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American Centroid Helps To Trace Path Of U.S. Migration

American Centroid Helps To Trace Path Of U.S. Migration | Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations | Scoop.it

"David Greene talks to writer Jeremy Miller about the American Centroid. That's the place where an imaginary, flat, weightless and rigid map of the U.S. would balance perfectly if all 300 million of us weighed the exact same."


Via Seth Dixon
Lorraine Chaffer's insight:

The centre of population in the USA has moved further inland and southward compared to Australia. Comparing urbanisation in USA and Australia.

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Al Picozzi's curator insight, August 4, 2013 1:45 PM

Awesome way to show how the settlement of the US continues to move west with the population growing on the West Coast at a faster rate.  If you look at the biggest jump between 1850 and 1860 it shows the mass immigration into the US and the further migration to the western part of the US especailly with the gold rush starting in 1849.  Great littel piece of information.

Blake Welborn's curator insight, November 11, 2013 10:33 PM

Informative, short podcast that details the changing migration of the US. This allows for the comparison of migration and time and the effects of migration over the years in the US. 

Emily Bian's curator insight, October 17, 2014 7:32 PM

The center of the U.S. population moves about every 10 years. 

In our APHUG textbook, it also talked about the center moving west. It also talks about the patterns and shifts of migration in the U.S going more west and south now, than before. I wonder if the trend will continue?  

It relates because we talked about this map in APHUG class, and it was in the textbook. The population trend is moving Southwest.

This is interesting for next year's APHUG students, because they get to see a population trend right in the US! It's a good article to think about why population trends are the way it is.

2) migration

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Equal Streets movement in Mumbai.

Equal Streets movement in Mumbai. | Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations | Scoop.it

Via oyndrila
Lorraine Chaffer's insight:
Strategies to make urban places more liveable
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oyndrila's curator insight, March 29, 4:49 AM

Raahgiri in New Delhi and Gurgaon, Happy street in Park street Kolkata are some initiatives by urban citizens of India. It is nice to know that the urban dwellers are claiming open space from traffic laden roads as these cities are sometimes starved off open space due to rapid urbanisation.However, some local residents and commuters are being hassled due to this open street movement.

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Fewer trees leave the outer suburbs out in the heat

Fewer trees leave the outer suburbs out in the heat | Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations | Scoop.it
When you look out of your window in the morning, how many trees do you see? Your answer might depend on what suburb you live in. As you go further from the city centre, the amount of tree cover in a suburb…

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The Cost of Sprawl: A Visual Comparison

The Cost of Sprawl: A Visual Comparison | Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations | Scoop.it

The cost of sprawl is 2.5 times more expensive than the compact city.

Sidewalks, water and wastewater pipes, schools and libraries, police and fire protection, and of course, roads. And whether the costs are paid by the homeowner, the local government, or businesses, the lower density in the suburbs leads to higher costs to operate, maintain and replace all these services...


Via Lauren Moss
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Cluster Eco-Habitat's curator insight, March 10, 3:33 AM

L'étalement urbain, une de nos spécialités en Poitou-Charentes a un surcoût concernant les services et bien sûr environnemental.

Bonne illustration de cela

Bella The Non-Vampire's curator insight, March 10, 10:12 AM

     Sprawl is the spread of development over the landscape. For suburban areas it's going to be more expensive than urban areas. Sprawl in suburban areas would overall take more time in making it more as an urban area. Making urban areas more industrial is going to be a lot easier especially since the area has already been industrialized. 

I.C.

Eben Lenderking's curator insight, March 11, 8:22 AM

Pile 'em high

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The lone Sydney suburb where Chinese ancestry reigns

The lone Sydney suburb where Chinese ancestry reigns | Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations | Scoop.it

iMpact of migration on Australian communitiesHurstville, 16 kilometres west of Sydney's CBD, occupies a unique spot on our demographic map.

Lorraine Chaffer's insight:

Contribution of migration to Australian communities / urban placers

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10328x7760 - A 10K Timelapse Demo

Great urbanisation "10328x7760 - A 10K Timelapse Demo" is a video I put together showcasing the extreme resolution of the PhaseOne IQ180 camera of which it was shot. This footage comes…

Lorraine Chaffer's insight:

Great images for urbanisation - megacities etc 

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Where China’s future will happen

Where China’s future will happen | Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations | Scoop.it

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oyndrila's curator insight, December 22, 2014 10:44 AM

An insightful article that examines the process of urbanisation in China.

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The Bicycle Snake - Danish Architecture Centre

The Bicycle Snake - Danish Architecture Centre | Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations | Scoop.it
Copenhagen's new cycle bridge The Bicycle Snake will complete the journey over the Bryggebro Bridge, offering Copenhagen's cyclists a fun ride along the harbour and past its tower blocks at first-floor level. As part of Copenhagen's strategy to be one of the best cycling cities in the world, the new cycle bridge will guarantee cyclists improved accessibility and connection to the city.
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China’s Pearl River Delta overtakes Tokyo as world’s largest megacity

China’s Pearl River Delta overtakes Tokyo as world’s largest megacity | Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations | Scoop.it
Several hundred million more people are expected to move to cities in East Asia over the next 20 years as economies shift from agriculture to manufacturing and services, according to a World Bank report
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The Upcycled City: Reclaiming the Street

The Upcycled City: Reclaiming the Street | Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations | Scoop.it

Despite an admittedly strong preference for the automobile, Los Angeles and other forward-thinking cities are now re-allocating public (and private) land away from the car so that people can use the space for other purposes. 

The automobile remains the best transportation option in all but a few U.S. cities. However, we can strike a better balance with how we use the precious resource of space in our cities. By dedicating so much land to traveling comfortably and quickly by car, we miss out on using that land to create interesting places to travel to. While some communities may still require copious amounts of parking and travel lanes, others are developing different neighborhood priorities, like green space, local business presence, or better biking and walking infrastructure. We need to plan for flexibility, for the accommodation of what we cannot yet imagine.


Via Lauren Moss
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Reprogramming the City: New Opportunities for Urban Infrastructure

Reprogramming the City: New Opportunities for Urban Infrastructure | Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations | Scoop.it

Curated by urban strategist Scott Burham, the latest exhibition at theDAC explores the array of untapped potential in our urban environments. Through installations such as a light therapy bus stop and a billboard that converts humidity into drinking water, the show will consider how infrastructure can encourage human interaction, perform alternative functions or assume an entirely new role.


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Norm Miller's curator insight, December 30, 2014 3:38 PM

Design can make a huge difference in terms of livable cities.

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Sick Cities: A Scenario for Dhaka City - Our World

Sick Cities: A Scenario for Dhaka City - Our World | Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations | Scoop.it
Bangladesh's capital, Dhaka, is a 'sick city', due largely to rapid urbanization. But planning and other measures can nurse it into a sustainable urban environment.

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'Slum' is a loaded term. They are homegrown neighbourhoods

'Slum' is a loaded term. They are homegrown neighbourhoods | Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations | Scoop.it
Mumbai’s informal settlements don’t fit the apocalyptic vision we’ve been sold. In fact, they could help solve India’s housing crisis

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This brilliant illustration shows how much public space we've surrendered to cars

This brilliant illustration shows how much public space we've surrendered to cars | Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations | Scoop.it
How lopsided the the proportions of an urban street corner really are.


Most roads in the US are built for cars, not for pedestrians. Whether we're happy or unhappy with this, most of us are aware of it.

But this brilliant illustration, made by Swedish artist Karl Jilg and commissioned by the Swedish Road Administration, shows just how extreme the situation truly is — even in an urban business district that's designed with pedestrians in mind. 


Tags: urban, transportation, planning, art.


Via Seth Dixon
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Bang Kachao: Bangkok’s Green Lung

Bang Kachao: Bangkok’s Green Lung | Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations | Scoop.it

"In the heart of Thailand’s most populous city, an oasis stands out from the urban landscape like a great “green lung.” That’s the nickname given to Bang Kachao—a lush protected area that has escaped the dense development seen elsewhere in Bangkok.  The city is built on the alluvial plain of the Chao Phraya River. Toward the southern end, near the Gulf of Thailand, is an old meander that never quite formed an oxbow lake. That meander traces the boundary of Bang Kachao, which TIME magazine once called the 'best urban oasis' in Asia.  According to a travel story in The New York Times, Bang Kachao is gaining popularity among tourists lured by bike tours, a floating farmers’ market, and the relaxed atmosphere."


Tags: physical, fluvialremote sensing, land use, Thailand, Southeast Asia, urban ecology.


Via Seth Dixon
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China’s Pearl River Delta overtakes Tokyo as world’s largest megacity

China’s Pearl River Delta overtakes Tokyo as world’s largest megacity | Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations | Scoop.it
Several hundred million more people are expected to move to cities in East Asia over the next 20 years as economies shift from agriculture to manufacturing and services, according to a World Bank report

Via Seth Dixon, dilaycock
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Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 22, 1:23 PM

China's superheated economy has finally showed signs of slowing down and stabilizing to levels it can sustain. This should allow it to fix some of the marketing and authenticity issues it has with the products and services it produces. China is notorious for producing sub-standard products, and using unethical business practices like using antifreeze in toothpaste.

With growth like this, which is unprecedented in the sheer numbers of people now moving to these megalopolises, China must introduce controls that hinge on best practices for their work force, for their ecology, and for their reputation. Only when the world accepts China as an equal partner on these planks, can they be taken seriously on the world trading stage.

Who builds the infrastructure to accommodate these 200 million people moving to the large metro areas? How will they get enough supplies to undertake this enormous operation? China should go to school on such cities as Tokyo, New York City, and Mexico City to take away what worked and more importantly, what didn't....

Seth Forman's curator insight, March 23, 4:46 PM

Summary: This article talks about population density in the Chinese pearl river delta. It compares population density to other places as well as talking about how factors like urbanization effect population density.

 

Insight: This article is significant because it shows that even today physical geography can lead to urbanization and still effect population density.  

 

 

Louis Mazza's curator insight, March 26, 2:16 PM

Tokyo has been overtaken as the world’s largest megacity by China’s Pearl River Delta. The Megacity, Pearl River Delta, covers most of China’s manufacturing hotspots including cities of Shenzhen, Guangzhou, Foshan and Dongguan. This megacity now houses more people than in Canada, Argentina, or Australia. Over the next 20 years several million more people are expected to move to these East Asian Cities. The kind of urbanization that took place in Europe and Americas are starting to develop in East Asia. East Asia already contains 8 megacities and 123 cities with a population between 1-10 million people.

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Where Australia's immigrants were born: Sydney | SBS World News

Where Australia's immigrants were born: Sydney | SBS World News | Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations | Scoop.it
SBS World News Australia - bringing you the global & national news that matters. Watch SBS ONE 6.30pm nightly and 10.30pm Mon-Fri, listen at 6am & 6pm Mon-Fri.
Lorraine Chaffer's insight:

Impacts of migration on urban places

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Life in a Toxic Country

Life in a Toxic Country | Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations | Scoop.it

Consequences of uebanisatiobMy wife and I worry about how China’s bad air and food will affect our child.

Lorraine Chaffer's insight:

Consequences of urbanisation

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Stockholm's Newest Parking Garage Is Only For Bikes

Stockholm's Newest Parking Garage Is Only For Bikes | Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations | Scoop.it
700 bike spots, lockers, and showersand not an engine in sight.
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Infographic Outlines Why Green Building is Smart Building

Infographic Outlines Why Green Building is Smart Building | Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations | Scoop.it
Why build green? This infographic from Green Building Canada simply explains many of the benefits.
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Jan Gehl: Making healthy cities - Danish Architecture Centre

Jan Gehl: Making healthy cities - Danish Architecture Centre | Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations | Scoop.it
Cities of the 21st century should be lively, safe, sustainable and healthy cities. Jan Gehl tells us how all of these qualities can be achieved through the policy of making walking and cycling the preferred mode of movement in the city.
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China’s Pearl River Delta overtakes Tokyo as world’s largest megacity

China’s Pearl River Delta overtakes Tokyo as world’s largest megacity | Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations | Scoop.it
Several hundred million more people are expected to move to cities in East Asia over the next 20 years as economies shift from agriculture to manufacturing and services, according to a World Bank report

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 22, 1:23 PM

China's superheated economy has finally showed signs of slowing down and stabilizing to levels it can sustain. This should allow it to fix some of the marketing and authenticity issues it has with the products and services it produces. China is notorious for producing sub-standard products, and using unethical business practices like using antifreeze in toothpaste.

With growth like this, which is unprecedented in the sheer numbers of people now moving to these megalopolises, China must introduce controls that hinge on best practices for their work force, for their ecology, and for their reputation. Only when the world accepts China as an equal partner on these planks, can they be taken seriously on the world trading stage.

Who builds the infrastructure to accommodate these 200 million people moving to the large metro areas? How will they get enough supplies to undertake this enormous operation? China should go to school on such cities as Tokyo, New York City, and Mexico City to take away what worked and more importantly, what didn't....

Seth Forman's curator insight, March 23, 4:46 PM

Summary: This article talks about population density in the Chinese pearl river delta. It compares population density to other places as well as talking about how factors like urbanization effect population density.

 

Insight: This article is significant because it shows that even today physical geography can lead to urbanization and still effect population density.  

 

 

Louis Mazza's curator insight, March 26, 2:16 PM

Tokyo has been overtaken as the world’s largest megacity by China’s Pearl River Delta. The Megacity, Pearl River Delta, covers most of China’s manufacturing hotspots including cities of Shenzhen, Guangzhou, Foshan and Dongguan. This megacity now houses more people than in Canada, Argentina, or Australia. Over the next 20 years several million more people are expected to move to these East Asian Cities. The kind of urbanization that took place in Europe and Americas are starting to develop in East Asia. East Asia already contains 8 megacities and 123 cities with a population between 1-10 million people.

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The ghastly tragedy of the suburbs

The ghastly tragedy of the suburbs | Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations | Scoop.it
In James Howard Kunstler's view, public spaces should be inspired centers of civic life and the physical manifestation of the common good. Instead, he argues, what we have in America is a nation of places not worth caring about.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 13, 10:57 AM

Kunstler passionately argues that American architecture and urban planning are not creating public places that encourage interaction and communal engagement.  We should create more distinct places that foster a sense of place that is 'worth fighting for,' as opposed to suburbia which he sees as emblematic of these problems. 


Question to Ponder: How should we design cities to create a strong sense of place?  What elements are necessary?  Warning: He uses some strong language.  


Tagsurban, planning architecture, suburbs, TED, video.

Kevin Barker's curator insight, January 21, 9:02 AM

This could become something of a fixation for me.  Plano TX is seen on many levels of a great suburban city but here is one way it is lacking most.

Linda Denty's curator insight, February 3, 5:41 PM
Strong language used in this!
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7 Cities That Are Starting To Go Car-Free

7 Cities That Are Starting To Go Car-Free | Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations | Scoop.it
Urban planners are finally recognizing that streets should be designed for people, not careening hunks of deadly metal.

After over a hundred years of living with cars, some cities are slowly starting to realize that the automobile doesn't make a lot of sense in the urban context. It isn't just the smog or the traffic deaths; in a city, cars aren't even a convenient way to get around.

Now a growing number of cities are getting rid of cars in certain neighborhoods through fines, better design, new apps, and, in the case of Milan, even paying commuters to leave their car parked at home and take the train instead.

Unsurprisingly, the changes are happening fastest in European capitals that were designed hundreds or thousands of years before cars were ever built. In sprawling U.S. suburbs that were designed for driving, the path to eliminating cars is obviously more challenging.

Read further for more on the leaders moving toward car-free neighborhoods.


Via Lauren Moss
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Emlyn Davies-Cole's curator insight, January 21, 10:25 PM

This knowledge is not new, Architects, Urban designers, City planners, and Government officials have know of this but it has not been put to practice until now. Cities are meant to be populated with people and not dominated by four wheel vehicles.

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Can’t stand the heat? Come to world’s first climate-controlled city

Can’t stand the heat? Come to world’s first climate-controlled city | Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations | Scoop.it
Dubai has already earned a reputation for pushing the boundaries with its architecture, having built the world’s tallest building, a hotel shaped like a sail and a palm tree‑shaped archipelago of luxury properties.

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Catalyst: Future Cities - ABC TV Science

Catalyst: Future Cities - ABC TV Science | Lorraine's Australian Geography Curriculum YR 8: Changing nations | Scoop.it

The media abounds with visions of gloomy, automated megacities or totally sustainable ecological utopias but how do these futuristic visions relate to the development of Australian cities over the next eighty years?
With soaring populations, how will we keep our cities liveable? And what will the city of tomorrow look like? Catalyst reporter, Anja Taylor explores some innovative ideas to enhance our future cities.

Lorraine Chaffer's insight:

Future Cities 

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