Year 11 Geography
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Rescooped by Fleur Farah from Geography Education
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City Centers Are Doing Better than Inner Suburbs

City Centers Are Doing Better than Inner Suburbs | Year 11 Geography | Scoop.it

A new report tracks demographic trends across 66 U.S. metro areas.  The report provides comprehensive evidence for Aaron Renn's "new donut" model of cities (pictured in above image, on the right). Renn's model proposes that city centers and outer-ring suburbs are doing well economically, but inner-ring suburbs are struggling with a new influx of poverty."

 

Tags: urban, economic, urban models, APHG.


Via Seth Dixon
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Michael Amberg's curator insight, May 26, 2015 11:09 PM

This shows the changes in urban geography and how the world is changing due to all the new technology available now.

Bella Reagan's curator insight, May 26, 2015 11:33 PM

Urban unit

Summary

This article goes in to depth on a newer model on cites called the donut model, as pictured similar to a donut. The donut model was created by Aaron Renn, and it shows urban development recently in cities. The center of the city is grownign economically and falling. There is an influx of people moving in , resulting in an increase of poverty too. Also more educated people are moving in like young newly educated individuals.

insight

The new structure of cities forming is a change from the old. With cities now developing bigger and more industrial, there are many opportunities for people for work in the center of the cit. however, many people may want the jobs but can't get them, so many of those in poverty live in the city centers in search of economic opportunities. It is also interesting to see the status of the people changing the in the city center with that also more young educated people move to city centers, most likely in search of job opportunities. This new way of urban development is modernizing the work system.

Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 2015 8:44 AM

More and more the urban stage is filling and cities are becoming once again the next big thing. After WW2 suburbs became intensively popular but now since a change in personnel views people prefer the city more.

Rescooped by Fleur Farah from Lorraine's Geography SKILLS and ICT
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Earth from space: 15 amazing things in 15 years

Earth from space: 15 amazing things in 15 years | Year 11 Geography | Scoop.it
“To celebrate 15 successful years of NASA's Earth Observing System, enjoy 15 impressive images gathered by the Terra, Aqua and Aura satellites.”
Via Lorraine Chaffer
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The Hoover Dam of solar is now live in the desert of California. Here's why it's so important | GigaOM Clean Tech

The Hoover Dam of solar is now live in the desert of California. Here's why it's so important | GigaOM Clean Tech | Year 11 Geography | Scoop.it
Less than a hundred miles from the rim of the Hoover Dam, just outside of Las Vegas at the edge of dusty San Bernardino County, sits a symbol of how the sun will some day provide copious amounts of electricity for entire cities. This is Ivanpah, the world’s largest operating solar farm, which uses 347,000 mirrors (173,500 heliostats) and three huge 450-foot towers to harness the sun’s heat to generate electricity.As of the beginning of this year, it’s a mere symbol no longer. After more than seven years of development, over three years of construction, 2,700 workers, and $1.6 billion in U.S. government loan money, the massive solar farm is finally live and sending enough solar power into the grid to power 140,000 (average American) homes. Ivanpah was officially launched on Thursday with an event that featured U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernie Moniz, David Crane, the CEO of Ivanpah’s majority owner power company NRG Energy, and members of the band The Fray, which filmed a video at Ivanpah and titled their latest album Helios. Oh, and of course, a lot of media people, too.To the workers, the companies (including Google and startup BrightSource) and the federal and state groups involved in supporting the 5-mile by one-mile long colossal clean power project, Ivanpah is the Hoover Dam for this generation. In fact, Bechtel, which helped build the Hoover Dam in the 1930s, also led the construction of Ivanpah.More than anything, the facility marks a future of emerging clean power options that can begin to compete with large scale fossil fuel power, but without the associated carbon emissions. Ivanpah is an early example of how next-generation technology, innovation, entrepreneurialism and government support can come together to provide solutions to climate change in a substantial way.Click headline to read more--
Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Rescooped by Fleur Farah from The Three Gorges Dam APES
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World's Largest Dam

World's Largest Dam | Year 11 Geography | Scoop.it
The Three Gorges Dam is a controversial project. About 1.3 milllion people were relocated, about 100 towns were submerged underwater because of the altering of the river flow, and various species are threatened, such as the Yangtze dolphin, Chinese sturgeon, and the finless porpoise
Via Faith Elshire
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Topography

Topography | Year 11 Geography | Scoop.it
How the landscape has changed from 1987 to 2006 as an effect of the Three Gorges Dam.
Via Faith Elshire
Fleur Farah's insight:
Three Gorges Dam
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North America's big freeze seen from space

North America's big freeze seen from space | Year 11 Geography | Scoop.it
“ Satellite images have captured the progress of the big freeze that has gripped the United States and Canada, plunging many states into unfamiliar freezing temperatures. (Oh that #polarvortex!”
Fleur Farah's insight:
Atmosphere
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Plate Tectonics Map - Plate Boundary Map - GEOLOGY.COM

Plate Tectonics Map - Plate Boundary Map - GEOLOGY.COM | Year 11 Geography | Scoop.it
“ Plate Tectonics Map and Satellite Views of Plate Boundaries - Geology.com - maps provided by Google.com...”
Via Natalie Sing
Fleur Farah's insight:
Lithosphere
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Rescooped by Fleur Farah from Lorraine's Geography SKILLS and ICT
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Interactive Wind Map

Interactive Wind Map | Year 11 Geography | Scoop.it
Mesmerizing.

Via Seth Dixon, Lorraine Chaffer
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Tracey M Benson's curator insight, March 13, 2014 4:30 PM

Stunning interactive wind map.

Richard Thomas's curator insight, March 13, 2014 5:23 PM

Excellent for visual learners.

K_Lynam's curator insight, March 20, 2014 4:43 PM

The Ides of March definitely BLEW into our area!  Perfect timing to find @Seth Dixon's Scoop of this interactive Wind Map!

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Imagining Continental Drift

"This animated documentary tells the story of polar explorer Alfred Wegener, the unlikely scientist behind continental drift theory."


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 18, 2015 9:04 PM

While plate tectonics is now universally accepted, when Alfred Wegener first proposed continental drift it was it was greeted with a great deal of skepticism from the academic community.  This video nicely shows how scientific advancement requires exploration and imagination, and whole lot of heart.   


Tagstectonicsphysicalgeomorphology, K12STEM, video.

Bharat Employment's curator insight, February 20, 2015 12:47 AM

http://www.bharatemployment.com/

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Climate change: how hot will it get in my lifetime? - interactive

Climate change: how hot will it get in my lifetime? - interactive | Year 11 Geography | Scoop.it
The UN is to publish the most exhaustive examination of climate change science to date, predicting dangerous temperature rises. How hot will it get in your lifetime?

Via Mathijs Booden, Lorraine Chaffer
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How Did the Hoover Dam Affect Wildlife?

How Did the Hoover Dam Affect Wildlife? | Year 11 Geography | Scoop.it
“ How Did the Hoover Dam Affect Wildlife?. The Hoover Dam ecosystem, a part of the Mojave Desert, is home to a number of animal species, including the bighorn sheep, coyote, ground squirrel, ringtail cat and the endangered desert tortoise. ” This article talks about the plants and animals that live near the hoover dam in Colorado. This article says how they are effected and how it has changed the lives of the animals. It specifically talks about the desert tortoise that has suffered the most. This tortoise's nesting grounds and nests have been greatly disrupted by the hoover dam. There are many other animals that have been effected as well.
Via Tiffany Yeh
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China - Three Gorges Dam - Impact - New York Times

China - Three Gorges Dam - Impact - New York Times | Year 11 Geography | Scoop.it
“ A year after the completion of the Three Gorges Dam, water pollution, landslides and mass resettlement have led to questions about hydropower as a solution to China’s energy conundrum. ” The Three Gorges Dam has broken three records during its construction. Although, it has caused many environmental problems since its construction the government has high hopes that, that it soon will be the world's biggest man-made producer of electricity from renewable energy. One of the major problems with this dam is that that, although it will create clean energy it has displaced millions of people from their homes around the area. Many people are now homeless and are angry at the government. The government promised to find a compromise, but the future looks grim for many of the displaced people.
Via Jenna Wiegand
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Stunning Map Reveals World's Earthquakes Since 1898

Stunning Map Reveals World's Earthquakes Since 1898 | Year 11 Geography | Scoop.it
If you've ever wondered where — and why — earthquakes happen the most, look no further than a new map, which plots more than a century's worth of nearly every recorded earthquake strong enough to at least rattle the bookshelves. The map shows earthquakes of magnitude 4.0 or greater since 1898; each is marked in a lightning-bug hue that glows brighter with increasing magnitude. The overall effect is both beautiful and arresting, revealing the silhouettes of Earth's tectonic boundaries in stark, luminous swarms of color. The map's maker, John Nelson, the user experience and mapping manager for IDV Solutions, a data visualization company, said the project offered several surprises. "First, I was surprised by the sheer amount of earthquakes that have been recorded," Nelson told OurAmazingPlanet. "It's almost like you could walk from Seattle to Wellington [New Zealand] if these things were floating in the ocean, and I wouldn't have expected that." In all, 203,186 earthquakes are marked on the map, which is current through 2003. And it reveals the story of plate tectonics itself. The long volcanic seams where Earth's crust is born appear as faint, snaking lines cutting through the world's oceans. The earthquakes along these so-called spreading centers tend to be rather mild. The best studied spreading center, called the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, bisects the Atlantic Ocean, on the right side of the image. Its Pacific counterpart wanders along the eastern edge of the Pacific Ocean, cutting a wide swath offshore of South America. Another spreading center makes a jog though the Indian Ocean and up through the Red Sea. But one glance at the map shows that the real earthquake action is elsewhere. Subduction zones, the places where tectonic plates overlap and one is forced to dive deep beneath the other and into the Earth's crushing interior — a process that generates the biggest earthquakes on the planet — stand out like a Vegas light show. Nelson said this concept hit home particularly for the Ring of Fire, the vast line of subduction zones around the northern and western edge of the Pacific Ocean. "I have a general sense of where it is, and a notion of plate tectonics, but when I first pulled the data in and started painting it in geographically, it was magnificent," Nelson said. "I was awestruck at how rigid those bands of earthquake activity really are."
Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, Ricardo Reyes
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Ring of Fire

Ring of Fire | Year 11 Geography | Scoop.it
Imagine living in the part of the world known as the 'Ring of Fire'. In this clip you will discover where the Ring of Fire is and how it affects the millions of people who live there. View animations to understand what is happening deep below the Earth's surface. See the damage and destruction caused by a tsunami in Samoa.
Via Asia Education Foundation
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Explore Every Tornado Across the United States Since 1980 Through This Interactive Map

Explore Every Tornado Across the United States Since 1980 Through This Interactive Map | Year 11 Geography | Scoop.it
See why they call it Tornado Alley, but don't be fooled into thinking a tornado can't happen in your own backyard
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Rescooped by Fleur Farah from Geography Education
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Seeing Equinoxes and Solstices from Space

From the Smithsonian Magazine: "
Today, March 20, is the vernal equinox, the official start of spring. (Or, in the southern hemisphere, autumn. Sorry.) We celebrate two main sets of holidays pegged to the orientation of the Earth vis-à-vis the Sun—the “equinoxes” and the “solstices.” A few years ago the team at NASA's Earth Observatory used observations from a EUMETSAT meteorological satellite to make the video above, which shows what the solstices and equinoxes look like from space.On the equinoxes, like the spring equinox today or the fall equinox in September, the length of the day and night are as close as they'll get. The northern hemisphere's summer solstice, in June, is the day with the most hours of sunlight. The winter solstice, in December, has the least daylight. All of it has to do with the fact that the Earth's rotation axis is tilted 23.5 degrees relative to the orbit we take as we circle the Sun.For those inclined towards exploring Earth-Sun interactions, playing around with the University of Nebraska-Lincoln's Sun Simulator is a fun way to make a little more sense of the various factors that control how the Sun appears in the sky.

Via Seth Dixon
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