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Floating Light Park Skyscraper Uses Solar Power & Helium to Hover Above Beijing

Floating Light Park Skyscraper Uses Solar Power & Helium to Hover Above Beijing | Yan's Earth | Scoop.it

Light Park is a skyscraper that hovers over the streets of Beijing like a giant airship. Architects Ting Xu and Yiming Chen have conceived the future of high-rises to be a conglomerate of mega-structures that make up for the shortage of urban open spaces on the ground by lifting them up in the air.


The Light Park skyscraper is lifted off the ground with a helium-filled balloon, and it uses solar energy for propulsion, enabling it to function as a non-polluting transportation deck as well as a floating urban park. The technology is based on existing helium balloon designs, using solar-powered propellers, airbags and atmospheric pressure for takeoff and cruise flight. Solar power is utilized to power the uses below, with translucent solar panels located on the top of the aircraft. In order to avoid additional weight and decrease wind resistance, the skyscraper uses a cable-suspended structure to attach the slabs to the mushroom-like cap. The planting slabs are irrigated with rainwater collected on the large cap surface and are distributed in a way which allows maximum exposure to sunlight on each level...



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Amber Qureshi's curator insight, April 8, 2013 1:19 PM

Daaamnnn :O 

Noor Fatima's comment, April 9, 2013 10:01 AM
incredibleeeee
Amber Qureshi's comment, April 12, 2013 3:12 AM
Ikr :D
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The Netherlands Institute of Ecology: Raising the Bar with Cradle-to-Cradle Design

The Netherlands Institute of Ecology: Raising the Bar with Cradle-to-Cradle Design | Yan's Earth | Scoop.it

The Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO) is a truly innovative green laboratory.

 

From NIOO director Louise Vet: ”Ecologists... do high-level research on genomes and biodiversity, and I wanted the building to express this.” Thus, she chose Claus en Kaan Architecten, a Dutch architectural practice with a track record in laboratory design and challenged the architects to design a building that embodied cradle-to-cradle principles.

 

Claua en Kaan rose to the challenge with a variety of sustainable strategies. The linear building, 335 feet by 100 feet, has west-facing, sealed laboratories that manage heat gain via a deep brise-soleil. Windows on the east side are operable, allowing daylight and views of the surrounding environment, populated with native plants.

Vertical light-wells span two floors; a core of support labs not requiring daylight occupies the center of the building. The building’s columns were spaced in such a way as to allow for flexibility in future renovation, which is likely to prove a key factor in its longevity, and a green roof shares space with a roof deck.

Heating and cooling is handled via underground storage, making use of deep vertical pipes that store heat from solar arrays and the building at 984 feet below ground. A radiant, in-floor system circulates the warmed water through the concrete floors.

Additionally, the building treats all of its own greywater on site, and releases it into the surrounding landscape.


The architects here are to be commended on this design, as green laboratories are notoriously hard to design. By embodying cradle-to-cradle principles — as well as tailored green build strategies — the Netherlands Institute of Ecology raises the bar.


Via Lauren Moss
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Low-Energy Bamboo House Blends into the Belgian Forest

Low-Energy Bamboo House Blends into the Belgian Forest | Yan's Earth | Scoop.it

With amenities such as a heat pump, radiant heating, rainwater collection and high-performance insulation, this modern bamboo-clad house by Belgian design firm AST 77 is as energy efficient as it is attractive.


Upending the stereotypical image of the flat countryside of Flanders, a new low energy house mixes modernism and organic materials to blend into a steep, forested hillside near Rotselaar, Belgium.

The chief exterior materials of are bamboo poles lined up in precise rows along the rectangular 86-foot-long steel-frame box, broken up by a series of square windows positioned for natural ventilation and passive solar.The overall visual effect is reminiscent of a tree trunk rising out of the hilly terrain...


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CO2ngress Towers: Reducing air pollution in Chicago + increasing public awareness

CO2ngress Towers:  Reducing air pollution in Chicago + increasing public awareness | Yan's Earth | Scoop.it

“Every day, 77,000 carbon-emitting vehicles fly past the Congress Parkway interchange, polluting the air. This project creates a gateway over the corridor that filters air and fuels a new breed of car for its residents.”

Aimed to increase public awareness and improve public health, the CO2ngress Gateway Towers absorb the CO2 emissions from passing cars, which is fed to algae grown in the building. The algae then helps with the processing of biofuels which supply the building residents’ eco-friendly cars.

The two towers split and converge at the top to create an iconic gateway to the city. A bridge joins the two towers and contains a public restaurant with views of neighboring buildings. Pedestrian connections are landscaped at the base, giving a human scale to a car-centric urban identity.

Additionally, the double-skin facade helps reduce traffic noise and offers enclosed balconies. Natural cross-ventilation of the units is enabled through the building’s atrium. The terraces are enclosed by bio-reactor tubes which grow the algae responsible for biofuel processing...


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Avneel Channan's curator insight, March 27, 2015 8:27 AM

This is a very innovative way of clearing C02 from the air. This is only the beginning of what this technology can bring to renewable energy and can really become evolutionary not to far from the future.  

Zohair Ahmed's curator insight, May 26, 2015 11:57 PM

These two buildings reduce air pollution in Chicago by absorbing CO2 from cars and feeding it to algae grown inside the building.


This architectual concept is very amazing, for it may influence many other buildings to do a similar process of removing pollution. Pollution from transportation is affiliated with Unit 7 as an Urban environmental issue.

Clayton Nelson's curator insight, December 3, 2015 10:06 AM

This is a great and awesome idea! Not only do they help the environment their appearance is also awesome. Now someone should convince all other large cities to build these.  CN