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What Does Good Geography Teaching Look Like?

What Does Good Geography Teaching Look Like? | Lorraine's  Water in the World | Scoop.it

Seth Dixon, a Rhode Island College geography professor and the coordinator of the RI Geography Education Alliance, gave the keynote address at the Thinking Geographically about International Issues 2013 summer institute, in a talk entitled What Does Good Geography Teaching Look Like?


Via Seth Dixon
Lorraine Chaffer's insight:

This is a great video and sa reminder of how we should be approaching our teaching of the Australian Curriculum. 

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mirmilla's comment, August 2, 2013 9:13 AM
Never thought it was so interesting the ("good") geography, Thank you!
Alejandro Restrepo's comment, August 4, 2013 12:22 AM
Great work
Jarrod Dodds's curator insight, April 13, 2014 8:49 PM

In this video, Seth Dixon demonstrates a profound knowledge of geographical concepts . More importantly, it's his delivery and approach to teaching those concepts.

 

Watch this video and respond to the questions.

 

1) Highlight what methods the professor uses to engage students effectively.

 

2) Why do you think those methods are important, particularly for the subject of geography?

Lorraine's  Water in the World
Resources  linked to the Australian Curriculum Geography
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▶ Wrong Climate for Damming Rivers - YouTube

The "Wrong Climate for Damming Rivers," with Right Livelihood Award Winner Nnimmo Bassey, explores the impacts of climate change and hydropower on the world'...
Lorraine Chaffer's insight:

Australian Curriculum 

The nature of water scarcity and ways of overcoming it, including studies drawn from Australia and West Asia and/or North Africa (ACHGK040)


GeoWorld 7: Chapter 4. Nature of water scarcity and strategies (4.7 - 4.9 Dams)

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Time-Lapse Footage of a Supercell Thunderstorm

Time-Lapse Footage of a Supercell Thunderstorm | Lorraine's  Water in the World | Scoop.it
  A group of stormchasers captured some beautiful and terrifying footage of a supercell thunderstorm developing over Wyoming this weekend.   
Lorraine Chaffer's insight:

AC: The causes, impacts and responses to an atmospheric or hydrological hazard (ACHGK042)


GeoWorld 7 Chapter 6:

Chapter 6  Hydrological and atmospheric hazards and responses

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ENSO Wrap-Up

ENSO Wrap-Up | Lorraine's  Water in the World | Scoop.it
Lorraine Chaffer's insight:

Influences on weather & climate -  the water cycle. 

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After the deluge: Brisbane's new flood resilient ferry terminal

After the deluge: Brisbane's new flood resilient ferry terminal | Lorraine's  Water in the World | Scoop.it

Cox Rayner Architects and Aurecon have designed a new generation of flood-resilient ferry terminals in Brisbane.

The completed terminal at Milton is the first of many to be rolled out along the Brisbane River in 2015. The flood resilient terminal design has been inspired by the way private pontoons simply float over their piers in a flood. Michael Rayner, director of Cox Rayner, called on his own experience in the 2011 floods in designing a terminal that could also deflect debris.

The design features a pier that provides commuters with panoramic views of the Brisbane River, with the pontoon essentially tethered to the pier via the gangway. During a flood, the gangway slides across the pier as the river rises and detaches. It then swings with the current of the flood waters, secured to the side of the pontoon, to avoid the build-up of debris. The gangway incorporates a unique floor which maintains level whatever the tide. The pontoon, which is anchored at the downstream end, features a hull-shaped base that allows flood waters to flow underneath it unhindered.


Via Lauren Moss
Lorraine Chaffer's insight:

AC:The causes, impacts and responses to an atmospheric or hydrological hazard (ACHGK042)


Geoworld 7: Chapter 6. Hydrological and atmospheric hazards and responses. 6.6 Queensland's floods. 

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Kris Homann's curator insight, March 18, 3:53 AM

Brisbane has been my home for my entire adult life.  I moved here the day I graduated high school and will most likely live here the rest of my life.

 

As a city, Brisbane has had it’s fair share of major incidents, the most notable of late the 2011 floods.  In some ways, we are still feeling the flow on effects from this today, as can be seen in this article, they have had to completely redesign the ferry terminals to cope with future flood events, and as a result of the floodings, insurance companies were forced to change their policies to cover flood events .

 

Another recent OHS issue that is becoming more prominent is traffic in the city.  Roads everywhere are congested because they can’t cope with the traffic volumes, people are more and more starting to ride push bikes on roadways, that are not designed to be shared use, so the incidents of vehicle to bike accidents has skyrocketed.

 

Both the floods and the bicycle usage have caused many OHS issues to come up, some of which are how to make the roads safer, and less congested, how do we flood proof our beautiful city, and how do we do this without having a negative impact on the people who are required to do the work to implement these changes.

 

Widening roads is a dangerous situation for the workers, and one that has caused concern in the past, especially with impatient drivers who refuse to slow down through traffic works effectively putting the lives of the workers at risk.  So how do we do this safely, and how do with do it with minimal obstruction to already overturned roadways? 

 

That is something I would like to find out.

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▶ California Water Story

Lorraine Chaffer's insight:

AC:

The classification of environmental resources and the forms that water takes as a resource (ACHGK037)


The ways that flows of water connect places as it moves through the environment and the way this affects places (ACHGK038)


The nature of water scarcity and ways of overcoming it, including studies drawn from Australia and West Asia and/or North Africa (ACHGK040)


GeoWorld 7: Chapter 1: Environmental resources and water

                       Chapter 2: Values of water 

                       Chapter 4: Nature of water scarcity and strategies

                      

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▶ California's Water Crisis

Lorraine Chaffer's insight:

AC:

The classification of environmental resources and the forms that water takes as a resource (ACHGK037)


The ways that flows of water connect places as it moves through the environment and the way this affects places (ACHGK038)


The nature of water scarcity and ways of overcoming it, including studies drawn from Australia and West Asia and/or North Africa (ACHGK040)


GeoWorld 7: Chapter 1. Environmental resources and water

                       Chapter 2.Values of water 

                       Chapter 4. Nature of water scarcity and strategies

                       Chapter 5.Management strategies: making every drop count

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The geography of risk in Rwanda

The geography of risk in Rwanda | Lorraine's  Water in the World | Scoop.it
Rwanda is susceptible to a wide range of disaster threats, including floods, droughts, strong storms and volcanic eruptions. In the past two decades, some 2 million people have been affected by these and other climate-induced hazards.
Lorraine Chaffer's insight:

AC:

The nature of water scarcity and ways of overcoming it, including studies drawn from Australia and West Asia and/or North Africa (ACHGK040)

The causes, impacts and responses to an atmospheric or hydrological hazard (ACHGK042)


GeoWorld 7: Chapter 4.  Nature of water scarcity and strategies

                       Chapter 6. Hydrological and atmospheric hazards and responses

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Majority Of Earth’s Potable Water Trapped In Coca-Cola Products

Majority Of Earth’s Potable Water Trapped In Coca-Cola Products | Lorraine's  Water in the World | Scoop.it

 A report published  by Oregon State University has found that 68 percent of the earth’s supply of potable water  is trapped in Coca Cola products

Lorraine Chaffer's insight:

AC:

The classification of environmental resources and the forms that water takes as a resource (ACHGK037)

The economic, cultural, spiritual and aesthetic value of water for people, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples and peoples of the Asia region (ACHGK041)


GeoWorld 7: Chapter 2. The value of water

                       Chapter 3. WAter connects people and places

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California Moves to Kill the Lawn, Save the Water

California Moves to Kill the Lawn, Save the Water | Lorraine's  Water in the World | Scoop.it
What's it going to take to get people to use a lot less water in drought-stricken California, the Technicolor landscape of lush yards, emerald golf courses and aquamarine swimming pools?
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Waterwise The value of water

Waterwise The value of water | Lorraine's  Water in the World | Scoop.it
The village is a small habitat of about 122 people and is off a National Highway by a kilometre in parched Kolar district of Karnataka.

Via InfoBlaze
Lorraine Chaffer's insight:

AC: 

The economic, cultural, spiritual and aesthetic value of water for people, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples and peoples of the Asia region (ACHGK041)


The nature of water scarcity and ways of overcoming it, including studies drawn from Australia and West Asia and/or North Africa (ACHGK040)


GeoWorld 7: Chapter 2. Value of water  

                       Chapter 4. Nature of water scarcity and strategies

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The countries facing the worst water shortages

The countries facing the worst water shortages | Lorraine's  Water in the World | Scoop.it
Lorraine Chaffer's insight:


AC: The nature of water scarcity and ways of overcoming it, including studies drawn from Australia and West Asia and/or North Africa (ACHGK040)


GeoWorld 7: Chapter 4.  Nature of water scarcity and strategies


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The dark, dystopic lake filled by the world’s tech lust

The dark, dystopic lake filled by the world’s tech lust | Lorraine's  Water in the World | Scoop.it
Hidden in an unknown corner of China is a toxic, nightmarish lake created by our thirst for smartphones, gadgets and green tech, discovers Tim Maughan.
Lorraine Chaffer's insight:

Water pollution caused by rare earth mineral mining 

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Egypt, Ethiopia and Sudan sign deal to end Nile dispute

Egypt, Ethiopia and Sudan sign deal to end Nile dispute | Lorraine's  Water in the World | Scoop.it
Three African leaders sign an initial deal to end a long-running dispute over the sharing of Nile waters and the building of Africa's biggest hydroelectric dam.

Via Seth Dixon
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Lena Minassian's curator insight, April 8, 12:45 PM

This was an interesting read because I was not too familiar with this dispute. Three leaders have officially signed a deal to end a long dispute over sharing the Nile waters and beginning to build Africa's largest hydroelectric dam in Ethiopia. The three leaders are from Sudan, Ethiopia, and Egypt and signed the agreement in Sudan's capital city. Many feared that previous Dam's would worsen the water supply but this new Dam will give a more fairer share for everyone. These leaders assured that this new Dam will not cause any harm to the downstream countries but this project is still a ooncern for Egypt. The nile is the only source of water for some. Ethiopia has stated the the river will be diverted a little but will still follow it's natural course. Ethiopia is being backed up by many other countries as well.

David Lizotte's curator insight, April 10, 3:29 PM

The key of this article is that there has been an initial treaty signed. This agreement overturns a colonial era treaty which stated any countries upstream (south of Egypt) essentially had no right to touch the Nile in any way that would effect Egypt. They had veto power over everything. 

The reason behind this is that Ethiopia had overthrown there colonial power-Italy, in the 1890's-and was henceforth its own country. Another attempt to seize Ethiopia took place in the 1930's under Benito Mussolini's rule. Him being a fascist and wanting to be like Hitler and take everything certainly contributed to Mussolini wanting to take Ethiopia. Another contributing factor is the fact that Italy tried and failed in claiming/colonizing Ethiopia. They had lost in the battle field. Mussolini wanted to improve and prove Eastern Italian Africa's dominance. Ethiopia would be freed of Italy's rule during WWII and become its own country once again. In any case the article states the treaty designed by the British was set forth in 1929. Ethiopia was not part of British Africa, or a protectorate (in regards to what Egypt would become in relation to the UK), so Britain would not care about the Nile in Ethiopia, rather the Nile in Sudan and especially in Egypt. Any country upstream is to not obstruct or deter the natural flow of the Nile-a pivotal source for Egyptian civilization. 90 percent of Egyptians live within 20km of the Nile while a little over 50 percent live within 1km. It is clear Egypt needs the Nile in order to function.

Ethiopia is able to create jobs through the building of the dam and will also be able to employ people through dam maintenance, inspections, etc... for years to come (if the dam is built). The dam will also provide an immense amount of power/energy, truly benefiting the country. The article states Ethiopia just wants to take a more fair share of the Nile. Everybody feels entitled to the Nile. This concept I understand. With that being said I also understand the concept of Egypt being concerned. There country functions though the Nile and its existing. 

I would like to see more of Ethiopia's plans and the statistics they've gathered throughout the duration of this project. I'm sure they have comprised some projected statistics, not just focusing on the positive aspects (for them) but also the negative aspects for Sudan and Egypt. The article states Sudan is on board but Egypt-although taking part in the new agreement thus putting aside the colonial era treaty- is very hesitant when discussing the existence of the dam. Obviously there are fair reasons for the concern...but then again exactly what are the reasons? How would the Nile be affected by the dam and also how would countries downstream (Egypt, Sudan) be affected? 

Its a concern amongst African countries but is it also a concern amongst the world? Will professionals from other countries "put their two cents in?" 

With all this being said, I suppose it does not matter...to Ethiopia. They have already begun the process of building and are about 30% completed. As stated in this bbc article: http://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-26679225 Another interesting factor is how other sub Saharan countries are in favor of the dam. Why? Being in favor means they probably benefit from the dam as well, however this is something that may come to my light at the dam progresses. Until the dams construction is arrested, the dam is certainly being built. Ethiopia is making ground, excuse me energy, to better its country as a whole.  

Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, May 6, 7:22 PM

This article discusses the dispute between Egypt and Ethiopia over the construction of a dam that would provide Ethiopia with a larger share of the Nile's water. Egypt is wholly opposed to this dam because it would mean less water for the country, which so desperately needs it. With 95% of the population of Egypt living within 20km of the Nile River, a reduction in the amount of water supplied to these tens of millions could potentially spell slow disaster. At the same time, however, Ethiopia desperately needs water from the Nile in order to provide sustainable energy for its citizens. 

 

The Nile has been a source of life and energy for thousands of years in an oppressively hot, dry place. The ancient Egyptians counted on the Nile to flood every year so that they would have arable land and used the large river to irrigate their farmland. It is almost ironic, therefore, that Egyptians are once again counting on the water of the Nile to help them survive in such a harsh climate. It seems that the Nile is one of those natural geographic features that is pivotal to political, economic, and social wellbeing. It represents the nexus between natural landforms and the political and economic goals of human beings and nations. Dispute over use of the Nile as a natural and life-giving resource is not the first instance of human debate over possession or use of natural geography and it likely won't be the last. 

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Collecting Rain in Mexico City

Collecting Rain in Mexico City | Lorraine's  Water in the World | Scoop.it
A non-profit in Mexico City suggests using rainwater harvesting to remedy the city's water shortage.
Lorraine Chaffer's insight:

AC: The nature of water scarcity and ways of overcoming it  (ACHGK040)


GeoWorld 7  Chapter 4: The nature of water scarcity and strategies 

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Macquarie Marshes- biodiversity or needs of the farmers- your call?

Macquarie Marshes- biodiversity or needs of the farmers- your call? | Lorraine's  Water in the World | Scoop.it

very good case study and links to other issues investigating the big questions over biodiversity v human demand


Via rednockhums, Sally Egan
Lorraine Chaffer's insight:

AC: The economic, cultural, spiritual and aesthetic value of water for people, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples and peoples of the Asia region (ACHGK041)


GeoWorld 7: Chapter 2: The value of water

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A Hedge against Drought: Why Healthy Soil is ‘Water in the Bank’

A Hedge against Drought: Why Healthy Soil is ‘Water in the Bank’ | Lorraine's  Water in the World | Scoop.it
Lorraine Chaffer's insight:

AC: The nature of water scarcity and ways of overcoming it (ACHGK040)


GeoWorld 7:

Chapter 4. Nature of water scarcity and strategies

Chapter 5: Management strategies: making every drop count

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Indigenous season Calendar

Lorraine Chaffer's insight:

AC: The economic, cultural, spiritual and aesthetic value of water for people, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples and peoples of the Asia region (ACHGK041)


GeoWorld 7: Chapter 2. The value of water

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▶ New Maps:California's Water Shortage

Lorraine Chaffer's insight:

AC:The nature of water scarcity and ways of overcoming it, including studies drawn from Australia and West Asia and/or North Africa (ACHGK040)


Geoworld 7 : Chapter 4. Nature of water scarcity and strategies

       

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A Chart Showing You How Much Water It Takes To Grow All The Food You Eat

A Chart Showing You How Much Water It Takes To Grow All The Food You Eat | Lorraine's  Water in the World | Scoop.it
How much more water does it take to produce an ounce of bread, than a ounce of juice? The answer is not quite what you might expect.
Lorraine Chaffer's insight:

AC: The economic, cultural, spiritual and aesthetic value of water for people, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples and peoples of the Asia region (ACHGK041)


GeoWorld 7: Chapter 2. Value of water  



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China to unveil measures to fight water pollution - Reuters

BEIJING (Reuters) - China is to launch an action plan to protect the quality of its scarce water resources after years of rapid economic growth that have left much of its water supply too polluted for...
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California's Water Crisis | True News

An in-depth look at the real cause of the California water crisis and the history which lead to this challenging situation. Why are farmers trying to grow water intensive crops in a desert...
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Water crisis in the U.S., China, India, and Spain

Water crisis in the U.S., China, India, and Spain | Lorraine's  Water in the World | Scoop.it
Lorraine Chaffer's insight:

AC:

The nature of water scarcity and ways of overcoming it, including studies drawn from Australia and West Asia and/or North Africa (ACHGK040)

The causes, impacts and responses to an atmospheric or hydrological hazard (ACHGK042)


GeoWorld 7: Chapter 4.  Nature of water scarcity and strategies

                       Chapter 6. Hydrological and atmospheric hazards and responses

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Why Isn’t Desalination the Answer to All California’s Water Problems?

Why Isn’t Desalination the Answer to All California’s Water Problems? | Lorraine's  Water in the World | Scoop.it
After four years of nowhere near enough rain, Californians are wondering where else to look for water, and many are talking about the ocean -- desalination. The problem is, it’s really expensive to turn salt water into drinking water.

Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Lorraine Chaffer's insight:

Australian Curriculum

The nature of water scarcity and ways of overcoming it, including studies drawn from Australia and West Asia and/or North Africa (ACHGK040)


Geoworld 7 

Chapter 4.  Nature of water scarcity and strategies

Chapter 5 : Management strategies: making every drop count


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WATCH: The difference between weather & the climate in 3 minutes.

WATCH: The difference between weather & the climate in 3 minutes. | Lorraine's  Water in the World | Scoop.it
The difference between weather & climate can be confusing, but this is a great simple explanation.
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Waiting for the sea

Waiting for the sea | Lorraine's  Water in the World | Scoop.it
It took just 40 years for the Aral Sea to dry up. Fishing ports suddenly found themselves in a desert.
But in one small part of the sea, water is returning.
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