Year 11 Geography population
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Population pyramids: Powerful predictors of the future

"Population statistics are like crystal balls -- when examined closely, they can help predict a country's future (and give important clues about the past). Kim Preshoff explains how using a visual tool called a population pyramid helps policymakers and social scientists make sense of the statistics, using three different countries' pyramids as examples."


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Nancy Watson's curator insight, September 26, 2014 4:04 PM

Population unit

Lauren Quincy's curator insight, March 20, 2015 1:51 PM

Unit 2: Population and Migration

 

This video was about how demographers categorize data and analyze it. This video showed a few different population pyramids in order to show differences in population in different countries. It showed China as an example and pointed out the remnants of the one child policy 35 years before and how the number of men were higher due to sex selective abortions. They also talked about how the population pyramids could show what stage in the demographic transition model a country was in and how they use them to predict future patterns and changes. 

 

This relates to unit 2 because it covers topics such as population change, demographic transition models, sex composition, population policies and much more. Population pyramids are very useful due to the visualization of sex, age and number composition in a countries population. They are very important in the use of predicting the future change in population because it can tell what the population has gone through in the past and what to expect in the DTM. 

Daniel Lindahl's curator insight, March 21, 2015 10:43 PM

This video illustrates how population pyramids have the ability to show how populations will rise and fall over time. Pyramids specifically show the population based on a specific age, and illustrates a country's amount of young people in comparison to the elderly. 

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The Growth of Megacities

The Growth of Megacities | Year 11 Geography population | Scoop.it

"For the first time in human history, more of the world’s 6.8 billion people live in cities than in rural areas. That is an incredible demographic and geographic shift since 1950 when only 30 percent of the world’s 2.5 billion inhabitants lived in urban environments.

 

The world’s largest cities, particularly in developing countries, are growing at phenomenal rates. As a growing landless class is attracted by urban opportunities, meager as they might be, these cities’ populations are ballooning to incredible numbers.

 

A May 2010 Christian Science Monitor article on “megacities” predicted that by 2050, almost 70 percent of the world’s estimated 10 billion people—more than the number of people living today—will reside in urban areas. The social, economic and environmental problems associated with a predominantly urbanized population are considerably different from those of the mostly rural world population of the past."


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Whitney Souery's curator insight, May 28, 2014 6:48 PM

The majority of megacities are in the developing world, with the exception of places like New York and Tokyo, best showing how the face of the world is changing. Developing countries are on their paths to becoming major powers, such as Calkutta for example. As an enlarging city, more and more citizens are flocking to the abundance of jobs in the city which thus increases India's development as a result of the growing city and thus leads to a cycle of growth as demand for more jobs increases as the city grows. Megacities are thus a symbol of the developing world and can be used in human geography as symbols of development. 

L.Long's curator insight, August 28, 2015 6:08 AM

mega cities

Aidan Lowery's curator insight, March 21, 12:06 PM
unit 7
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Result of Global interaction: Recycling of e-waste in China.

While recycling toxic components is a potential resource, it has also proven to be a pollution hazard.

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oyndrila's curator insight, February 17, 2014 11:14 AM

Shouldn't the countries as well as the companies involved in manufacturing e-products and generating e-wastes take responsibility for the thousands exposed to the toxic components?

Should human health be ignored at the cost of earning profits and generating employment? 

This is definitely an alarming impact of global interaction. Similar situations are visible in India too.

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Population by Latitude and Longitude

Population by Latitude and Longitude | Year 11 Geography population | Scoop.it
Radical Cartography, brought to you by Bill Rankin

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Geoff Findley's curator insight, January 9, 2014 9:37 PM

Cool Cartogram...

 

Keisha Lewis's curator insight, January 12, 2014 8:15 AM

Majorly cool! So many discussions about population distribution can come out of this. :)

Whitney Souery's curator insight, May 28, 2014 6:53 PM

We can see that the majority of the world's population is clustered in the mid latitudes in particularly Asia. Showing population in terms of latitude shows how people live based on environmental factors while longitude remains the same throughout, thus showing countries/continents and their rates of population simply based off of that country's growth rate or demographic momentum aside from just looking at climatic preference. For instance, Asia is the most populated area and this is evident because of the current growth rates. 

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Six questions on China’s one-child policy, answered

Six questions on China’s one-child policy, answered | Year 11 Geography population | Scoop.it
What you need to know about China’s one-child policy and how it is changing.

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oyndrila's curator insight, November 17, 2013 11:43 AM

Consequences and predictions.

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Six questions on China’s one-child policy, answered

Six questions on China’s one-child policy, answered | Year 11 Geography population | Scoop.it
What you need to know about China’s one-child policy and how it is changing.

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oyndrila's curator insight, November 17, 2013 11:43 AM

Consequences and predictions.

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Population Density

Population Density | Year 11 Geography population | Scoop.it

"[This map's] an unabashedly generalized interactive population density map inspired/stolen from a map by William Bunge entitled Islands of Mankind that I came across on John Krygier‘s blog. I thought Bunge’s map was a novel way to look at population density, and I’ve tried to stay close to the spirit of the original."


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Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 12:22 PM

While most articles talk about population growth, this article provides factual and visual evidence to show population density. -UNIT 2

michelle sutherland's curator insight, January 28, 2015 8:28 PM

love the map

Daniel Lindahl's curator insight, March 21, 2015 11:50 PM

This is an interactive map that shows which parts of the world are most densely populated. It becomes very apparent to the viewer that the world is not evenly distributed at all. Places like China and India have a far higher population density than places like Russia. 

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Africa's rising population and youth unemployment challenge - The Guardian

Africa's rising population and youth unemployment challenge - The Guardian | Year 11 Geography population | Scoop.it
The Guardian
Africa's rising population and youth unemployment challenge
The Guardian
The effects of this twofold trend of rapid population growth and rising youth unemployment are especially visible in the late Maathai's own country, Kenya.
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- World Population Day 2013

- World Population Day 2013 | Year 11 Geography population | Scoop.it
Thursday is World Population Day - 2013 focus is on adolescent pregnancy. Follow @UNFPA & #WorldPopDay for updates http://t.co/OxQOphrx6V
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Eye-popping predictions on world population - News & Observer

Eye-popping predictions on world population - News & Observer | Year 11 Geography population | Scoop.it
News & Observer Eye-popping predictions on world population News & Observer The news on the population front sounds bad: Birth rates are not dropping as fast as expected, and we are likely to end up with an even bigger world population by the end...
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Thomas Malthus and Population Growth

Learn more: http://www.khanacademy.org/video?v=r1ywppAJ1xs Thomas Malthus's views on population. Malthusian limits.

 

This is a succinct (but not perfect) summary of Malthusian ideas on population.  What do you think of his ideas?  Any specific parts of his theory that you agree with?  Do you disagree with some of his ideas?  What did history have to say about it?  

 

Tags: Demographics, population, models, APHG,  unit 2 population. 


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Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 17, 2014 7:56 PM

Unit 2

Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 21, 2014 11:27 PM

 

unit 2

MissPatel's curator insight, December 16, 2014 3:24 AM

A little overview of Malthus's theory on population. 

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Nigeria and the Population Bomb - AllAfrica.com

Nigeria and the Population Bomb - AllAfrica.com | Year 11 Geography population | Scoop.it
Nigeria and the Population Bomb
AllAfrica.com
Nigeria's population is growing too fast. The implications are scary. The United Nations, for the umpteenth time, last week raised alarm over what it perceives as population explosion in Nigeria.
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Why caste still matters in India

Why caste still matters in India | Year 11 Geography population | Scoop.it

INDIA’S general election will take place before May. The front-runner to be the next prime minister is Narendra Modi of the Bharatiya Janata Party, currently chief  minister of Gujarat. A former tea-seller, he has previously attacked leaders of the ruling Congress party as elitist, corrupt and out of touch. Now he is emphasising his humble caste origins. In a speech in January he said 'high caste' Congress leaders were scared of taking on a rival from 'a backward caste'. If Mr Modi does win, he would be the first prime minister drawn from the 'other backward classes', or OBC, group. He is not the only politician to see electoral advantage in bringing up the subject: caste still matters enormously to most Indians."


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Lora Tortolani's curator insight, April 8, 2015 9:18 PM

I agree that until there are more jobs created for the people of India, the slower the caste will fade out.  Over time it will fade out eventually, but the creation of jobs and more social interaction will help the process move along faster.  

Chris Costa's curator insight, November 15, 2015 2:51 PM

It was interesting to read about Modi's run for prime minister- I recently read a TIME magazine article about him, his original platform, and his subsequent work in office- and to see so much of Obama's run for office in Modi's struggle. Modi's support among his own caste, traditionally one that has been discriminated against in Indian society, is not at all different from Obama's support among the African American community. It goes to show that, for all our differences, people are a lot more alike then we'd care to think. Beyond that, it was interesting to see how much power the old caste system continues to hold in Indian society, much like the issues with race that Americans continue to struggle with within our own society. Appeals to different castes have been employed successfully by politicians and other forms of media; I once read that the most popular Indian films are often love stories revolving around "forbidden love" between two members of different, opposite castes. In a society that is so rich and complex, with hundreds of different languages and beliefs, it is so easy for lines to be drawn and for differences to be focused upon in a negative light. Happily for India, it has come a long way to address these problems and to move forward. While not perfect, India's future looks bright.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 3:34 PM

i dont understand how a country like india that is mostly modern and on the world scale can still have such an ancient system of labeling people be such a prominent practice in their society, i hope modi gets elected so he can start to eliminate this

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Where the extremely poor live

Where the extremely poor live | Year 11 Geography population | Scoop.it

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dilaycock's curator insight, May 5, 2014 8:52 PM

This information is taken from the World Bank's 2014 report "Prosperity for All." The report looks at "progress to date in reducing global poverty and discusses some of the challenges of reaching the interim target of reducing global poverty to 9 percent by 2020.... . It also reports on the goal of promoting shared prosperity, with a particular focus on describing various characteristics of the bottom 40 percent."

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 12:48 PM

This graphic reveals the poorest populations and where they live and even though India and China are economic competitors on the global stage they still have the poorest communities. 

IN poor communities, the human place is changed by using less structurally sound architecture and disregarding cultural presence for functionality though holding true to cultural presence in individual lives.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 2014 11:49 AM

I agree with this article from the Guardian that development should be measured in human rights gains more than economic advancements.  While globalization is taking place and allowing countries to trade and maximize profits, a large percent of people in the world are deprived basic human rights and are entirely forgotten about and not valued.

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China's urban explosion: 'Sim City' on steroids

China's urban explosion: 'Sim City' on steroids | Year 11 Geography population | Scoop.it
More than half of China's population now lives in cities but the push to urbanize has had mixed results.

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Infant Mortality Rates

Infant Mortality Rates | Year 11 Geography population | Scoop.it
Are All Mothers Created Equal? From the State of the World's Mothers 2012 report see how mothers locations have an impact on the life and death of their children.

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The urbanisation of rural China

The urbanisation of rural China | Year 11 Geography population | Scoop.it
The Chinese government plans to move 250 million people from farms to cities over the next 12 to 15 years.

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Tom Tyndall's curator insight, April 19, 2014 2:48 AM

Internal Migration within China is a feature of their growth.

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The costs and benefits of China's one-child policy

The costs and benefits of China's one-child policy | Year 11 Geography population | Scoop.it
The recent announcement that China’s one-child policy will be partially relaxed will be celebrated worldwide by libertarians, human rights activists and, most importantly, Chinese couples who have longed…...

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In China, one-child policy compounds loss of child for parents

In China, one-child policy compounds loss of child for parents | Year 11 Geography population | Scoop.it
One-child policy leaves some parents childless, hopeless and facing financial ruin in old age.

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jacob benner's comment, September 14, 2013 5:11 PM
China is overpopulated and it its becoming a problem, but by forcing parents to only have one child is leading to other problems. The childless parents describe there life to be empty and full of depression and without their child they are running into financial issues. Most of the time it is to late for the parents to have another child.
Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 15, 2014 5:43 PM

I understand the issues China is having with their large population but the one-child policy hurts the average family. Problems occur when a family can only have one child. If anything were to happen to that child, whether he/she dies young, runs away or gets thrown in prison. That can leave the parents vulnerable later in life. When the parents become elderly they may not have a child to take care of them. China must find another way to control their population. 

Caitlyn Christiansen's curator insight, May 25, 2015 11:04 PM

China's one-child policy has had a greater effect than slowing population growth and decreasing the labor force. Another widespread problem for parents obeying this rule is the loss of their only child and the devastation it brings due to the cultural importance of family in China. Ancestors are greatly respected and descendents mark a great life. After parents retire they rely on their children for support and their needs. When they do not have a child anymore, their whole life derails and they spend the rest of their days with a broken family that can never quite heal. In many cases, the parents are then too old to have another child and their life simply falls apart. Protests have been made in the past for similar situations, but the Chinese government has not yet fulfilled its promises to provide greater assistance to these parents or to change their policy.

 

This article relates to population and migration through the population policy of China and its drastic effects on family life and parents. This policy would be classified as anti-natalist because of its promotion of smaller families with less children. It discourages having children.

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China's Big (and Growing) Problem With its Elderly Population - The Atlantic

China's Big (and Growing) Problem With its Elderly Population - The Atlantic | Year 11 Geography population | Scoop.it
The Atlantic
China's Big (and Growing) Problem With its Elderly Population
The Atlantic
Unsurprisingly, the Elderly Rights Law elicited a caustic reaction from an online population used to Beijing's displays of nanny-statism.
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On World Population Day, Unpacking 9.6 Billion by 2050

On World Population Day, Unpacking 9.6 Billion by 2050 | Year 11 Geography population | Scoop.it
The United Nations predicts the human population will hit 9.6 billion by 2050. How do demographers devise that figure? (On World Population Day, there are 7.2 billion people on Earth.
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China’s Great Uprooting: Moving 250 Million Into Cities

China’s Great Uprooting: Moving 250 Million Into Cities | Year 11 Geography population | Scoop.it
A 12-year plan to move hundreds of millions of rural residents into cities is intended to spur economic growth, but could have unintended consequences, skeptics warn.

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Amanda Donecoff's comment, July 15, 2013 12:39 AM
Test
Amanda Donecoff's comment, July 15, 2013 1:24 AM
The people of China are on a downward slope, even though they are in a process of so much production. Their government has too much power and the people don't have enough say. The urbanization process in place is just another way to stop the people from speaking out or even inquiring about their own opinion. Moving everyone into cities is not going to help China expand or grow as much as they need to as a people in the long run. When you change someone into something they're clearly not, they can never aspire to their true potential. The country of China wants to prosper, but contradicts itself because the government is trying to take away a part of life that has been known to man for as long as anyone could probably remember, which is country; the rural lands that have always run across the Earth. The control and power that China is trying to acquire is not coming easy enough to them because they are too independent. They need to let places like the U.S. help build them and inspire them. Also, their plan for complete city life is not moving fast enough. People are unemployed and financially hurt. Even in 2025, people will continue to hurt and regret the decisions made. Sometimes the government can seem cold and unfeeling because they don't take all of the factors into consideration that they need to so they can thrive. Eventually, people need to come out and make decisions that are risky and outside the box to change the direction that their country is being led into. If China does not stop trying to control their people, and push them all into the city rather than the farming country, it could potentially become a place where people would rather die than be who they are. A great example of this is Foxconn. Many children have committed suicide because of the pressure put on them. Unfortunately, China chose the wrong solution. They didn't actually fix the core of the problem. Putting nets up around the buildings stopped some of the deaths, but it doesn't stop the workers or children from feeling so worthless that they shouldn't exist. China needs to make changes for their morality and for their future as a country with a lot of promise and potential. China and all of its people just need to use their power and ability for the right reasons, in the right ways.
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Population clock for every country

Population clock for every country | Year 11 Geography population | Scoop.it
Real time statistics for current population of any country. Real time data on population, births, deaths, net migration and population growth.

 

This site shows various demographic statistics for every country including some based on projections in demographic trends in the given country.  If the current trends hold (which they won't, but that is still an interesting measure), the entire Japanese population will disappear in 1,000 years according to this Global Post article.


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Kyle Kampe's curator insight, May 27, 2014 10:17 PM

In AP Human Geo., this article relates to the population growth theme because it utilizes all of the indicators we learned in this class, including CBR, CDR, net migration rates, and population growth rates.

Riley Tuggle's curator insight, September 10, 2014 9:51 AM

I believe India has more men than women because sometimes when women can't have a son for their first or second child, the men would beat the women to death, or in some instances women are captured and sold for wives, and they may commit suicide they are so depressed. Also, some pregnant women find out their baby is a girl, they would aport or abandon her because sons are apparently more important and successful because they would stay home and take care of their parents when they are elderly and they would carry on the families name. -rt

MissPatel's curator insight, December 16, 2014 3:22 AM

This is fantastic - have a look at various countries and their 'rate' of growth

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Mapping Population Density

Mapping Population Density | Year 11 Geography population | Scoop.it
I found these cartograms from an article in the Telegraph and was immediately impressed. The cartograms originated here and use data from the Global Rural-Urban Mapping Project as to create the int...

 

This series of cartograms shows some imbalanced populations (such as the pictured Australia) by highlighting countries that have established forward capitals.  Question to ponder: Do forward capitals change the demographic regions of a country significantly enough to justify moving the capital? 


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Joe Andrade's curator insight, August 5, 2013 10:21 PM

Interseting way to visualy map population density.

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 2014 7:28 PM

It's a creative and vial way to map population density. 

MissPatel's curator insight, December 16, 2014 3:24 AM

This is from 'worldmapper' - it is a great sight to help you understand using technology the most densely populated areas of various countries. What do you think they are?