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Rescooped by Ian Lin from green infographics
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Infographic: Companies unprepared to address resource scarcities

Infographic:  Companies unprepared to address resource scarcities | Yan's Earth | Scoop.it

New research shows that many businesses around the world won’t start planning until 2018. Is this too late?

Despite widespread warnings of resource scarcity over the next few decades, a significant proportion of global businesses are not prepared to address the predicted shortfall, according to new research by Carbon Trust.
The U.K.-based organization’s survey of 475 executives in the U.S., Brazil, China, Korea and the U.K. revealed while a majority acknowledged that their companies would have to charge more for their products and services as a result of resource constraints, 43 percent are not monitoring risks posed by incidents such as energy price increases and environmental disasters. Over 50 percent have not developed goals to reduce their company’s consumption of water, waste production or carbon emissions...

View the Carbon Trust infographic for more details on the survey.


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Duane Craig's curator insight, December 20, 2012 11:19 AM

And, the construction sector is woefully unprepared...

Jim Gramata's curator insight, December 21, 2012 10:37 PM

The earth is bounded and its resources finite. Hopefully it will be a proactive and not reactive decision to do what is critical to the sustainability of the earth. Spread the word....

Mercor's curator insight, January 31, 2013 9:50 AM

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Rescooped by Ian Lin from sustainable architecture
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CO2ngress Towers: Reducing air pollution in Chicago + increasing public awareness

CO2ngress Towers:  Reducing air pollution in Chicago + increasing public awareness | Yan's Earth | Scoop.it

“Every day, 77,000 carbon-emitting vehicles fly past the Congress Parkway interchange, polluting the air. This project creates a gateway over the corridor that filters air and fuels a new breed of car for its residents.”

Aimed to increase public awareness and improve public health, the CO2ngress Gateway Towers absorb the CO2 emissions from passing cars, which is fed to algae grown in the building. The algae then helps with the processing of biofuels which supply the building residents’ eco-friendly cars.

The two towers split and converge at the top to create an iconic gateway to the city. A bridge joins the two towers and contains a public restaurant with views of neighboring buildings. Pedestrian connections are landscaped at the base, giving a human scale to a car-centric urban identity.

Additionally, the double-skin facade helps reduce traffic noise and offers enclosed balconies. Natural cross-ventilation of the units is enabled through the building’s atrium. The terraces are enclosed by bio-reactor tubes which grow the algae responsible for biofuel processing...


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Avneel Channan's curator insight, March 27, 2015 8:27 AM

This is a very innovative way of clearing C02 from the air. This is only the beginning of what this technology can bring to renewable energy and can really become evolutionary not to far from the future.  

Zohair Ahmed's curator insight, May 26, 2015 11:57 PM

These two buildings reduce air pollution in Chicago by absorbing CO2 from cars and feeding it to algae grown inside the building.


This architectual concept is very amazing, for it may influence many other buildings to do a similar process of removing pollution. Pollution from transportation is affiliated with Unit 7 as an Urban environmental issue.

Clayton Nelson's curator insight, December 3, 2015 10:06 AM

This is a great and awesome idea! Not only do they help the environment their appearance is also awesome. Now someone should convince all other large cities to build these.  CN