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Infographic: Companies unprepared to address resource scarcities

Infographic:  Companies unprepared to address resource scarcities | Yan's Earth | Scoop.it

New research shows that many businesses around the world won’t start planning until 2018. Is this too late?

Despite widespread warnings of resource scarcity over the next few decades, a significant proportion of global businesses are not prepared to address the predicted shortfall, according to new research by Carbon Trust.
The U.K.-based organization’s survey of 475 executives in the U.S., Brazil, China, Korea and the U.K. revealed while a majority acknowledged that their companies would have to charge more for their products and services as a result of resource constraints, 43 percent are not monitoring risks posed by incidents such as energy price increases and environmental disasters. Over 50 percent have not developed goals to reduce their company’s consumption of water, waste production or carbon emissions...

View the Carbon Trust infographic for more details on the survey.


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Duane Craig's curator insight, December 20, 2012 11:19 AM

And, the construction sector is woefully unprepared...

Jim Gramata's curator insight, December 21, 2012 10:37 PM

The earth is bounded and its resources finite. Hopefully it will be a proactive and not reactive decision to do what is critical to the sustainability of the earth. Spread the word....

Mercor's curator insight, January 31, 2013 9:50 AM

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Responding to the Landscape: Archipelago House by Tham & Videgård Arkitekter

Responding to the Landscape: Archipelago House by Tham & Videgård Arkitekter | Yan's Earth | Scoop.it

The goal for this project was to provide a direct relationship with the dramatic archipelago landscape and to create a simple platform which would offer several diverse readings of the relationship between space and nature. Conceived as a light-weight construction in wood and glass and located in Stockholm’s outer archipelago, this summer house was built within the specific conditions prevailing on the island.

Without any car access, all materials had to be brought by boat from the mainland. Wood was chosen throughout the design in order to provide simplicity of construction and to minimize difficulties with heavy transportation.

The horizontal character of the black-stained exterior relates to the verticality of the island’s tall pines, and mirrored views of the Baltic Sea. The geometry of the plan is generated by the specifics of the site; the house sits on a flat surface between two rocky outcrops, and is oriented simultaneously towards the sun in south and towards sea views in the west. With smaller rooms placed behind, the three large social areas of the house open up to the terrace and provide an open platform, criss-crossed by sliding glass...

 

Visit the article link for more images, as well as additional details on the sustainable strategies incorporated into the design and construction of this modern home...


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Hotel Elqui Domos, Chile: Sitting lightly within the desert landscape

Hotel Elqui Domos, Chile: Sitting lightly within the desert landscape | Yan's Earth | Scoop.it

Bordering the Atacama Desert in Chile’s Andes Mountains, Valle de Elqui boasts an abundance of natural assets including a stable, hot climate favorable for wine growing and postcard-clear skies, coupled with high natural magnetism for some of the best star gazing in the Southern Hemisphere.

Resting in the heart of the valley, Hotel Elqui Domos provides a unique eco-tourism accommodation experience through its spatial composition and relationship to place. The original complex was designed by architects Rodrigo Duque Motta as a series of seven geodesic dome tents.

Recently, the hotel has added four wooden cabanas, each intended as a private observatory and space for introspection. Perching very lightly on the landscape, the cabins negotiate the views of the valley and mountain from opposing sides. Their stilt-like foundations are sympathetic to the surrounding vegetation and topographical variations in the land, and the upper roof decks accentuate their privileged position within the site’s geography...


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Stripe House: A beautiful, efficient live/work townhouse in the Netherlands

Stripe House: A beautiful, efficient live/work townhouse in the Netherlands | Yan's Earth | Scoop.it

The Stripe House is an energy efficient and naturally daylit home in Leiden, The Netherlands and was designed by local firm, GAAGA. Encased in a handmade plaster facade and brightly daylit from a host of windows, the compact home doubles as an office and is very energy efficient by design.

 

Sited on a corner lot near a park, the home does its best to make the best of the compact plot. Three stories tall, the home creates space with vertical floor area, but still retains a small garden space from which to enjoy the exterior and the neighborhood, also providing a soft transition from public to private space as well as distance from the neighboring houses.

The ground floor is used as an office, while the first and second floors are for the family. The first floor living space has an open living/kitchen floor plan, and two bedrooms and a bath are located on the top floor. A void between the living space and the bedrooms creates a connection via operable shutters.

Large windows on the the three open sides of the home are oriented towards interesting views and fill the bright white interior with natural daylight. The exterior is very tactile with a beautiful handcrafted plaster facade created with linear molds.

Beyond daylighting, the Stripe house is also a very sustainable house that scores well in several energy performance and environmental index calculations and labels- making it an efficient and beautiful example of innovative green design.

 


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