Writing Tools Web 3.0
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Writing Tools Web 3.0
Learn how techie tools can be used to enhance writing in the classroom
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Citelighter | The fully automated bibliography, research, citation, and internet highlighting tool.

Citelighter | The fully automated bibliography, research, citation, and internet highlighting tool. | Writing Tools Web 3.0 | Scoop.it
Pippa Davies @PippaDavies 's insight:

Citelighter looks like a well structured writing app for helping students in grade 3-12 learn about research writing.  Check out the review here

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Project-Based Learning for the Online Classroom - DE Oracle

Project-Based Learning for the Online Classroom - DE Oracle | Writing Tools Web 3.0 | Scoop.it
Engaging students is a challenge whether teaching online or face-to-face. In online classes that tend to be text-heavy, this task can be especially difficult. One way to overcome this hurdle is to design project-based learning (PBL) assignments.
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The Most Effective Way to Take Notes in Class | Edudemic

The Most Effective Way to Take Notes in Class | Edudemic | Writing Tools Web 3.0 | Scoop.it

“ Notetaking is a skill that students will take with them into their careers. Whether they are in meetings, participating in brainstorming sessions, or making annotations during reading, notes are an effective way of learning, retaining, and recalling ideas and concepts. This article talks about the three best techniques for taking notes in the classroom and how your students can benefit from them.”


Via Miloš Bajčetić, Rosidah Awang, Scott Threlfall
Pippa Davies @PippaDavies 's insight:

Note taking tips for the high school classroom.

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Rosidah Awang's curator insight, February 16, 2015 2:39 AM

Useful techniques on note-taking.

Marisol Espinoza's curator insight, February 21, 7:12 PM

I decided to read this article due to my lack of note taking and how terribly bad I am at it. Usually when I take notes I write everything down that's on the board and I rush to copy it all down and I never listen to what the Professor says and then honestly I never truly go back to my notes after class and if I do I don't even understand half of it because I wasn't even listening. It says in the article that note taking is 75% listening and 25% writing. They gave us 3 different main methods to use in order to note take, the first was the Dynamic Outline where you use color and different symbols. The second method was the Page Split where you split your paper into two and the left side you write the topic and the right you write notes but not into too much detail. And the last method was the Mind Map, it was made up of circles all connecting to each other. It's easier to take notes on topics and subtopics and have them in order. I really enjoyed reading this article because I have such bad note taking I took a lot from this. One thing I believe they tried to much of you to do is short hand, honestly yes shorthand is great, but I can never remember what things are when I go back and look at my notes from shorthand, wish they could have had another method or example for the people that truly don't like using short hand.