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Rescooped by Ian Lin from Green economic development and social changes
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Icelandic Ambassador Says Japan Could Replace 25 Nuclear Plants Using Geothermal Energy - Climate Change Policy & Practice

Icelandic Ambassador Says Japan Could Replace 25 Nuclear Plants Using Geothermal Energy - Climate Change Policy & Practice | Yan's Earth | Scoop.it

During a lecture as part of the UN University’s (UNU) Ambassador Lecture Series, Stefan Stefansson, Ambassador of Iceland to Japan, said Japan could replace 25 nuclear reactors by developing its geothermal resources, and recommended Japan harnesses geothermal energy resources to minimize carbon dioxide emissions, lower heating bills and create jobs.


Via Jón Sallé
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Jón Sallé's curator insight, December 20, 2012 7:12 AM

In Iceland, geothermal energy is mainly used to heat houses and not to produce electricity.

Rescooped by Ian Lin from sustainable architecture
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Materiality, Light + Thermal Control: House in Yamasaki by Tato Architects

Materiality, Light + Thermal Control: House in Yamasaki by Tato Architects | Yan's Earth | Scoop.it

Located in a residential area in Hyogo Prefecture, the house was designed for a family with two children. “The residents requested that, as the area has short hours of sunlight in winter, they’d like to bring in as much light as possible,” said Yo Shimada of Tato Architects.

 

More from the architects:

I wanted to create light, stable indoor climate and came up with a plan of three sheds of house type arranged on a 1.8 m high foundation platform. The first floor was lowered by 760 mm below ground to optimize the heating system and regulate temperature, while preserving views to the surrounding mountains and sky for the entire residential neighborhood.

The bathroom shed and the sunroom shed provide lighting and ventilation for the lower floor and form an overhead courtyard. The sunroom collects heat in winter, and exhausts heat in summer through the five motor-operated windows.

Corrugated polycarbonate panels are used for outer walls of the three sheds to take in solar radiation, with moisture and water-absorbing sheets between the panels and structure.The inside of the walls are formed with a heat insulating layer, and the ceiling and walls of bathroom are further filled up with light transmitting thermal insulation material of reproduced PET bottles.

 

A house appearing as small as a peasant’s work shed of an innovative material as corrugated panels creates a new vernacular in this agricultural area. Read the article and view more photos of this very unique house that connects new and old within the rural landscape.


Via Lauren Moss
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Rescooped by Ian Lin from Sustain Our Earth
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The 8 Level Rooftop Park in Osaka, Japan

The 8 Level Rooftop Park in Osaka, Japan | Yan's Earth | Scoop.it

When Osaka’s baseball stadium closed its doors, it opened the door to a prime redevelopment opportunity in a new commercial district adjacent to Namba Train Station, the first stop from Kansai Airport. Given the location, owner Nankai Electric Railway asked Jon Jerde to create a gateway that would redefine Osaka’s identity.
Jerde conceived Namba Parks as a large park, a natural intervention in Osaka’s dense and harsh urban condition. Alongside a 30-story tower, the project features a lifestyle commercial center (with 120 tenants) crowned with a rooftop park that crosses multiple blocks while gradually ascending eight levels.
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Via F|Mattiuzzo, landscape architecture &sustainability, SustainOurEarth
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