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10 Things That Learners Pay Attention To (And How to Use Them in eLearning)

10 Things That Learners Pay Attention To (And How to Use Them in eLearning) | www.homeschoolsource.co.uk | Scoop.it

"Even more than other types of education, eLearning must struggle to attract learners' attention: the Internet is full of distractions, and adult learners are both busier and more free to indulge in distractions. Helping students to pay attention is a primary concern of training professionals, so here are some optimal methods to win the attention game in eLearning."


Via Beth Dichter
Audrey's insight:

These are certainly true.  Have a look at www.hotmoodle.com

 

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Mark Treadwell's curator insight, July 27, 2014 3:47 PM

A great list of elements that contribute to a good prompt. Prompts initiate curiosity via the stimulation of the release of hormones that trigger astrocytic cells (75% of all brain cells) in the brain to trigger neurons to map and automate complex neural patterns we call ideas and concepts. MT

Bernard VULLIERME's curator insight, October 20, 2014 5:30 AM

Rien de nouveau sous le soleil du bon e:enseignant, mais plus d'exigences …

clare o'shea's curator insight, February 5, 1:49 PM

and ask indviduals questions every 2-3 minutes - but always label the behaviour first! so it is a positive experience not a catching out!!

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Why is My Teen So Forgetful?

Why is My Teen So Forgetful? | www.homeschoolsource.co.uk | Scoop.it
David Wilcox, of Musings on the Middle Years of Education, and I have worked together to create an infographic about the teen brain. It is based on a blog post he wrote over a year ago (Click here ...

Via Beth Dichter
Audrey's insight:

Thanks for this Beth.  I will add this to my tutorials for students.  It is very helpful, Audrey.  Also have a look at www.hotmoodle.com.

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Cindy Riley Klages's curator insight, December 4, 2013 7:55 AM

Teenagers--gotta love them!

deni tafe library's curator insight, December 4, 2013 4:57 PM

Some relevance for teeenage students

David Baker's curator insight, December 8, 2013 1:01 AM

I plan to share this at the School Accountability meeting I am chairing next week.  We have a standing agenda item - the middle school student.  This is a great resource and in a great format to start conversations at school and home.

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Learning is an exciting adventure starting at Homeschoolsource

Learning is an exciting adventure starting at Homeschoolsource | www.homeschoolsource.co.uk | Scoop.it
Tony Buzan talks about the operations manual for the most important piece of equipment imaginable – the brain.


Homeschoolsource provides resources and materials which can assist a child to access and apply their brains’ immense powers. Parents can learn with their children.
How many adults know how to make their own glowing ectoplasm? Or how to assemble and paint their own planetarium model, highlight it to create the glow effect and charge it with any light source? LET A CHILD SHOW YOU HOW!

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Rescooped by Audrey from Personalize Learning (#plearnchat)
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What Motivates Learners to Want to Learn?

What Motivates Learners to Want to Learn? | www.homeschoolsource.co.uk | Scoop.it
Hear four kids talk about motivation and Kathleen Cushman's information about the conditions for motivation in the webinar and chat.

Via Kathleen McClaskey
Audrey's insight:

It is important to hear from the learners how they are stimulated to absorb information. The earlier this is encouraged the greater the brain power, audrey@homeschoolsource.co.uk

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Kathleen McClaskey's curator insight, January 23, 2014 10:06 AM

Have you ever wondered about motivation and what motivates us to learn? Kathleen Cushman presented in our Personalize Learning Webinar Series on Tues. January 21st by explaining that you start by drawing a straight line between... 


> what young people tell us about their learning experiences; 

> your own practice as educators and; 

> compelling scientific research into mind, brain, and education. 

 

Then she shared the eight simple rules of thumb that help us create the conditions for high motivation and high levels of mastery in the your learning environments!  - See more at: http://www.personalizelearning.com/2014/01/what-motivates-learners-to-want-to-learn.html#sthash.yBN3OEq0.dpuf

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, January 28, 2014 6:07 PM

John Dewey called what motivates people to learn is "living motivation". We bring our stories and autobiographies to learning every day. We want to add to them in ways that help us construct a future of our choosing that fits within a community. It is about constantly transforming who we are.

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Students as Curators of Their Learning Topics

Students as Curators of Their Learning Topics | www.homeschoolsource.co.uk | Scoop.it

Robin Good: Must-read article on ClutterMuseum.com by Leslie M-B, exploring in depth the opportunity to have students master their selected topics by "curating" them, rather than by reading and memorizing facts about them.

 

"Critical and creative thinking should be prioritized over remembering content"

 

"That students should learn to think for themselves may seem like a no-brainer to many readers, but if you look at the textbook packages put out by publishers, you’ll find that the texts and accompanying materials (for both teachers and students) assume students are expected to read and retain content—and then be tested on it.

 

Instead, between middle school (if not earlier) and college graduation, students should practice—if not master—how to question, critique, research, and construct an argument like an historian."

 

This is indeed the critical point. Moving education from an effort to memorize things on which then to be tested, to a collaborative exercise in creating new knowledge and value by pulling and editing together individual pieces of content, resources and tools that allow the explanation/illustration of a topic from a specific viewpoint/for a specific need.

 

And I can't avoid to rejoice and second her next proposition: "What if we shifted the standards’ primary emphasis from content, and not to just the development of traditional skills—basic knowledge recall, document interpretation, research, and essay-writing—but to the cultivation of skills that challenge students to make unconventional connections, skills that are essential for thriving in the 21st century?"

 

What are these skills, you may ask. Here is a good reference where to look them up: http://www.p21.org/storage/documents/P21_Framework_Definitions.pdf (put together by the Partnership for 21st Century Skills)

 

 

Recommended. Good stuff. 9/10

 

Full article: www.cluttermuseum.com/make-students-curators/

 

(Image credit: Behance.net)

 

 


Via Robin Good, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Audrey's insight:

Brilliant.  This is an example of what is known as "flipping" where the student is directed to where information can be found, e.g. Youtube, websites, powerpoint, etc and set critical evaluative questions.

 

Home School Learning is an ideal example of students as curators of their learning. It is essential for children to learn to be in charge of their learning from pre-school in order to develop essential evaluative and critical analytical skills. audrey@homeschoolsource.co.uk.

 

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Education Creations's curator insight, May 12, 2014 12:00 AM

How to turn students into curators.

Sample Student's curator insight, May 5, 10:14 PM

We often ask our students to create annotated bibliographies, and this focuses on their capacity to evaluate and make decisions about the validity, reliability and relevance of sources they have found. using Scoop.it, we can ask them to do much the same thing, but they will publish their ideas for an audience, and will also be able to provide and use peer feedback to enhance and tighten up their thinking. This is relevant to any curriculum area. Of course it is dependent on schools being able to access any social media, but rather than thinking about what is impossible, perhaps we could start thinking about what is possible and lobbying for change.

Sample Student's curator insight, May 5, 10:18 PM

We often ask our students to create annotated bibliographies, and this focuses on their capacity to evaluate and make decisions about the validity, reliability and relevance of sources they have found. Using Scoop.it, we can ask them to do much the same thing. But they will publish their ideas for an audience, and will also be able to provide and use peer feedback to enhance and tighten up their thinking. This is relevant to any age, and any curriculum area. Of course it is dependent on schools being able to access social media. But rather than thinking about what is impossible, perhaps we should start thinking about what is possible, and lobbying for change. Could you use a Scoop.it collection as an assessment task?