South Asia's economy in the private sector.  Yet the government's ability to provide public services to match that growth still lags behind.  Why would it be that it is easier to get a cell phone than a toilet in India?  What will that mean for development?  


Via Seth Dixon, Lorraine Chaffer
Lorraine Chaffer's insight:

Consequences of urbanisation

more...
Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, December 11, 2013 4:34 PM


This caught my attention because how does everyone have access to so many new things. It is great that there economy is growing but not everyone is part of the growth. But what surprises me that people that owns phones but do not have a bathroom with functioning toilets. The government seems to be falling behind on the high demand of sanitation. People are even not inviting their family members over because of that reason. The government needs to step up it game because more and more people are being born and they might have to go through what some people are going through now.

Paige McClatchy's curator insight, December 14, 2013 1:45 PM

This NPR podast reflects the geographic theme of development, specifically the uneven development of India. Despite a rising economy, the infrastructure of the country is not keeping up. While many people buy things, have "personal wealth," they live in conditions that betray their poverty.

Paige Therien's curator insight, April 17, 10:41 AM

India's economy is transforming, but only for individuals, who are quickly becoming rich or, more commonly, part of the growing middle class.  This change, mixed with a corrupt, non-incentivized  government is creating a picture of uneven development in India.  The government is not supplying basic needs to the growing population, which mainly effects the poor.  Half of the population are lacking basic sanitation and access to clean water.  These needs can only be met with a strong infrastructure, which the government has neither the money nor the motivation to rebuild.  However, Indians do have the access to things like cellphones and televisions.  This is due to the fact that these goods are privatized and easy to obtain (as opposed to ripping apart a city to put infrastructure in place).  So, uneven development is seen not only in the general economy, but also in access to resources and material goods. 

Rescooped by Lorraine Chaffer from Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 7 : Place and Liveability
Scoop.it!

China struggles with growing urbanisation

China struggles with growing urbanisation | Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations | Scoop.it
The country wants to become a modern society with a strong middle class, but can this be done without everyone on board?

Via geographil, Lorraine Chaffer
more...
No comment yet.