Year 7 Geography Global Issues
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This Video Will Change The Way You Look At Privilege

This Video Will Change The Way You Look At Privilege | Year 7 Geography Global Issues | Scoop.it
What is privilege? Is there any way to describe it?

In a recent video posted by Buzzfeed, several people are asked a series of questions and then told to either step forward or backward if the ques
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India’s forgotten cotton-picking children

India’s forgotten cotton-picking children | Year 7 Geography Global Issues | Scoop.it
Mari Marcel Thekaekara shines a spotlight on the underreported problem of child labour.
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Bridges For Animals - Wildlife Overpasses

Bridges For Animals - Wildlife Overpasses | Year 7 Geography Global Issues | Scoop.it

Our modern society depends on greater connectivity between places.  Regionalized economies, politics and transportation networks are increasingly integrated with far-flung places now more than ever before.  Our biosphere and natural environments are exceptions to this pattern.  Wilderness areas are 'islands' in an ocean of human controlled environments.   We create transportation linkages that unite people economies and cities, but separate herds from there extended habitat. 

 

We've all seen road kill on major highways.  Species like deer, elk, and grizzly bears and other large-bodied animals need a wide range for numerous ecological reasons.  These bridges are an attempt to ameliorate some of the problems that our roads pose for the non-human species that still call Earth home.  From a purely economic standpoint, many argue that these bridges save society money given the accidents and property damage that can be avoided. 

 

Tags: biogeography, transportation, environment, land use, sustainability, environment adapt.


Via Seth Dixon, Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
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Carly Schaus's comment, October 3, 2013 9:48 PM
I think this would be a great idea! it would keep the animals, nature and people safe. They have protection from motor vehicles where they crash on.
Courtney Gritman's comment, October 4, 2013 3:22 PM
I think this would be a wonderful solution from innocent animals from being killed and thousands of car accidents being prevented.
Jerod Garland's comment, October 15, 2013 8:55 PM
This is very interesting! Good scoop!
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Map: These are the cities that climate change will hit first

Map: These are the cities that climate change will hit first | Year 7 Geography Global Issues | Scoop.it

A city hits "climate departure" when the average temperature of its coolest year from then on is projected to be warmer than the average temperature of its hottest year between 1960 and 2005. For example, let's say the climate departure point for D.C. is 2047 (which it is). After 2047, even D.C.'s coldest year will still be hotter than any year from before 2005. Put another way, every single year after 2047 will be hotter than D.C.'s hottest year on record from 1860 to 2005. It's the moment when the old "normal" is really gone.

A big study, just published in the scientific journal Nature, projected that the Earth, overall, passes climate departure in 2047. The study also projects the year of climate departure in dozens of specific cities. Here, from The Post's graphics team, is a map of their findings:


Via Mathijs Booden
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Mathijs Booden's curator insight, October 13, 2013 3:25 AM

The data are from the recent Nature article by Mora et al (http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v502/n7470/full/nature12540.html). 

 

Climate departure would come first in the tropics, because that is where climates typically show little variability, so even a small departure is large in relative terms. However, because tropical ecosystems are adapted to that low variability, they will be hit hard by even a small change in climate. 

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The Geographic Perspective

The Geographic Perspective | Year 7 Geography Global Issues | Scoop.it
Cartoon. What is the geographic perspective?

Via Ashley Reel
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Ashley Reel's curator insight, August 19, 2013 10:12 PM

Everyone has a different understanding of the world. When you think about a place, and see it in your mind's eye, you think of different features, and make different connections than other people would. This image is called a cognitive map. A cognitive map can either be in your brain, or it can be a representation, or drawing, of what you know about a place on paper, or a screen. Some people have much more detailed cognitive maps than others. Senator Al Frankin can draw the entire United States from memory. Can you?


How might an economic geographer differ from an economist? Although space and place are two similar geographical perspectives, how might you define one term from the other?

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What if Americans Only Had as Much Water as Families in Africa?

What if Americans Only Had as Much Water as Families in Africa? | Year 7 Geography Global Issues | Scoop.it
“ The average family in Africa gets by on only five gallons of water a day, according to this thought-provoking PSA video from bewaterwise.com, a project of the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California.”
Via Matthew Wahl
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Follow the Things

"Who makes the things that we buy? Few of us know. They seem untouched by human hands. Occasionally there's a news story, a documentary film, or an artwork showing the hidden ingredients in our coffee, t-shirts, or iPads. They often 'expose' unpleasant working conditions to encourage more 'ethical' consumer or corporate behaviour. followthethings.com is this work's 'online store'. Here you can find out who has followed what, why and how; the techniques used to 'grab' its audiences; the discussions and impacts that this has provoked; and how to follow things yourself."
Via Seth Dixon, Jodi Esaili
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Plan seeks 'chaperones' for threatened species

Plan seeks 'chaperones' for threatened species | Year 7 Geography Global Issues | Scoop.it
Botanical gardens proposed as stopping-off points for plant species as climate warms.
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Being aware of things like a tiny green frog on the label of your chocolate makes a big difference.

Being aware of things like a tiny green frog on the label of your chocolate makes a big difference. | Year 7 Geography Global Issues | Scoop.it
There's a lot going on behind that little green frog you might have seen.
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Earth Hour Australia 2015

Earth Hour Australia 2015 | Year 7 Geography Global Issues | Scoop.it
Earth Hour Australia 2015: Switch off to shine a light on global warming and support Aussie food and farming. #appetiteforchange
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Where Does Your Water Come From?

Where Does Your Water Come From? | Year 7 Geography Global Issues | Scoop.it

This interactive map documents where 443 million people around the world get there water (although the United States data is by far the most extensive).  Most people can't answer this question.  A recent poll by The Nature Conservancy discoverd that 77% of Americans (not on private well water) don't know where their water comes from, they just drink it.  This link has videos, infographics and suggestions to promote cleaner water.  This is also a fabulous example of an embedded map using ArcGIS Online to share geospatial data with a wider audience.  

 

Tags: GIS, water, fluvial, environment, ESRI, pollution, development, consumption, resources, mapping, environment depend, cartography, geospatial. 


Via Seth Dixon, Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
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Nic Hardisty's comment, October 15, 2012 9:01 AM
I was definitely unaware of where my drinking water came from. This is nice, user-friendly map... Hopefully it gets updated regularly, as it will be interesting to see how these sources change over time.
Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, July 1, 2013 3:55 PM

water is a resource we all depend on. Some of my best studies were on local Chesapeake Bay issues.

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Mapping Our Human Footprint

Mapping Our Human Footprint | Year 7 Geography Global Issues | Scoop.it
Students learn about the Human Footprint data set, analyze a map showing where and to what extent humans have influenced Earth, and participate in a class discussion.

Via Ashley Reel
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The great global food gap: Families around the world photographed with weekly shopping as they reveal cost ranges from £3.20 to £320

The great global food gap: Families around the world photographed with weekly shopping as they reveal cost ranges from £3.20 to £320 | Year 7 Geography Global Issues | Scoop.it
Peter Menzel visited 30 families in 24 countries to gather unique snapshots of eating habits around the globe which feature in a new book called The Hungry Planet.
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Dyan deNapoli: The great penguin rescue | Video on TED.com

A personal story, a collective triumph: Dyan deNapoli tells the story of the world's largest volunteer animal rescue, which saved more than 40,000 penguins after an oil spill off the coast of South Africa.
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WWF Finds Southeast Asia’s Hooved Species Are Threatened with Extinction | Press Releases | WWF

SE Asia's hooved animals, like the leaf muntjac, a single large tree leaf can wrap its body, face extinction http://t.co/WFy1gg6VWH
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