Year 7 English: Japanese story telling with cards - Kamishibai
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Year 7 English: Japanese story telling with cards - Kamishibai
Creating literature - Experiment with text structures and language features and their effects in creating literary texts, for example, using rhythm, sound effects, monologue, layout, navigation and colour (ACELT1805)
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English Foundation to Year 10 Curriculum by rows - The Australian Curriculum v8.1

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Home | Asia Education Foundation

Asia Education Foundation website - resources for the study of Asia and Asian life. For school leaders, teachers and students. Specific sites for China, India, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Thailand, Vietnam, Malaysia and the Philippines.
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What Is Kamishibai? - YouTube

A brief introduction to the Japanese narrative art of kamishibai (paper theater).
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Kamishibai in the classroom - YouTube

A guide to how teachers can incorporate kamishibai (Japanese paper plays) into effective pedagogical exercises in their classroom.
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Resources | Asia Education Foundation

English resources that support teaching about Asia
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About Japan: A Teacher’s Resource | Japanese Paper Drama Tradition: Kamishibai | Japan Society

Children learn about the history of kamishibai, a type of Japanese storytelling, and work in small groups to create their own to illustrate and perform for the class.
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Kamishibai for Kids: Homepage

Kamishibai for Kids: Homepage | Year 7 English: Japanese story telling with cards - Kamishibai | Scoop.it

Kamishibai, (kah-mee-she-bye) or “paper-theater,” is said to have started in Japan in the late 1920s, but it is part of a long tradition of picture storytelling, beginning as early as the 9 th or 10 th centuries when priests used illustrated scrolls combined with narration to convey Buddhist doctrine to lay audiences.

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