Year 11 Geography
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How equal do we want the world to be? You'd be surprised

How equal do we want the world to be? You'd be surprised | Year 11 Geography | Scoop.it
The news of society's growing inequality makes all of us uneasy. But why? Dan Ariely reveals some new, surprising research on what we think is fair, as far as how wealth is distributed over societies ... then shows how it stacks up to the real stats.
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Renewable energy: NSW to be 'Australia's answer to California'

Renewable energy: NSW to be 'Australia's answer to California' | Year 11 Geography | Scoop.it
Baird government plans to adorn its buildings with solar panels and ease the way for more wind farms.
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Stopping the chainsaws

Stopping the chainsaws | Year 11 Geography | Scoop.it
Determined Australian forester Scott Poynton is employing unusual methods in his crusade to get the world's loggers to clean up their act.
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What the loss of Crimea really means for Ukraine

What the loss of Crimea really means for Ukraine | Year 11 Geography | Scoop.it

"In symbolic terms, it's a huge loss. The Crimean Peninsula holds an important place in the region's history, and the inability to prevent the region from joining Russia is a serious test of leadership for the new Ukrainian government in Kiev.

In practical terms, however, what Crimea means for Ukraine is less clear. In an article last week, The Post's Will Englund noted that Crimea may end up costing Russia more than it might like. And what does Ukraine really lose?"


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 24, 2014 12:35 PM

We often view global affairs through our own little prism, considering how it affects us.  So much of the discussion has revolved around Russia and the West in general (and the U.S. specifically), that Ukraine almost gets lost in the shuffle.  All this amid news that the acting Ukrainian Foreign Minister has said that the possibility of war "is growing."

Tag: Ukraine, political, conflict, devolution.

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Will Ethiopian dam dry up the Nile?

Will Ethiopian dam dry up the Nile? | Year 11 Geography | Scoop.it

"Construction of the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (known as Gerd) is now about 30% complete.  Once completed, in three years, it will be Africa's largest hydropower dam, standing some 170m (558ft) tall."


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Albert Jordan's curator insight, April 1, 2014 3:06 PM

In an area fraught with political instability, non state actors, and rebel groups all too willing to fight for power and the wealth that comes from it - it will be interesting to see how the conflicts shift over time as this dam gets closer to completion. Will Egypt attempt to sabotage it or will they take a more diplomatic approach and try to work with the Ethiopian government diplomatically again?  Perhaps Egypt will whisper in to the ear of Sudan or the various "rebel" groups in the region, considering diplomatic means have apparently failed so far. With Sudan's use of the Blue River also going to be affected by Ethiopia's damming, it will be interesting to see if a cooperation between Egypt and Sudan occurs. Perhaps Ethiopia would like to see a deeper conflict between Sudan and South Sudan, keeping their affected neighbor off balance.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, April 16, 2014 6:47 PM

It is extremely difficult to divide a river. The Ethiopians will benefit immensely from this project but the Egyptians could lose everything if the Nile dries up. This is going to be a difficult problem to solve.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 3:45 PM

There is no way the whole Nile river is going to be dried up because of this damn. Ethiopia won't let that happen. To say that the river is going to have the same amount of water in it, thats not going to happen. Obviously the Gerd is going to have a huge impact on the water supply of the Nile but it definitely isn't going to dry up the whole thing!

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Eco-Friendly Architectural Projects Raising Awareness of Earth's Biomes - Industry Tap

The largest natural biome in the world is the maroon colored Taiga, a Russian word for forest, covering large parts of Canada, Europe and Asia with coniferous forests.
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The Global Population in 2100

The Global Population in 2100 | Year 11 Geography | Scoop.it
Solving many of the world’s biggest environmental challenges may have just gotten more difficult.

The Department of Economic and Social Affairs of the UN recently released population data indicating the midline estimate - more than 10.8 billion by 2100 - is 800 million higher than the 2010 prediction.

Today’s rural-to-urban migration will continue in full force, with upwards of 84% of the planet living in cities at the close of the century (compared to 52 % today).

Of course population isn’t the only factor contributing to humans’ planetary impact. Consumption may be equally important when looking at the drivers of environmental change across the Earth. Nevertheless, population will continue to be a major consideration as we work to address issues ranging from energy and food security to water availability, species loss, pollution, urban planning and more in the decades ahead...


Via Lauren Moss, Lorraine Chaffer
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Aleasha Reed's curator insight, September 27, 2013 9:14 AM

By the year 2100 our global population is calculated to reach 10.8 billion. The United States is expected to grow another 150 million by this time. Our population right now is 313.9 million right now. Our big cities will continue to grow, and new ones will arise as the years pass.

M-Christine Lanne's curator insight, November 11, 2013 2:44 AM

La démographie, une donnée déterminante  pour l'évolution du climat et la pression sur les ressources naturelles. Nous finissons hélas par être trop nombreux sur terre pour ce qu'elle peut supporter au rythme actuel...

MissPatel's curator insight, December 17, 2014 2:09 AM

A future to look forward to? Your potential future? Good, bad or ugly? 

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Hunger Map

Hunger Map | Year 11 Geography | Scoop.it
From Africa and Asia to Latin America and the Near East, there are 870 million people in the world who do not get enough food to lead a healthy, productive life.

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Parts of Britain are battered by gale force winds and storms - Telegraph

Parts of Britain are battered by gale force winds and storms - Telegraph | Year 11 Geography | Scoop.it
Parts of Scotland, England and Northern Ireland are battered by gale force winter winds and storms.
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PopulationPyramid.net

PopulationPyramid.net | Year 11 Geography | Scoop.it
Population Pyramids of the Whole World from 1950 to 2100 — PopulationPyramid.net

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FTChronicles Intro Video…

FTChronicles Intro Video… | Year 11 Geography | Scoop.it
Join us January 2nd-14th on a journey across Central America to hear directly from the coffee farmers how fair trade is affecting their lives… Web-series and Journals: FairTradeChronicles.com...

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Bill Palladino - MLUI's curator insight, January 2, 2013 12:31 PM

These are our good friends from Higher Grounds Trading here in TC. Take a look at this kickoff and subsribe to the web series.

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Is Fracking for Enhanced Geothermal Systems the Same as Fracking for Natural Gas? | Alternative Energy Stocks

Is Fracking for Enhanced Geothermal Systems the Same as Fracking for Natural Gas? | Alternative Energy Stocks | Year 11 Geography | Scoop.it

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The states people really want to move to — and those they don’t

The states people really want to move to — and those they don’t | Year 11 Geography | Scoop.it
A national trend has reversed.

 

When the U.S. economy slowed during the recession, so did one of the major demographic shifts of the last several decades. For a brief respite, the Northeast and Midwest stopped shedding quite so many residents to the burgeoning Sun Belt. That trend, though — which has big consequences for politics, among other things — has been picking back up.  New census data shows the trend accelerating back to its pre-recession pace.

 

Tags: migration, economic, USA.


Via Seth Dixon
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Exploring the roof of the world: Sites2See. NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre

Exploring the roof of the world: Sites2See. NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre | Year 11 Geography | Scoop.it
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Geopolitics and the New World Order

Geopolitics and the New World Order | Year 11 Geography | Scoop.it
Geography increasingly fuels endless chaos and old-school conflicts in the 21st Century.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 20, 2014 1:22 PM

I know that many academic geographers weren't pleased with the environmental determinism in Robert Kaplan's book The Revenge of Geography and the attention that in received in mainstream media outlets like the New York Times (mainly for it's reduction of geography to physical geography and it's acceptance of maps as pure truth).   In this article in TIME by Robert Kaplan, he highlights how geographic context is vital to understanding global politics...that is something we all can agree on even if we don't like the particulars of his analysis. 

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, March 30, 2014 8:12 PM

Como Diz Milton Santos: "O retorno do território"! Que, aliás, nunca deixou de estar no centro dos acontecimentos ... 

 O insight de Seth Dixon:

Sei que muitos geógrafos acadêmicos não ficaram satisfeitos com o determinismo ambiental no livro de Robert Kaplan A Vingança de Geografia e a atenção que em recebido em meios de comunicação tradicionais, como o New York Times (principalmente por sua redução de geografia para geografia física e é a aceitação de mapas verdade tão pura). Neste artigo em TEMPO por Robert Kaplan , ele destaca como contexto geográfico é vital para compreender a política global ... que é algo que todos podemos concordar, mesmo que nós não gostamos de os elementos de sua análise. 

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Human Development Index variation

Human Development Index variation | Year 11 Geography | Scoop.it

"Here's how the United States looks when it is measured on the county level by the same standards used to rank countries by the UN, the Human Development Index.  Five variables are taken into account: life expectancy, income per capita, school enrollment, percentage of high school graduates, and percentage of college graduates." 


Via Seth Dixon
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steve smith's curator insight, March 26, 2014 3:53 PM

A fantastic resource for development studies.

Ms. Harrington's curator insight, March 26, 2014 6:57 PM

Regional patterns?

Brian Altonen's curator insight, March 26, 2014 9:18 PM

A WHO map of what life in the U.S. is like demonstrates the role of urbanization and heavily population regions for defining where U.N.'s Human Development Index scores are highest.

Three of the metrics pertain primarily to education.  The fourth is a measure of financial success for a region.  The fifth is most likely a consequence of scoring well for these first four measures.

An obvious next step in making additional use of this map is to compare its findings with the distributions of various language, culture and ethnic groups in this country, according to most recent US Census patterns.  

 

 

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Great Circle Mapper

Great Circle Mapper | Year 11 Geography | Scoop.it

"The Great Circle Mapper displays maps and computes distances along a geodesic path. It includes an extensive, searchable database of airports and other locations."


Via Seth Dixon
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YEC Geo's curator insight, January 15, 2014 8:31 AM

Cool tool.

matthias brendler's curator insight, January 16, 2014 10:34 AM

Maps Monster am I!

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, January 28, 2014 12:59 PM

Because this route from JFK Airport to SYD AUS Airport is not a straight route there are many factors that need to be taken in account because of the overwhelming idea of trade winds and how that affects flight plans and routing for different airways/airlanes.  The plane has to fight against the trafe winds in order to create a specific ETA for the passenger and the flight crue among the plane. This is all dependent upon the trade winds (prevailing and other kinds) transmitting against the plane.

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Maldives

Maldives | Year 11 Geography | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
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Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 8:54 PM

The creation of the Maldives was a evolutionary process that was created with hotspots in the Pacific Ocean. However most of the 1200 or so islands are disappearing. As many of these islands have been created and built upon, the soils are losing their strength. Now we have a process of erosion not only from rain but also from the sea waves. As this eats away at the islands they are getting smaller and smaller and unless they start bringing in artificial land area they will someday disappear.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 10:39 PM

The Maldives Islands were created by Hotspots in the Pacific Ocean. Many of the one thousand islands that are there are slowly disappearing. The islands are being destroyed by rain and from sea waves that crash onto the island itself. Soon the land, just like Kiribati will disappear because they just keep shrinking in size more and more. Their economy revolves mostly around tourist money and parts of the islands have been highly developed for high end tourist marketing.  

Nicholas A. Whitmore's curator insight, December 19, 2015 4:33 AM

Honestly a nation like the Maldives would only be possible with today's technology. the lack of resources, land and linking landmass would have made it stuck in an era with villages at best. The modern country if you ask me is also a disaster waiting to happen. Their cities are right on sea level. A single tsunami or storm would devastate them never mind rising sea levels. I just think they are acting unsustainable and their growth without lack of native resources will lead to their nations ultimate failure. While I wish these people success their islands are also eroding due to reefs so geography is pretty much against them at every turn. In the future hopefully a solution to these problems can be found but until then this will likely be an area that will have to be evacuated in the future like many others.

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Mexico takes steps to protect monarch habitats threatened by illegal logging | Mexico Current News and Mexico Current Events, all the Latest News on Mexico Today

Mexico takes steps to protect monarch habitats threatened by illegal logging | Mexico Current News and Mexico Current Events, all the Latest News on Mexico Today | Year 11 Geography | Scoop.it
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Fertility Rates in Gapminder

Fertility Rates in Gapminder | Year 11 Geography | Scoop.it

"CATHOLIC Argentina, Mexico & Phillippines have more babies born per woman than MUSLIM Indonesia, Iran & Turkey."


Via Seth Dixon, geographynerd, Sharon McLean
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Mathijs Booden's comment, September 28, 2013 3:03 PM
Any mention of Gapminder gets an upvote from me. One of the best resources in and outside of the classroom, period.
jon inge's curator insight, October 11, 2013 5:20 PM

awesome site for development economics

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 2, 2014 6:15 PM

When watching the video it was apparetnt that for Iran during the 1950-early1970's there was an increase in fertility and then decreased to almost 1.32% in 2010. These facts were very interseting to see and the way that we as historians/ georgraphers can predict the future with the past facts.

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Fair Trade USA, Rainforest Alliance coffee certification soars

NEW YORK (Reuters) - Coffee beans from farms certified as environmentally and socially responsible by Fair Trade USA and Rainforest Alliance reached a record high in 2012.Production of Rainforest Alliance...

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Alternative thinking – Renewable energy under the microscope

Alternative thinking – Renewable energy under the microscope | Year 11 Geography | Scoop.it

Noted economist and author Jeremy Rifkin says we are entering a Third Industrial Revolution, characterised, like the two industrial revolutions that preceded it, by the effective convergence of breakthrough energy and communications technologies of the day.


Via jean lievens, Sharon McLean
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