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WATCH: In 50 Years, There May Be No Fish Left To Catch

WATCH: In 50 Years, There May Be No Fish Left To Catch | Lorraine's Environmental Change &  Management | Scoop.it
A powerful video about how overfishing is decimating our oceans reminds us this week to pause and think twice about the seafood we eat.

Via Kathy Dowsett
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Marine environments and management option topic

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Lorraine's Environmental Change &  Management
Resources  linked to the Australian Curriculum Geography
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Rescooped by Lorraine Chaffer from The amazing world of Geography
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California Drought - consequence of endless growth!

California Drought - consequence of endless growth! | Lorraine's Environmental Change &  Management | Scoop.it
A punishing drought is forcing a reconsideration of whether the aspiration of untrammeled growth that has for so long been the state’s engine has run against the limits of nature.

Via oyndrila
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oyndrila's curator insight, April 5, 1:03 PM

Rapidly urbanising cities should learn from this example and try to develop on the lines of sustainability. And, encourage a circular system rather than a linear one.

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A Dutch city makes room for its river

A Dutch city makes room for its river | Lorraine's Environmental Change &  Management | Scoop.it
Nijmegen is turning a flood-control project on the River Waal into an opportunity to redevelop its inner core.
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Option : Inland water. New approaches to flooding respect environmental processes 

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Rescooped by Lorraine Chaffer from Unit 3 Biodiversity under threat - Arctic - June 2015
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Protecting Our Shared Arctic

Protecting Our Shared Arctic | Lorraine's Environmental Change &  Management | Scoop.it
Niila Inga, a Sami leader in that part of Sweden that is above the Arctic Circle, has this to say about the impact of climate change on the future of his reindeer herding society: “If this climate change keeps going at this rate, I’m pretty sure...

Via Chris Childs
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Europe is rapidly losing its biodiversity and wildlife habitats

Europe is rapidly losing its biodiversity and wildlife habitats | Lorraine's Environmental Change &  Management | Scoop.it
Birds, insects and fish are struggling under pressure from urban sprawl, habitat loss and pollution, warns a major EU report
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Organic farming 'benefits biodiversity' - BBC News

Organic farming 'benefits biodiversity' - BBC News | Lorraine's Environmental Change &  Management | Scoop.it
Organic farms act as a refuge for wild plants, offsetting the loss of biodiversity on conventional farms, a study suggests.
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Humans have changed the planet. Here's how we design for that now

Humans have changed the planet. Here's how we design for that now | Lorraine's Environmental Change &  Management | Scoop.it
Human beings have made enormous changes to Earth, reshaping it, developing it and generally altering it so much that in many cases its pre-human condition has become unrecognizable. In this far-ran...
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Photographer Documents the Rapid Development of Chongqing, a 21st Century Megacity - Feature Shoot

Photographer Documents the Rapid Development of Chongqing, a 21st Century Megacity - Feature Shoot | Lorraine's Environmental Change &  Management | Scoop.it
If you’re measuring by sheer space, Chongqing is the largest city in China. Over the last few decades, it has grown so large that in 1997 its status was changed from that of a city in Sichuan province to a direct-controlled municipality; it was essentially made its own mini-province. In the latest project from Tim Franco, Metamorpolis, the Shanghai-based photographer seeks to document the 21st century mega-city, in all its gritty magnitude.
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Concrete Consequences - Rhode Island Monthly - February 2014 - Rhode Island

Concrete Consequences - Rhode Island Monthly - February 2014 - Rhode Island | Lorraine's Environmental Change &  Management | Scoop.it
The more we slap concrete down all over the state, the more we trigger devestating consequences, like the million-dollar flooding in Cranston last September.
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Environmental change - non porous surfaces increase runoff

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Smuggled animals | Reuters.com

Smuggled animals | Reuters.com | Lorraine's Environmental Change &  Management | Scoop.it

Biodiversity loss

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Biodiversity loss has environmental consequences 

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Rescooped by Lorraine Chaffer from All about water, the oceans, environmental issues
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Jurassic fish reproducing once more in Missouri rivers

Jurassic fish reproducing once more in Missouri rivers | Lorraine's Environmental Change &  Management | Scoop.it
For the first time in 30 years, the Missouri Department of Conservation has confirmed evidence that the state-endangered lake sturgeon is reproducing in

Via Kathy Dowsett
Lorraine Chaffer's insight:

Option topic: inland water and management - a success story 

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Rescooped by Lorraine Chaffer from Amazing Science
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Horribly bleak study sees ‘empty landscape’ as large herbivores vanish at startling rate

Horribly bleak study sees ‘empty landscape’ as large herbivores vanish at startling rate | Lorraine's Environmental Change &  Management | Scoop.it

They never ate anybody — but now, some of planet Earth’s innocent vegetarians face end times. Large herbivores — elephants, hippos, rhinos and gorillas among them — are vanishing from the globe at a startling rate, with some 60 percent threatened with extinction, a team of scientists reports. The situation is so dire, according to a new study, that it threatens an “empty landscape” in some ecosystems “across much of the planet Earth.” The authors were clear: This is a big problem — and it’s a problem with us, not them.


“Growing human populations, unsustainable hunting, high densities of livestock, and habitat loss have devastating consequences for large, long-lived, slow-breeding, and, therefore, vulnerable herbivore species,” reads “Collapse of the world’s largest herbivores” in Science Advances, a publication of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.


As if humanity’s bottomless appetite for land and meat weren’t enough, organized crime and the endless hunt for body parts from elephants and rhinos is also a major factor in Africa and southern Asia, the study said. Between 2002 and 2011 alone, the number of forest elephants in central Africa declined by 62 percent. Some 100,000 African elephants were poached between 2010 and 2012. And the western black rhinoceros in Africa was declared extinct in 2011.


“This slaughter is driven by the high retail price of rhinoceros horn, which exceeds, per unit weight, that of gold, diamonds, or cocaine,” according to the study. This slaughter and its consequences are not modest, the article said. In fact, the rate of decline is such that “ever-larger swaths of the world will soon lack many of the vital ecological services these animals provide, resulting in enormous ecological and social costs.”


Herbivores, it turns out, don’t just idle about munching on various green things. They play a vital role as “ecosystem engineers,” the paper said — expanding grasslands for plant species, dispersing seeds in manure, and, in the ultimate sacrifice, providing food for predators.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Diane Johnson's curator insight, May 6, 7:35 AM

Connections to ESS human impact

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How Kelp May Help Save Our Seas

How Kelp May Help Save Our Seas | Lorraine's Environmental Change &  Management | Scoop.it

OPtion tpic The thick, slimy brown ribbons are notorious for tangling the ankles of beachgoers and rotting in pungent piles. But kelp, according to its growing fan base, could also prove potent in protecting the health of oceans -- and us.

"We've got so...

Lorraine Chaffer's insight:

Option topic: Marine environments & management

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Aboriginal groups impose dugong hunting ban

Aboriginal groups impose dugong hunting ban | Lorraine's Environmental Change &  Management | Scoop.it
In the wake of seagrass damage from the 2011 floods, traditional owners have decided to stop hunting dugong.
Lorraine Chaffer's insight:


Australian curriculum

The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples’ approaches to custodial responsibility and environmental management in different regions of Australia (ACHGK072)


Geoworld 10

Chapter 2 Human INdiced Envirobmental change and management

2.10 - 2.14 Indigenous world views and management 

Chapter 4 Coastal management (4.4)

Chapter 6 Indigenous land management (6.10)

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'Nightmare' California oil spill damages rare coastal ecosystem

'Nightmare' California oil spill damages rare coastal ecosystem | Lorraine's Environmental Change &  Management | Scoop.it
Activists say accident is soiling Gaviota coast, a Mediterranean-climate region of which there are only five in the world, and will be closed off for weeks or months
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Shellfish species shrinking as rising carbon emissions hit marine life

Shellfish species shrinking as rising carbon emissions hit marine life | Lorraine's Environmental Change &  Management | Scoop.it
Biologists warn that hundreds of species could die or weaken as growing levels of CO2 make oceans more acidic and disrupt shell formation
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Using fire as a land management tool - Talgarno

Using fire as a land management tool - Talgarno | Lorraine's Environmental Change &  Management | Scoop.it
EVENT Using fire as a land management tool informed by traditional Indigenous and contemporary fire knowledge - Talgarno WHEN ...
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Biodiversity PR Project

In this video biodiversity is explained. The threats to it are also shown and what can be done to help protect and restore biodiversity.
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River Revision

River Revision | Lorraine's Environmental Change &  Management | Scoop.it
See if you can define the following terms -
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An excellent example of using Sway to create stimulating classroom resources ( in this case on rivers / inland water in AC) by Clare Kinnane in NSW

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Rescooped by Lorraine Chaffer from DSODE HSC Geography
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What's Happening to Biodiversity?

What's Happening to Biodiversity? | Lorraine's Environmental Change &  Management | Scoop.it
What's happening to biodiversity? We're losing it.

Via Beth Dichter, Sally Egan
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Sally Egan's curator insight, September 4, 2013 6:58 PM

A great series of infographics showing the decline in world biodiversity, the factors threatening biodiversity, why bodiversity is imoportant and hope for teh future. Compiled by World Bank it is useful for students in develoing knowledge and understanding of the importance of global biodiversity in topic Ecosystems at Risk.

Amazon Rainforest Workshops's curator insight, January 28, 2014 9:45 PM

Great infographic for your class discussion on biodiversity

Diane Johnson's curator insight, January 29, 2014 8:17 PM

Biodiversity is the key to a healthy ecosystem. Since there have been at least 6 mass extinctions in Earth's history, we can learn the stress this puts on all parts of the system and how to try to ameliorate the damage.

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Africa's electronic graveyards where the world's 'e-waste' ends up

Africa's electronic graveyards where the world's 'e-waste' ends up | Lorraine's Environmental Change &  Management | Scoop.it
'Millions of tonnes' of electronic waste from western nations like the UK are being exported to African countries like Ghana where they are dumped in huge landfill sites (pictured).
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Rescooped by Lorraine Chaffer from Geography Education
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Motion of Tectonic Plates

"This video is from the BBC documentary film Earth: The Power Of The Planet.  The clip is also embedded in this story map that tells the tale of Earth’s tectonic plates, their secret conspiracies, awe-inspiring exhibitions and subtle impacts on the maps and geospatial information we so often take for granted as unambiguous."


Tags physical, tectonics, disasters, mapping, geospatialmapping, video, ESRI.


Via Seth Dixon
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Rescooped by Lorraine Chaffer from All about water, the oceans, environmental issues
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Map reveals global extinction 'hotspots' where marine life is at risk

Map reveals global extinction 'hotspots' where marine life is at risk | Lorraine's Environmental Change &  Management | Scoop.it
Two separate studies by US universities warn that rising global temperatures mean animals are more likely to face extinction on land and at sea.

Via Kathy Dowsett
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Weather could be controlled using lasers

Weather could be controlled using lasers | Lorraine's Environmental Change &  Management | Scoop.it

Scientists are attempting to control the weather by using lasers to create clouds, induce rain and even trigger lightning.

Professor Jean-Pierre Wolf and Dr Jerome Kasparian, both biophotonics experts at the University of Geneva, have now organised a conference at the WMO next month in an attempt to find ways of speeding up research on the topic. They said: “Ultra-short lasers launched into the atmosphere have emerged as a promising prospective tool for weather modulation and climate studies.

“Such prospects include lightning control and laser-assisted condensation.”


There is a long history of attempts by scientists to control the weather, including using techniques such as cloud seeding.

This involves spraying small particles and chemicals into the air to induce water vapour to condense into clouds.


In the 1960s the United States experimented with using silver iodide in an attempt to weaken hurricanes before they made landfall. The USSR was also claimed to have flown cloud seeding missions in an attempt to create rain clouds to protect Moscow from radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl nuclear disaster.


More recently the Russian Air force has also been reported to have used bags of cement to seed clouds.


Before the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing, the Chinese authorities used aircraft and rockets to release chemicals into the atmosphere.

Other countries have been reported to be experimenting with cloud seeding to prevent flooding or smog.


However, Professor Wolf, Dr Kasparian and their colleagues believe that lasers could provide an easier and more controllable method of changing the weather. They began studying lasers for their use as a way of monitoring changes in the air and detecting aerosols high in the atmosphere.


Experiments using varying pulses of near infra-red laser light and ultraviolet lasers have, however, shown that they cause water to condense. They have subsequently found the lasers induce tiny ice crystals to form, which are a crucial step in the formation of clouds and eventual rainfall.


In new research published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Professor Wolf said the laser beams create plasma channels in the air that caused ice to form.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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GULF OIL DISASTER: FIVE YEARS ON

GULF OIL DISASTER: FIVE YEARS ON | Lorraine's Environmental Change &  Management | Scoop.it
Five years ago, between April and July 2010, over 4.9 million barrels worth of oil poured into the Gulf of Mexico. Geographical looks at how the local environment has attempted to recover from this incident

Via Kathy Dowsett
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Richard Lloyd Thomas's curator insight, May 2, 10:23 AM

Ecosystems at risk