Year 10 Elective History - Violence & Terrorism
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Stringent laws create new terrors

Stringent laws create new terrors | Year 10 Elective History - Violence & Terrorism | Scoop.it
The new terrorism laws expose how we have taken so many of our freedoms for granted.
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South Africa declines Dalai Lama visa

South Africa declines Dalai Lama visa | Year 10 Elective History - Violence & Terrorism | Scoop.it
South Africa has bowed to Chinese pressure and declined to grant the Dalai Lama a visa, forcing him to cancel his attendance at a gathering of Nobel laureates in Cape Town.
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Woman Sentenced To 20 Years For Firing Warning Shot Gets New Trial

Woman Sentenced To 20 Years For Firing Warning Shot Gets New Trial | Year 10 Elective History - Violence & Terrorism | Scoop.it
TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — A Florida woman serving 20 years in prison for firing a shot at her estranged husband during an argument will get a new trial, though she will not be able to invoke a "stand your ground" defense, an appeals court ruled Thursday. The case of Marissa Alexander, a Jacksonville mother of three, has been used by critics of Florida's "stand your ground" law and mandatory minimum sentences to argue that the state's justice system is skewed against defendants who are black.
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India regrets UN's failure to adopt key treaty on terror

India regrets UN's failure to adopt key treaty on terror | Year 10 Elective History - Violence & Terrorism | Scoop.it
UNITED NATIONS: Expressing regret at the international community's failure to conclude a crucial treaty to fight terrorism, India today called on nations to show political will for adopting the...
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PM - What drives someone to become a terrorist? 23/07/2013

PM - What drives someone to become a terrorist? 23/07/2013 | Year 10 Elective History - Violence & Terrorism | Scoop.it
What drives a person to become a terrorist and could acts of terror be prevented? Dr Anne Speckhard is an adjunct associate professor of psychiatry at Georgetown University Medical School and in the
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Hannah Rizzo's comment, September 10, 2013 1:20 AM
This was a very interesting article exploring terrorism. It was interesting to find out about certain terrorist organisations such as Al Qaeda use emotional blackmail hooks and social context to convince and recruit new members, and how society treatment of a person, constantly saying people dont fit in and don't belong can create inner hatred which can influence a person to join a terrorist organisation or commit an act of terrorism against innocent civilians or those who made them feel that way in the first place.
Sarah's comment, September 10, 2013 6:49 PM
As i finished reading this article I became a lot more aware and educated on what drives someone to become a terrorist. I found learning about the Sharia For Belgium movement very interesting. Also, how racism and terrorism can be a result of peer pressure,"because their friends are. Yeah, or not even peer pressure; peer fun!" In addition, I agreed with how terrorism starts with instilled anger with a particular racial group or organisation, "...a bit of anger in the soul, and most people are going to deal with that anger just by maybe smashing a car window in...but the few and far between that then have an exposure to a group and an ideology may go that way."
Laura Boyd's comment, September 10, 2013 10:06 PM
I was very interested in this article particularly because of the Al Qaeda recruitment video and reading about such things. Most people including myself until now are unaware of these practices and are influenced by news coverage etc. that lead us to think they have no real sense. We are lead to believe that these terrorists are crazy and do not have a logical reason, simply blood thirsty men who the good guys need to stop. Now, I'm not endorsing it or standing up for these men and women but it is interesting to be let into the mind of a terrorist and learn why exactly they are driven to commit such acts. The way that the recruiters use such persuasive techniques is scary to us because it makes us understand that there is some sort of intellectual capability among these violent men which can make for much worse consequences. The man threatened Hamad's current home and as someone who already felt isolated and unwanted, this was the push he needed to rebel against society who 'did not have a place for him'. I am not justifying their actions in any way, however it is incredibly interesting to gain an insight into why and how one is driven to become a Terrorist
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From 'terrorist' to tea with the Queen

From 'terrorist' to tea with the Queen | Year 10 Elective History - Violence & Terrorism | Scoop.it
'This hero worship is very much misplaced'- John Carlisle MP, on the BBC screening of the Free Nelson Mandela concert in 1990
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Lizzie Hayes's comment, September 10, 2013 12:43 AM
This article reflects how Nelson Mandela, who today is no seen as a social and political icon and hero. By leading the country of South Africa away from segregation and giving more rights and opportunities to the majority suppressed black population in South Africa. He improved poverty, racism and inequality through revolution and became the first Black President of South Africa in 1994. However through out Mandela's political life and the way he campaigned to gain equal rights in South Africa many politician from Western Countries saw him as a terrorist and a threat. This article explores how socially and politically circumstances of violence and whether what Mandela instructed to gain this freedom was right. At the time Mandela was seen by many as dangerous, he is now one of the most regarded and respected men in the world and his achievement for ending segregation in South Africa will forever be remembered. The question that this article raises how can people particularly politicians brand someone a terrorist, which makes that person have a terrible reputation, then turn around years later and say, no i was mistaken, i didn't mean it Mandela is a freedom fighter, his actions were to free his people. This makes you question when is violence right and when is someone a terrorist?
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Mind of a terrorist

Mind of a terrorist | Year 10 Elective History - Violence & Terrorism | Scoop.it
A love of guns and armed conflict, rather than religious zeal, led a young man to a heinous act of violence.
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Maddie Forrester's comment, September 10, 2013 9:57 PM
This article increased my awareness of what drives a person to become a terrorist. As agreed upon in our class discussion the description of lacking hope appears to be both an accurate and key factor in a person deciding to get involved in acts of terror. The article also shows how terrorist groups exploit and target people who generally have a negative world view. Their strongest recruitment tool is what is referred to as indoctrination. I also found it hard to understand the level of despair a person must be at in order to turn to such extremities.
Sabine Pyne's comment, September 10, 2013 10:18 PM
This article was extremely insightful in what drives someone to become a terrorist. Terrorists are rarely captured and trained to either die or escape. This is what makes this article individual as it gives a first hand recount into the life of a terrorist. I rarely think of terrorists as people because how can they complete such atrocious acts however, still be humane? But this article enables me to understand what would drive someone to terrorism and the indoctrination used to brain wash and use once innocent people. The use of ‘hope’ and the knowledge that their lives could drastically improve temps and prevails in many people. Although their actions are not being justified in this article in enables onlookers to understand what could potentially drive someone to such inhuman acts.
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Action on inept anti-terror laws must get priority

Action on inept anti-terror laws must get priority | Year 10 Elective History - Violence & Terrorism | Scoop.it
Last week on budget day the federal government released two independent reports on Australia's anti-terrorism laws.
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Dozens of anti-Muslim attacks as Islamic leaders warn of community fear

Dozens of anti-Muslim attacks as Islamic leaders warn of community fear | Year 10 Elective History - Violence & Terrorism | Scoop.it
There have been at least 30 attacks against Muslims – mainly women wearing the hijab – in the three weeks since the police anti-terror raids and threats by Islamic State put relations between the Islamic community and mainstream Australia on edge.
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IRA suspects to lose immunity from prosecution as Britain dumps 'comfort letters'

IRA suspects to lose immunity from prosecution as Britain dumps 'comfort letters' | Year 10 Elective History - Violence & Terrorism | Scoop.it
Hundreds of Irish Republican Army terrorism suspects no longer have immunity from prosecution and could face court if police find enough evidence.
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Terrorists: the word from inside their minds

Terrorists: the word from inside their minds | Year 10 Elective History - Violence & Terrorism | Scoop.it
Have you wondered what it would be like to talk to a terrorist?
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Angelique Souma's comment, September 10, 2013 1:10 AM
This article was very confronting but also challenged my views of terrorists and the affect that their actions have on their health and lives. It was great that she got first hand knowledge on the terrorists and was able to immerse herself into their lives to come to the conclusion that around their families they act as any normal person would. It also shocked not the way they saw their actions as perfectly normal but rather how they related themselves to soldiers of a national army, or any army solider. I admire her courage because I feel that it would be extremely difficult to live amongst and talk to terrorist people.
Jacqueline Hayes's comment, September 10, 2013 1:17 AM
I thought the article and interview with Anne Speckhard was extremely informative. She interview families of terrorist bomber from the west bank and Gaza. It was interesting that she began talking about her experiences and her unsettling feelings that these people that conded kiling innocent people but are simple hospitable and act normally. She also discussed the perceived idea that the families celebrate that their child went and murder them-self. She said this was incorrect that they families ind out in horrible was of their child's death. Anne used a relatable comparison that like a family being proud of their son or daughter's efforts in war when the coffin comes home. That at that moment it is their public role so they go along with it. It is that the grief and anger is expressed privately. Also the fact that in conflict zones 60-80% of the population after suffering from post traumatic stress. It is the most vulnerable people as the terrorist organisations target. Overall it was very interesting and gave me a better understanding.
RCue's comment, September 10, 2013 9:05 AM
I would like to agree with all the comments posted above mine as I found this article to be very intriguing and informative as it exhibited the various perspectives terrorists had on their acts. I also found that the range of motives and justifications that the the terrorists had to be quite confronting as we, the public, are never made to think about what the reasons that drove these people to be terrorists.
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Imperial History of the Middle East

Maps-of-War is a multimedia site dedicated to producing diverse, creative visuals that enhance our understanding of war and its history.
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Bomb response refreshingly honest

Bomb response refreshingly honest | Year 10 Elective History - Violence & Terrorism | Scoop.it
Let's clear something up: our responses to terrorism are not about the loss of innocent life. We think they are because that's the first thing we talk about. We use the suffering of victims to emote, and we look at the attacks through that prism.
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Pakistan poll will be bloody for all, Taliban promises

Pakistan poll will be bloody for all, Taliban promises | Year 10 Elective History - Violence & Terrorism | Scoop.it
Islamabad: The Taliban have vowed a nationwide campaign of terrorism targeting candidates and voters in Saturday's general election in Pakistan.
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Drawing the line: when does a murder become terrorism?

Drawing the line: when does a murder become terrorism? | Year 10 Elective History - Violence & Terrorism | Scoop.it
Two men hack a soldier to death on a London street. Is it terrorism, or just a horrific crime?
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