WW1 teaching reso...
Follow
Find
1.1K views | +0 today
 
Rescooped by Catherine Smyth from Geography Education
onto WW1 teaching resources
Scoop.it!

Europe’s Landscape Is Still Scarred by World War I

Europe’s Landscape Is Still Scarred by World War I | WW1 teaching resources | Scoop.it
Photographs of the abandoned battlefields reveal the trenches’ scars still run deep

Via Seth Dixon
Catherine Smyth's insight:

A geographical perspective of World War 1.

more...
Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 17, 2014 11:19 AM

Europe's landscape is still scared by World War I. Many photographs are shown in this article of abandoned battlefields that reveal the trenches scars. It has been at least a century since the Great War, yet the country is still buried with scars. In this image by Irish landscape photographer Michael St. Maur Sheil, you can trace grass-covered trenches and pockmarks from exploded bombshells. Millions of men were injured or even killed right in this very spot, which was the first major British offensive of the war. Artists take these photographs to document the legacy that was left on that battlefield. Sheil was very famous for photographs such as these. He includes seventy-nine contemporary photographs of World War I battlefields and has them on display in Paris along the wrought-iron fence of Luxembourg Gardens.

Jacob Conklin's curator insight, February 12, 6:57 PM

People often forget that the world doesn't reset after a major war. World War I was one of the most destructive wars in Europe's long history, not only in terms of human casualties, but also in terms of physical destruction. The heavy use of trench warfare left an everlasting mark on the landscape. Soldiers dug trenches that were miles long and use them for protection from enemy fire. Any observer can see that bullets do not turn corners and that a soldier can hide within the trench and be impervious to gunfire. There is one major weakness in this tactic that explains the dips in the landscape surrounding the trenches. In order to reach the enemy soldiers, bomb and mortar attacks were very effective. The everlasting geographical scaring of the land tells the history of what took place in an area, from wars in Europe to glacial movement in Alaska. The landscape never forgets.

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 28, 10:11 AM

This particular landscape shows trenches and the remains of bombed out fields where one million British soldiers where either killed or wounded by the Germans. I cannot fathom the heartache and loss that these families must have experienced and in some cases still are. How many future leaders or scientists or Nobel Peace Prize winners were killed here? How might the world be a better place but for the butchering of these soldiers? Multiply that though by the hundreds of wars fought throughout civilization. We could be so far advanced as a society, instead we chose and continue to choose wars that contain costs we can't even quantify. I'd like to see cancer cells being destroyed, not people, housing being built instead of propaganda, education instead of anarchy. No more scars, let's build beautiful monuments to society, like peace.

WW1 teaching resources
Resources for the commemoration of the First World War in 2014-2018.  This site provides a range of teaching resources, primary sources, digital content and ideas for how teachers might address this significant historical event in the classroom.
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Catherine Smyth
Scoop.it!

History as commemoration: Professional Development resources

History as commemoration: Professional Development resources | WW1 teaching resources | Scoop.it
Catherine Smyth's insight:

The centenary of the First World War will be commemorated in 2014. What is commemoration? Why is it important to remember and mark this occasion? This resource from the Open University introduces the notion of history as commemoration and provides practical ideas on how to use written texts, letters, memorials and photographs to construct an historical narrative of past events.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Catherine Smyth
Scoop.it!

Gallipoli fatigue: Poor ratings for WWI TV shows, as war weary public switches off

Gallipoli fatigue: Poor ratings for WWI TV shows, as war weary public switches off | WW1 teaching resources | Scoop.it
The commercialisation and politicisation of Gallipoli has caused many Australians to be wary of centenary coverage, one historian says.
Catherine Smyth's insight:

The historian Claire Wright argues, "Anzac-ery" surrounding commemorations has moved Anzac from fact to legend, then myth and that many Australians are suffering from 'Gallipoli' fatigue. She also claims Australia is spending more money on its WW1 commemorations than in any country. If this is true, why?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Catherine Smyth
Scoop.it!

Classroom showcase | Australian War Memorial

Classroom showcase | Australian War Memorial | WW1 teaching resources | Scoop.it
Catherine Smyth's insight:

Beautiful reflections by primary students across the country.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Catherine Smyth
Scoop.it!

Chinese Anzacs

Chinese Anzacs | WW1 teaching resources | Scoop.it
Stories of Chinese Australians who fought during World War I.
Catherine Smyth's insight:

"When World War One was declared, Australia issued a call to arms. The Chinese-Australian community rallied behind the war efforts. Over two hundred Australians of Chinese descent enlisted. One hundred and seven of these were from Victoria. Of those Chinese Australians who fought, forty-one died. No Chinese-Australian nurses who served in the War have been identified to date." (Culture Victoria).

The 'Culture Victoria' website hosts a range of primary and secondary sources for teaching history.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Catherine Smyth
Scoop.it!

Life in the Trenches

Life in the Trenches | WW1 teaching resources | Scoop.it
Catherine Smyth's insight:

The website First World War.com provides a mulitmedia history of World War One.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Catherine Smyth
Scoop.it!

Getting ready for Anzac Day in Australia : a primary school perspective — Medium

Getting ready for Anzac Day in Australia : a primary school perspective — Medium | WW1 teaching resources | Scoop.it
Each year teachers and students in Australian schools prepare for ANZAC DAY. This year will be no different.
Catherine Smyth's insight:

Blogger and educator, Jane Hunter, reflects on how Anzac Day is commemorated in a primary school setting.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Catherine Smyth
Scoop.it!

World War I in the Sydney Mail

World War I in the Sydney Mail | WW1 teaching resources | Scoop.it
Weekly newspaper the Sydney Mail produced some emotive full-colour covers during World War I. This board contains just some of the highlights. We'll add one every day while our exhibition Life Interrupted is on show at the State Library of New South Wales. The Library has digitised all Sydney Mail covers produced during World War I, and you can see them all here: http://acms.sl.nsw.gov.au/album/albumView.aspx?itemID=1064155&acmsid=0
Catherine Smyth's insight:

Interested in how Sydney newspapers reported WW1? Explore the online digital collection of The Sydney Mail on this State Library NSW Pinterest board.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Catherine Smyth
Scoop.it!

In the Style of Ernie Pyle: Reporting on World War II - ReadWriteThink

A lesson ideaStudents will think this lesson should make the headlines when they finish researching Ernie Pyle’s work in preparation for writing their own news articles.

Catherine Smyth's insight:

Although this lesson is aimed at a Year 9 -12 level and focuses on World War II, it could be adapted for learning about WWI and modified for younger students. Developed by a classroom teacher, the lesson provides opportunities for students to work like a journalist and use a range of sources to report on an event.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Catherine Smyth from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Europe’s Landscape Is Still Scarred by World War I

Europe’s Landscape Is Still Scarred by World War I | WW1 teaching resources | Scoop.it
Photographs of the abandoned battlefields reveal the trenches’ scars still run deep

Via Seth Dixon
Catherine Smyth's insight:

A geographical perspective of World War 1.

more...
Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 17, 2014 11:19 AM

Europe's landscape is still scared by World War I. Many photographs are shown in this article of abandoned battlefields that reveal the trenches scars. It has been at least a century since the Great War, yet the country is still buried with scars. In this image by Irish landscape photographer Michael St. Maur Sheil, you can trace grass-covered trenches and pockmarks from exploded bombshells. Millions of men were injured or even killed right in this very spot, which was the first major British offensive of the war. Artists take these photographs to document the legacy that was left on that battlefield. Sheil was very famous for photographs such as these. He includes seventy-nine contemporary photographs of World War I battlefields and has them on display in Paris along the wrought-iron fence of Luxembourg Gardens.

Jacob Conklin's curator insight, February 12, 6:57 PM

People often forget that the world doesn't reset after a major war. World War I was one of the most destructive wars in Europe's long history, not only in terms of human casualties, but also in terms of physical destruction. The heavy use of trench warfare left an everlasting mark on the landscape. Soldiers dug trenches that were miles long and use them for protection from enemy fire. Any observer can see that bullets do not turn corners and that a soldier can hide within the trench and be impervious to gunfire. There is one major weakness in this tactic that explains the dips in the landscape surrounding the trenches. In order to reach the enemy soldiers, bomb and mortar attacks were very effective. The everlasting geographical scaring of the land tells the history of what took place in an area, from wars in Europe to glacial movement in Alaska. The landscape never forgets.

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 28, 10:11 AM

This particular landscape shows trenches and the remains of bombed out fields where one million British soldiers where either killed or wounded by the Germans. I cannot fathom the heartache and loss that these families must have experienced and in some cases still are. How many future leaders or scientists or Nobel Peace Prize winners were killed here? How might the world be a better place but for the butchering of these soldiers? Multiply that though by the hundreds of wars fought throughout civilization. We could be so far advanced as a society, instead we chose and continue to choose wars that contain costs we can't even quantify. I'd like to see cancer cells being destroyed, not people, housing being built instead of propaganda, education instead of anarchy. No more scars, let's build beautiful monuments to society, like peace.

Scooped by Catherine Smyth
Scoop.it!

Australian First WW "slanguage" | Australian War Memorial

Australian First WW "slanguage" | Australian War Memorial | WW1 teaching resources | Scoop.it
Catherine Smyth's insight:

Language is a window into the past. This site discusses how slang, used by soldiers during WW1, not only shaped Australian identify but also acted as an important coping mechanism for those in the trenches.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Catherine Smyth from HSIE K-6 World Achievements by Australians, Past and Present
Scoop.it!

Australians At War

Australians At War | WW1 teaching resources | Scoop.it

Australians at War is  a website designed to complement the Australians at War TV series, and is dedicated to those Australians who served their nation over the past one hundred years.


Via Gabriella Granata, Timothy Joel Dagwell
more...
Gabriella Granata's curator insight, April 20, 2013 1:12 AM

GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE

 

description:

Among all the resources that have been scooped for teachers on this page, Australians at war is the most interactive. This gives students the opportunity to navigate through the experiences Australians had at war through the most up-to-date and recent technology. This website gives students the opportunity to research the Boar war, World war 1, World war 2, the Korean war, South East Asia, Vietnam and peacekeeping. The content is very detailed, and includes a vast amount of information regarding, not only recognised war heros, but details about the events that took place, the weapons used, the significant events and even the women that contributed.

 

The interactive flash website gives students the opportunity to click a war of their preference. In each of the individual websites there is a section titled ‘mates’. Once on this section, the little yellow circle links students to video interviews detailing personal accounts of the war by Australian war survivors.

 

Teaching idea:

Students are paired on one computer. Prior to the activity they are given the link to this website to have the opportunity navigating.

 

The teacher then goes around to allocate each pair a particular war. Students have an instruction sheet that gives them guidance on how to navigate to the mates section and watch videos by war survivers. From these interviews they are given a question sheet that asks for the name of the veteran, interesting facts they learnt about from the war.

 

Assessment task idea/literacy strategy:

Students are asked to use their findings and write an information report detailing the war survivors of their choice.

 

Link to pedagogical research

Expertise in teaching is dependent on flexible access to highly organised systems of knowledge. Technologies have come to the forefront of education discourse due to the range of new requirements for learning. Ultimately, these technologies have changed the nature of the classroom. This knowledge of technology becomes an important aspect of overall teacher knowledge (Mishra and Koehler, 2006).  The need is now to familarise students with websites that are interactive because it has become such a large part of communication in our world. This website is fantastic as it gives an in-depth insight into Australia's history and gives students the information they need through the engaging medium of video interviews. It also gives students the opportunity to take control of their own learning by making their own choices.

 

Word count: 401

Timothy Joel Dagwell's curator insight, April 7, 2014 9:39 AM

During World War II, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill said these famous words, “Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few.” Though the means, and often the ends too, of war are tragic, this quote rings very true for us today who live in the freedom given to us by the  few who have laid down their lives for their nation.

 

This resource is a highly interactive one, which was made to compliment the Australians at War TV series and is dedicated to those who served their nation of the past one hundred years. There is a clear link here, then, between this resource and the subject matter "world achievements by Australians, past and present" of outcome CCS3.1 of the Human Society & its Environment K-6 Syllabus (Board of Studies NSW, 1998, pp. 59-60).

 

When speaking about the nature and purpose of ICT resources, Gilbert and Hoepper (2011, p. 181) argue that though new technologies can make a substantial contribution to teaching and learning, they must be used judiciously and imaginatively if this potential contribution is to be realised. In light of this argument, one idea for the use of this resource is to split students into small groups of approximately two to three students and have each group investigate a different aspect of the content in the resource (e.g. different years, different people, etc.). Then, after the investigation is complete, have the groups form "expert groups" with students from other groups and share what they have learned.

 

References:

Board of Studies NSW (1998). Human Society and its Environment K-6 Syllabus. Retrieved fromhttp://k6.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/go/hsie/

 

Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching society and environment. (4th ed.). South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.

Scooped by Catherine Smyth
Scoop.it!

ANZAC Centenary | The Story of Gallipoli

ANZAC Centenary | The Story of Gallipoli | WW1 teaching resources | Scoop.it
Follow the story of Gallipoli 100 years on, told in four parts - the background to the conflict, an account of the landing, the battles at Lone Pine, the Nek and Chunuk Bair, and the evacuation.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Catherine Smyth
Scoop.it!

Book of Remembrance - The University of Sydney and the Great War

Book of Remembrance - The University of Sydney and the Great War | WW1 teaching resources | Scoop.it
University of Sydney's Book of Remembrance
Catherine Smyth's insight:

Explore this extensive database of biographies and archival information about the University of Sydney's community members who served in the First World War.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Catherine Smyth
Scoop.it!

Anzac Day

Anzac Day | WW1 teaching resources | Scoop.it
As you saw earlier, Anzac day commemorations were held on Friday. And on that day we were lucky enough to meet a young Aussie with a very special connection to it. His name is Anzac. Here's his story. But first, a warning to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers, this story contains images of people who've died.
Catherine Smyth's insight:

Personal stories help young children learn about the past. Use historical narratives in the classroom to humanise significant events like war.


In the book "What is History Teaching?, Chris Husbands describes how 'Storied thinking' is a central tool in the teaching and learning of history. Husbands suggests the teacher's role is to:

  • Provide information
  • Tell stories
  • provide historical context
  • interpret
  • organise resources and students
  • ask questions (ascertain prior knowledge and ideas)
  • perform
  • pose problems (what if? how about? what do you think?)
more...
Catherine Smyth's curator insight, March 23, 6:59 PM

Personal stories help young children learn about the past. Use historical narratives in the classroom to humanise historic events like war.


In the book "What is History Teaching?, Chris Husbands describes how 'Storied thinking' is a central tool in the teaching and learning of history. Husbands suggests the teacher's role is to:

  • Provide information
  • Tell stories
  • provide historical context
  • interpret
  • organise resources and students
  • ask questions (ascertain prior knowledge and ideas)
  • perform
  • pose problems (what if? how about? what do you think?)
Catherine Smyth's curator insight, March 23, 7:00 PM

Personal stories help young children learn about the past. Use historical narratives in the classroom to humanise significant events like war.


In the book "What is History Teaching?, Chris Husbands describes how 'Storied thinking' is a central tool in the teaching and learning of history. Husbands suggests the teacher's role is to:

  • Provide information
  • Tell stories
  • provide historical context
  • interpret
  • organise resources and students
  • ask questions (ascertain prior knowledge and ideas)
  • perform
  • pose problems (what if? how about? what do you think?)
Scooped by Catherine Smyth
Scoop.it!

Gallipoli and the Anzacs | Australians in war | World War 1

Gallipoli and the Anzacs | Australians in war | World War 1 | WW1 teaching resources | Scoop.it
Catherine Smyth's insight:

Developed by the Department of Veteran's Affairs, this website features resources that can be adapted for the primary classroom.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Catherine Smyth
Scoop.it!

WWI Enlistment Posters

WWI Enlistment Posters | WW1 teaching resources | Scoop.it
These posters were displayed in public places around Australia encouraging men to enlist. Prints are available from the Library Shop.
Catherine Smyth's insight:

Interested in how WW1 was advertised? Explore this array of Enlistment posters.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Catherine Smyth
Scoop.it!

How Well Do You Know World War One?

How Well Do You Know World War One? | WW1 teaching resources | Scoop.it
Time for a history test.
Catherine Smyth's insight:

Take this short quiz to assess your background knowledge about WWI.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Catherine Smyth
Scoop.it!

WWI Centenary

WWI Centenary | WW1 teaching resources | Scoop.it
This week marks 100 years since the start of Australia's involvement in the First World War. At the time, very few people realised just how big an impact it would have on our country and the world. But how did it all happen? Here's Matt.
Catherine Smyth's insight:

Useful background information and teaching materials on the commencement of First World War and Australia's involvement in the conflict.

 

more...
intoHistory's curator insight, August 7, 2014 3:45 AM

More than 60,000 Australian boys lost their life on the European battle fields 100 years ago... What a price for a peace that took 20 more years to achieve. Appaling tragedy. Respect, gratitude and humility.

Scooped by Catherine Smyth
Scoop.it!

Personal Diaries from World War 1. Future exhibitions | State Library of New South Wales

Personal Diaries from World War 1. Future exhibitions | State Library of New South Wales | WW1 teaching resources | Scoop.it
Catherine Smyth's insight:

A new exhibition of personal diaries from World War 1.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Catherine Smyth
Scoop.it!

Lest we forget - Schoolhouse Museum

Lest we forget - Schoolhouse Museum | WW1 teaching resources | Scoop.it
Since World War I, North Ryde Public School has had a Memorial Rose Garden. The rose garden has been located in different places within the school grounds over the years and was used as a focus for ANZAC Day services. This photo of the NRPS Red Cross was taken in in the rose garden in1930. …
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Catherine Smyth
Scoop.it!

Keating's 1993 Unknown Soldier speech

Keating's 1993 Unknown Soldier speech | WW1 teaching resources | Scoop.it
Audio of the oration by then Prime Minister Paul Keating at the internment of the Unknown Soldier at the Australian War Memorial in November 1993.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Catherine Smyth
Scoop.it!

ANZAC Day Commemoration Activities

ANZAC Day Commemoration Activities | WW1 teaching resources | Scoop.it
ANZAC is the name given to the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps soldiers who landed on the Gallipoli Peninsula in the East Mediterranean early on the morning of 25 April 1915 during the First World War (1914-1918).
more...
No comment yet.