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First-of-its-kind Global Atlas for renewables debuts - Renewable Energy Magazine, at the heart of clean energy journalism

First-of-its-kind Global Atlas for renewables debuts - Renewable Energy Magazine, at the heart of clean energy journalism | Yan's Earth | Scoop.it
First-of-its-kind Global Atlas for renewables debuts - Renewable Energy Magazine, at the heart of clean energy journalism

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Christian Aymé's curator insight, January 15, 2013 10:40 PM

 Potentiellement renouvelable

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5 Biofuel Trends to Watch Out for in 2013

5 Biofuel Trends to Watch Out for in 2013 | Yan's Earth | Scoop.it
2012 saw the introduction of next generation, advanced biorefineries. Here we look at the trends that will hit the biofuel market in 2013, including; Green Diesel, Decline of Oil,

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Duane Tilden's curator insight, January 16, 2013 12:51 AM

The Retreat of Oil Majors

Trend: Oil Majors double down on “Golden Age of Gas” while narrowing investments across the advanced biofuel space.

An early strategic investor in the advanced biofuels industry, global oil majors have begun trimming excess fat from their biofuel investment portfolios over the past couple of years. BP, a leading investor in the biofuels industry, pulled out of its commercial Highlands Park project in Florida in October 2012 to refocus on R&D efforts. Shell, meanwhile, has dropped a number of investments across the advanced biofuels landscape, concentrating its commercialization efforts on its Raizen joint venture with Cosan in Brazil.

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LuminAID: The Inflatable, Rechargeable Solar Lantern

LuminAID: The Inflatable, Rechargeable Solar Lantern | Yan's Earth | Scoop.it
In the wake of natural disasters, one thing that often gets overlooked is the need for cheap, reliable lighting. There are, of course, solar lanterns and flashlights on the market.

Via Kalani Kirk Hausman
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Rescooped by Ian Lin from Sustainable, Creative, Innovative Design Solutions
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A Giant Synthetic Crystal Explodes Through Gallery Floors at the School 33 Art Center in Baltimore | Colossal

A Giant Synthetic Crystal Explodes Through Gallery Floors at the School 33 Art Center in Baltimore | Colossal | Yan's Earth | Scoop.it

Points of Contention is a 2011 installation by Jonathan Latiano that was installed in a gallery space at the School 33 Art Center in Baltimore. The piece features an explosive crystal growth protruding from a rippling gallery floor that is meant to call into question the continued production of plastics, resins and polymers and their long-term impact on the geological landscape around us. Via a press release for the exhibition:

Driven by the exploration of time, motion and the physics of the natural world, Jonathan Latiano presents Points of Contention, a site-specific installation sculpture that investigates the increasingly blurred line between the organic and inorganic as well as the spatial boundaries of where the spectacle begins and ends. Convergent forms of crystalline growth and explosive impact reinforce the hundreds of shards of custom cut and painted elements used to create the centerpiece of the exhibition. Through the use of reclaimed and altered wood, plastic, Styrofoam and site-grown salt crystals Latiano explores the question: At what point do the controversies of the present become the “new norms” of the future?

Latiano will return to School 33 Art Center in September of 2013 as part of a collaboration with artist Jennifer Strunge who is known for her creation of totally bizarre and wonderful cotton monsters. Can’t wait to see what the two do together!

If you liked this piece, also check out the work of Chris Whiteburch, and the Inversion House by Dan Havel and Dean Ruck. (via razorshapes)


Via Susan Davis Cushing
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Rescooped by Ian Lin from Eco-Friendly Digest
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A 'green' success story

Mr Vineet Mittal, a serial entrepreneur, currently at the helm of Welspun Energy, is known for his visionary leadership and execution abilities. His strong e...

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Rescooped by Ian Lin from Towards A Sustainable Planet: Priorities
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The GREEN MARKET ORACLE: Children and the Future of Sustainability

The GREEN MARKET ORACLE: Children and the Future of Sustainability | Yan's Earth | Scoop.it

As the most vulnerable members of our societies, environmental destruction impacts children first and foremost. Children are also those who are most likely to endure the impacts of a polluted environment over the longest period. Climate change is already killing one thousand children every day. The importance of educating children about the environment was addressed at theRio+ conference. There are some basic sustainability issues that must be addressed. Things like clean water and clean air are basic concerns that are fundamentally important to many children all around the world.

In the world today there are 2.6 billion people are without access to basic sanitation; 67 million children of primary school age are out of school. A lack water and sanitation services which is a leading cause of mortality for both children and their mothers. Indoor air pollution from particulate matter is responsible for 900,000 deaths in children under the age of five.

An environmental education is important to children because they will be called upon to solve unimaginable challenges in their lifetime. They will desperately need the knowledge and tools necessary for survival in the 21st Century. (more)


Via Susan Davis Cushing
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Rescooped by Ian Lin from Green economic development and social changes
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How to feed the world without destroying it [Infographic]

How to feed the world without destroying it [Infographic] | Yan's Earth | Scoop.it
Want to address world hunger — not to mention climate change, poverty and pollution? Here's how taking a more natural approach to agriculture can benefit everyone and everything from the soil up.

Via Flora Moon, Jón Sallé
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Rescooped by Ian Lin from Trends in Sustainability
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MAN

Good video illustrating Man’s relationship with the natural world.

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Rescooped by Ian Lin from World Environment Nature News
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Top 10 most viewed environment videos of 2012

Top 10 most viewed environment videos of 2012 | Yan's Earth | Scoop.it
From Chasing Ice to the largest python ever recorded, here are 2012's most viewed environment videos (RT @guardianeco: Top 10 most viewed environment videos of 2012 http://t.co/6hCihImw)...

Via Maria Nunzia @Varvera
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綠好物's curator insight, December 28, 2012 12:44 AM

2012全球十大環境生態影片 

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Low-Energy Bamboo House Blends into the Belgian Forest

Low-Energy Bamboo House Blends into the Belgian Forest | Yan's Earth | Scoop.it

With amenities such as a heat pump, radiant heating, rainwater collection and high-performance insulation, this modern bamboo-clad house by Belgian design firm AST 77 is as energy efficient as it is attractive.


Upending the stereotypical image of the flat countryside of Flanders, a new low energy house mixes modernism and organic materials to blend into a steep, forested hillside near Rotselaar, Belgium.

The chief exterior materials of are bamboo poles lined up in precise rows along the rectangular 86-foot-long steel-frame box, broken up by a series of square windows positioned for natural ventilation and passive solar.The overall visual effect is reminiscent of a tree trunk rising out of the hilly terrain...


Via Lauren Moss
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Rescooped by Ian Lin from All about water, the oceans, environmental issues
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Din of tankers could drive whales away from the north coast

Din of tankers could drive whales away from the north coast | Yan's Earth | Scoop.it
Some of B.C.'s quietest and most critical stretches of whale habitat could be transformed for the worse by increased shipping noise associated with Enbridge's Northern Gateway and other planned projects on the north coast.

Via Kathy Dowsett
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Rescooped by Ian Lin from Sustain Our Earth
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82 iconic world landmarks to visit

82 iconic world landmarks to visit | Yan's Earth | Scoop.it
Some buildings and features are so well known they have become icons of place.

 

This is a great collection of important world landmarks including the pictured Potala Palace in the Tibetan city of Lhasa.  Who wouldn't like to see some of these places?   

 

Tags: geo-inspiration, tourism, images.


Via Seth Dixon, landscape architecture &sustainability, SustainOurEarth
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Sophia Schroeder's comment, September 1, 2013 5:02 PM
All of these landmarks are beautiful. It's very interesting to see how much culture, especially religion, has shaped these "must see places." Also, I felt like I was traveling through time and got to examine the feats of new architectural eras, though some would debate that architectural works from the past are more outstanding strictly by the means in which they built these masterpieces. It needs to be said (to add to the wonderment of these places) that most of these monuments are built in places where the overall economic status is low; to see things like temples and churches of such great magnitude and beauty built with such craftsmanship, dedication, and money (even though it is scarce) shows how much they rely on their faith. I was also disappointed to see that the two monuments displayed for America, the Lincoln Memorial and the St. Louis Arch, were, in my opinion, not the best picks. Compared to the other landmarks ours feel so mundane, so void of history and culture (maybe, that's because I have grown up seeing them all my life and their meaning and awe has deteriorated to me.) I guess this can be attributed, in part, to the fact that our country is newer and has not yet grown enough to have the rich history including the trials and tribulations in which other countries have had which makes their culture more fascinating and intriguing to me.
Mary Rack's comment, September 1, 2013 9:49 PM
Sophia, Thanks for your very fine comment! I agree with you entirely, and especially about the Lincoln Memorial and St Louis Arch. Better choices might be the Grand Canyon, the Giant Sequoia trees in California, the National Cathedral in DC, or even Mt Rushmore? And some of the ancient cliff dwellings in the Southwest are amazing. Too bad they did not consult us.
Mary Rack's comment, September 1, 2013 9:51 PM
PS ... or the Hoover Dam?
Rescooped by Ian Lin from All about water, the oceans, environmental issues
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A Wing That Lets You Fly Underwater

What would you say if I told you there was a magical machine that combined scuba diving with hang gliding, required no training, and offered...

Via Kathy Dowsett
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Inside the meat lab: the future of food

Inside the meat lab: the future of food | Yan's Earth | Scoop.it

The future feast is laid out around a cool white room at Eindhoven's University of Technology . There is a steak tartare of in-vitro beef fibre, wittily knitted into the word "meat". There are "fruit-meat" amuse-gueules. The green- and pink-striped sushi comes from a genetically modified vegetarian fish called the biccio that, usefully, has green- and pink-striped flesh. To wash this down, there's a programmable red wine: with a microwave pulse you can turn it into anything from Montepulciano to a Syrah. For the kids, there are sweet fried crickets, programmable colas and "magic meatballs". These are made from animal-friendly artificial meat grown from stem cells: packed with Omega 3 and vitamins, they "crackle in your mouth". Yum.


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Olive Ventures's curator insight, January 15, 2013 11:25 PM

the only way for everyone to eat like a "foodie"?

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Rotterdam’s Solar-Powered Floating Pavilion is an Experimental Climate-Proof Development

Rotterdam’s Solar-Powered Floating Pavilion is an Experimental Climate-Proof Development | Yan's Earth | Scoop.it

Rotterdam’s Floating Pavilion by Deltasync and PublicDomain Architects is the first pilot project for a sustainable floating district.


In an effort to address the challenges of climate change and sea level rise, the City of Rotterdam has started to build some intriguing floating structures. The first pilot project is a catalyst for climate change-proof architecture called the Floating Pavilion that consists of three connected hemispheres that look like bubbles anchored within the Dutch city’s old harbor.

An initiative of Rotterdam Climate Proof (part of the Rotterdam Climate Initiative), the mixed-use pavilion was designed by Deltasync and Public Domain Architects, and it sets an unprecedented example for innovative, sustainable and climate-proof architecture.


Via Lauren Moss
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bancoideas's curator insight, January 3, 2013 10:34 AM

Que no se diga que no se puede

François Lanthier's curator insight, January 3, 2013 1:16 PM

Quel projet créatif!

ElenaArcausdeLabadie's comment, January 9, 2013 4:16 PM
Impresionante proyecto, qué tecnología constructiva!
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12 Bellwether Biofuels Projects for 2013 - Biofuels Digest

12 Bellwether Biofuels Projects for 2013 - Biofuels Digest | Yan's Earth | Scoop.it
12 Bellwether Biofuels Projects for 2013
Biofuels Digest
divining-rod A long war of opinion has been waged for years between advanced biofuels' detractors and supporters. Mirage or reality?

Via Claire Poole
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Aquaponics will feed nations | Lj4

Posted on12/17/2012

There are excellent reasons why everybody should discover a way to harvest their own organic food. Aquaponics creates a clean, healthy and balanced and sustainable source of fresh food as well as an effective protein source that is vital {with the looming food shortages {about  to happen worldwide.

In current many years there has been a good surge of people who are trying their {hand at generating their own Aquaponics systems, correct in their own backyards. These people are loving  aquaponics for beginners and are blazing a path to remain objective it is important to consider future of survival.

You need not be an expert to make sufficient food to feed yourself, your family and even many of your neighbors if you try. 

The vegetable and fruits that are developed in an aquaponics {system are 100% natural without any kind of chemical additives.It’s all natural and based on nature this cycle and you can uss it to grow foods quickly.The nitrogen feeds the growingvegetables and what the greens do not consume, is after that passed back to the fish after the normal micro organisms havedone their job. The fish’s waste are ammonia which is broken down into nitrates and after that is recirculated back again into the plants.
A simple system that is self sustaining and grows food as well as feeds the fish with just a little help.

 

Most of the best fish can be developed in an aquaponics system for their Omega 3 fatty acids, protien and used to reproduce for even more stock. When your aquaponics system is up and running, nature pretty considerably requires care of the rest. 

 

The FDA is putting far more limitations on farmers and what they are producing is lesser and lesser quality of foods that are becomming more nutritionally devoid.In addition, big manufacturers like Monsanto are genetically altering seeds, and it seems there is a war on organic foods.With food shortages, growing food prices, now is the time to highly consider your own system.Aquaponics calls for small room, produces food often far more swiftly in contrast to basic horticulture methods and it is lasting.Far more nations globally are kindled foods enjoy corn and sugar as a fuel finds and ravenous their population.Aquaponics can change that. Many governmental studies have been done worldwide, researching aquaponics.A lot of them agree on certain things. The super food in an aquponics hard drive grows 8 occasions quicker using 4 times more the density. If you ponder how that on your own could feed a population, the final results are staggering.In most 3rd world nations aquaponics could practically get rid of starvation. Within two many years the word hunger could stop to exist owing to aquaponics.

Via Susan Davis Cushing
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Susan Davis Cushing's curator insight, February 9, 2013 11:43 PM

Seriously, an inspriational article, initially posted over a month ago. It's for the Sunday list. :) Aquaponics is growing expnentially because of the efficiency of food production and adaptability to a variety of growing environments.

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Community Power: Renewing Communities Through Renewable Energy

Community Power: Renewing Communities Through Renewable Energy | Yan's Earth | Scoop.it

There is much meaning behind the name Community Power. It does not only refer to electrical power generated by a community; it also implies individual and community empowerment.

Community Power enables individuals to take steps towards the betterment of the environment, their communities, and also their personal finances. It also enables these individuals to gather for a common purpose and achieve something extraordinary, as a community. This is where true economic, environmental and social sustainability lies. Through igniting individual behaviour change and community solidarity, Community Power starts an empowering process that enables communities to provide local solutions to their local needs for the long term.


Via Hans De Keulenaer, Duane Tilden
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UtilityTree's curator insight, December 28, 2012 11:30 AM

for more like this post, please like us on FB http://goo.gl/5H4YE

Duane Tilden's curator insight, December 28, 2012 8:16 PM

"A National Renewable Energy Laboratory study found that the impact of community-owned projects on jobs creation during construction period is 1.1 to 1.3 times higher than corporate ones, and 1.1 to 2.8 times higher during operations period.

 

The employment and investment impact of community-owned projects can also go beyond a local community. Community ownership played a pivotal role in Germany and Denmark becoming global leaders not only in renewable energy generation but also in energy research & development and systems manufacturing. Currently, more than 50% of Germany’s renewable power is generated by community-based projects, and 80% of Denmark’s world-renowned windmills are cooperatively owned. ..."


Clean Technica (http://s.tt/1xJmi)Read more at http://cleantechnica.com/2012/12/28/community-power-renewing-communities-through-renewable-energy/#9BJDEsWlYydVVI10.99

 

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10 Of The Year’s Best Designs For Social Good

10 Of The Year’s Best Designs For Social Good | Yan's Earth | Scoop.it

CYNICS BE DAMNED! FROM AN OVEN THAT TURNS SEAWATER INTO DRINKING WATER, TO A PAIR OF 3-D PRINTED ARMS THAT LET A TODDLER HUG HER MOM FOR THE FIRST TIME, THESE PRODUCTS MADE A POSITIVE CONTRIBUTION TO THOUSANDS OF LIVES THIS YEAR.


Via Susan Davis Cushing
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Susan Davis Cushing's curator insight, December 29, 2012 12:46 PM

More stories like this for 2013!

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New World Record Set for Solar Cells: 44% Efficiency

New World Record Set for Solar Cells: 44% Efficiency | Yan's Earth | Scoop.it
Scientists at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Solar Junction have set a new record for high-efficiency solar cells with an unprecedented 44% efficiency rate.

Via Kalani Kirk Hausman, Digital Sustainability
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Biofuels: fuelling our future with slime and cooking oil

A team of students from Bodmin College in Cornwall make biofuel from algae and waste cooking oil (RT @algaeindustry: A great algae video: RT @asulightworks: Biofuels: fuelling our future with slime and cooking oil via @guardian #biofuel

Via Kalani Kirk Hausman
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Rescooped by Ian Lin from Sustainable imagination
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A Green Arab Documentary from Beirut to Make Arab World Sustainable

A Green Arab Documentary from Beirut to Make Arab World Sustainable | Yan's Earth | Scoop.it
Students from the American University of Beirut have worked with the Forum for Environment and Development to create a documentary on the environmental challenges facing the Arab world The youth of...

Via Laurence Serfaty
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11 Surprising Ways that Your Building Wastes Energy

11 Surprising Ways that Your Building Wastes Energy | Yan's Earth | Scoop.it

If you take a close-up look at your facilities or home,  you'll discover that energy is being wasted in ways you didn't realize


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UtilityTree's curator insight, December 26, 2012 1:54 PM

 

 
Is your home or facility falling prey to one or more of these? Check out our FB page at goo.gl/5H4YE
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Cheap, graphene-based solar cells could be just years away - Awaken Radio

Cheap, graphene-based solar cells could be just years away - Awaken Radio | Yan's Earth | Scoop.it
  Via ExtremeTech Today’s solar cells are usually made out of silicon that is too expensive to be cost-effective for the everyday consumer because highly purified, turned into crystal, then sliced thin...

Via Sass Peress
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Rosamaria's comment, December 27, 2012 9:46 AM
I wonder why graphene products are taking so long. Graphene was conceived by Hans Peter Boheme since 1962 and was manufactured since 2010 by Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov who won the Nobel Price for their experiments with this new wonder material. But I haven't heard about any available graphene product yet.
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Turning algae into biofuel: A one minute method for biocrude

Converting algae to biofuel could be a sustainable solution to the need for liquid fuel in the United States, according to U-M researchers. Scientists in the chemical engineering department are working to create an effective method for converting the plant, which can be harvested continuously and grown in any water condition.

 

Phil Savage (http://che.engin.umich.edu/people/savage.html) is the Arthur F. Thurnau Professor of Chemical Engineering (http://che.engin.umich.edu/) at the University of Michigan. His research focus is on energy production from renewable resources, developing novel processes for converting biomass hydrogen, methane, and liquid transportation fuels.

 

Savage's ocean-going organism of choice is the green marine micro-alga of the genus Nannochloropsis. To make their one-minute biocrude, Savage and Julia Faeth, a doctoral student in Savage's lab, filled a steel pipe connector with 1.5 milliliters of wet algae, capped it and plunged it into 1,100-degree Fahrenheit sand. The small volume ensured that the algae was heated through, but with only a minute to warm up, the algae's temperature should have just grazed the 550-degree mark before the team pulled the reactor back out. Previously, Savage and his team heated the algae for times ranging from 10 to 90 minutes. They saw their best results, with about half of the algae converted to biocrude, after treating it for 10 to 40 minutes at 570 degrees.

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, Rowan Edwards, Kalani Kirk Hausman
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