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The Art of Fiction: An Interview

The Art of Fiction: An Interview | writing scifi | Scoop.it

A lot of art –– including storytelling –– is about making up stuff! In other words, lying. Beautiful lies, stirring lies. Magnificent lies. But lies nonetheless. Where, I wondered, was anyone trying to figure out what was true?


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Rescooped by Allan Dale Maurer from Science Fiction Future
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Today's Best Science Fiction Writers Imagine How Life Will Be

Today's Best Science Fiction Writers Imagine How Life Will Be | writing scifi | Scoop.it
Science fiction writers explain how life will be in the future.

Via James Keith
Allan Dale Maurer's insight:

On the whole, SF is at least as wrong about any given future as it is right about others. SF stories are thought-experiments as well as fiction - at least the kind I like best are. But's it's main job is not prediction.

 

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trendspotter's curator insight, October 18, 2013 8:48 PM

Amazing collection of sci-fi outlooks.

Cid Alves's curator insight, February 7, 8:30 PM

 E será tão louco daqui a uns 40 anos comparar com a ( ir)realidade :)

Rescooped by Allan Dale Maurer from science fiction, rhetoric and ideology
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Famous Scifi And Fantasy Authors In Their Workspaces

Famous Scifi And Fantasy Authors In Their Workspaces | writing scifi | Scoop.it
It can be a revelation to see an author in the place where he or she invented your favorite fantasy worlds. Out of these humble machines and cluttered studies come alternate realities.

Via Mariusz Leś
Allan Dale Maurer's insight:

Asimov hated natural light and closed the blinds in his office when working. He did use word processors though, unlike Harlan Ellison, who swears by his trusty typewriter (or at least did for the longest time).

 

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Rescooped by Allan Dale Maurer from Transmedia: Storytelling for the Digital Age
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'Wearable' book allows reader to feel emotions of characters

'Wearable' book allows reader to feel emotions of characters | writing scifi | Scoop.it

Via The Digital Rocking Chair
Allan Dale Maurer's insight:

Don't think it will be replacing my Kindle real soon.

 

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Dr. Pamela Rutledge's curator insight, January 30, 10:30 AM

MIT 'wearable' book redefines multisensory media.  Interesting that article doesn't mention how they established the psychology - defining emotions, the physiological reaction of the emotions (or even how they know where the reader is on the page--maybe it's one emotion per page) but it's a stunning peek into the potential of combining technology with storytelling.  It's also another example of the importance of psychology as technology allows us to augment personal experience.  (Might even raise interesting ethical issues of impact of emotional response on different individuals.  Potential as therapeutic device to reset positive emotions.  Would it work in reverse, too?)

Mariale Peñalosa Arguijo's curator insight, January 30, 11:28 AM

add your insight...

 10
Angel Somers's curator insight, February 1, 11:29 AM

I'm not sure If I am ready for this new literacy model.

Rescooped by Allan Dale Maurer from Speculations on Science Fiction
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The Art of Fiction: An Interview

The Art of Fiction: An Interview | writing scifi | Scoop.it

A lot of art –– including storytelling –– is about making up stuff! In other words, lying. Beautiful lies, stirring lies. Magnificent lies. But lies nonetheless. Where, I wondered, was anyone trying to figure out what was true?


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Has 21st Century Science Fiction gone cowardly? Or worse… nostalgic?

Has 21st Century Science Fiction gone cowardly? Or worse… nostalgic? | writing scifi | Scoop.it

Overall, 21st Century SF is heavily warped and crushed under a burden of nostalgia for the past...and anomie toward the future. In "Cowardice, Laziness and Irony: How Science Fiction Lost the Future," Jonathan McCalmont says -- and I agree -- that this dismally destructive and demoralizing trend controls most of the top magazines and most of the Best of the Year anthologies... oh and the awards. McCalmont illuminates how this is not only manifest in the omphaloskeptic (navel-contemplating) short story community of SF but in sub-genres that proclaim themselves to be bold, like Steam Punk and the surge of Skew Cultural science fictional novels (many of which I find admirable) by non-male, non-western or interestingly-origined authors.


Via DBrin
Allan Dale Maurer's insight:

Do you agree with this? It seems overstated to me, meaning, people try to paint an entire genre with a broad brush when what they need is a fine point pen.

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How to Define Science Fiction

How to Define Science Fiction | writing scifi | Scoop.it

Plainly stated: science fiction retains the bold, reality-breaking element of ancient myth-telling, far better than any other genre. But it also rebels against venerable tradition, by portraying change as a protean fluid, sometimes malleable or even good! Violating a core tenet of Aristotle's Poetics, sci fi contemplates the possibility of successfully defying Fate.


Via DBrin
Allan Dale Maurer's insight:

People have been arguing about this in the SF field since its inception.

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MIND MELD: Directions Speculative Fiction Hasn’t Taken - SF Signal

MIND MELD: Directions Speculative Fiction Hasn’t Taken - SF Signal | writing scifi | Scoop.it

Speculative fiction is always experimenting with new writing styles and creating new sub-genres. Some of the newish ones deal with shiny vampires, the inevitbale response to that, and steampunk. But there may be other areas speculative fiction hasn’t explored yet.


Via olsen jay nelson
Allan Dale Maurer's insight:

What's the next scifi subgenre? We have cyberpunk, steampunk, alternative history, alien contact, romance - what's next?

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SF & Fantasy need to stop being so damn eager to please « Damien G. Walter

SF & Fantasy need to stop being so damn eager to please « Damien G. Walter | writing scifi | Scoop.it

“It just seems to me that, from Ballard to Herbert, SF was on a mission to invent and explore unknown fresh new psychologies. It was a fascinating, daunting task. We were on to something- and we lost the nerve to do it.”

There’s nothing less interesting than something which only exists to please you. And sometimes things of this kind aren’t just dull, but radically off putting and even offensive. Because something that only aims to please is by its nature manipulative, maybe even exploitative. It’s only trying to please you because it wants something from you. And if the thing it wants is money. Well that’s the most boring and offensive thing of all.


Via olsen jay nelson
Allan Dale Maurer's insight:

I'm not sure he's reading the same SF I'm reading.

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Predictions From The Father of Science Fiction

Predictions From The Father of Science Fiction | writing scifi | Scoop.it

Hugo Gernsback's predictions give us a look at the most radical of technological utopianism from the 1920s...


Via olsen jay nelson
Allan Dale Maurer's insight:

Hugo was very good at predicting coming tech, from radar to TV to microfilm.

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Allan Dale Maurer's comment, April 1, 2013 2:10 PM
Hugo was quite the meglomaniac, but he made scifi a distinct publishing genre - not something everyone thinks was great. Some call it a ghetto.
Rescooped by Allan Dale Maurer from I want more science fiction
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Speculative versus magical technology in high-tech science fiction

Speculative versus magical technology in high-tech science fiction | writing scifi | Scoop.it

High-tech science fiction is full or ironies and conflicts. One of the more interesting is the scientistic derision of magical technology. At its extreme, it seems to me to be a negation of the terms of high-tech; a set of scientistic limits imposed upon how far high-technism should, as opposed to could, go…


Via olsen jay nelson
Allan Dale Maurer's insight:

So much SF I read these days - especially what is more properly called science fantasy - leaves out overt explanations of the fantastic elements or offers an explanation that is itsefl fantastic. What do you think about that?

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Rescooped by Allan Dale Maurer from I want more science fiction
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Top Ten Rules of Space Opera

Top Ten Rules of Space Opera | writing scifi | Scoop.it

 

Olsen: This is pobably tongue-in-cheek...

 

If you want your space opera to be awesome, you must practice the Rules of Space Opera (not to be confused with The Rules).


Via addkerberos, olsen jay nelson
Allan Dale Maurer's insight:

I'd like to add: no smoking on spaceships. Ain't gonna happen, folks, no matter how big and advanced the damn thing is.

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Why Warp Drives Aren't Just Science Fiction

Why Warp Drives Aren't Just Science Fiction | writing scifi | Scoop.it
How a mirror could create a wormhole, and why FTL starships will need supercomputers.

Via James Keith
Allan Dale Maurer's insight:

I used to write stories like this for the late, lamented OMNI.

 

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How Does Writing Affect Your Brain? [infographic]

Today’s infographic informs us that storytellers have the power to “plant emotions, thoughts, and ideas into the brain of the listener.”

Via Jan Bergmans, Mariusz Leś
Allan Dale Maurer's insight:

We think in stories. More than 100 years of multi-disciplinary research shows that narrative is our primary mode of thought and we turn to other methods (scientific, a blueprint, etc.) for specific purposes.

 

 

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Jan Bergmans's curator insight, July 11, 2013 3:35 AM

 

a new infographic every day

HomeAboutContactSitemapCategories »How Does Writing Affect Your Brain? [infographic]May 26, 2013 |  by Micaela Lacy  |  Education, Health, Mind-Blowing

Most of us write a little something everyday. It might be a grocery list, a poem, or a write-up on the infographic of the day. As we go through this daily ritual, however, we are probably not aware of the effects writing has on our brains.

According to today’s infographic, writing can serve as a calming, meditative tool. Stream of conscious writing exercises, in particular, have been identified as helpful stress coping methods. Keeping a journal, for example, or trying out free-writing exercises, can drastically reduce your levels of stress.

It should also be noted that writing can hold a powerful influence over its readers. Today’s infographic informs us that storytellers have the power to “plant emotions, thoughts, and ideas into the brain of the listener.” But all of these mind-shaping tools can be completely disregarded if one chooses to insert a cliché into his or her writing. When you hear phrases like “love is blind” or “dumb blonde,” your brain skips over these ideas and simply accepts them as a collection of words. Clichés have become so familiar to us that the sensory responses they are supposed to evoke are often severely diluted.

So, whether you’re trying to de-stress, or improve your writing, check out the infographic below for some helpful insight into the goings-on of your brain. I hope you never stop writing! [Via]

Sayeed Mohiuddin's curator insight, August 1, 2013 4:48 AM

The more you write the better you remember!

Mariana Soffer's curator insight, August 1, 2013 11:22 PM

Most of us write a little something everyday. It might be a grocery list, a poem, or a write-up on the infographic of the day. As we go through this daily ritual, however, we are probably not aware of the effects writing has on our brains.

According to today’s infographic, writing can serve as a calming, meditative tool. Stream of conscious writing exercises, in particular, have been identified as helpful stress coping methods. Keeping a journal, for example, or trying out free-writing exercises, can drastically reduce your levels of stress.

Rescooped by Allan Dale Maurer from Metaglossia: The Translation World
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A New Translation of The One Russian Science Fiction Novel You Absolutely Must Read

A New Translation of The One Russian Science Fiction Novel You Absolutely Must Read | writing scifi | Scoop.it

The great Russian science fiction author Boris Strugatsky died today in Saint Petersburg at 79. He and his brother Arkady (who died in 1991) wrote some of the most iconic works of Soviet science fiction.


Via Charles Tiayon
Allan Dale Maurer's insight:

Roadside Picnic was made into the film "Stalker," which in turn, inspired a recent book length essay. This translation restores cuts made by Soviet era censors. How come we see so little SF coming out of Russia now?

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Allan Dale Maurer's comment, April 1, 2013 2:30 PM
Roadside Picnic (aka "Stalker") was censored when originally published in the Soviet Union. This translation restores the cuts. The film version "Stalker," inspired a recent book length essay, although it has far fewer SF elements than the book.
Rescooped by Allan Dale Maurer from Speculations on Science Fiction
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A Long, Lonely Road: Some Informal Advice to New Authors

A Long, Lonely Road: Some Informal Advice to New Authors | writing scifi | Scoop.it

Writing is a worthy calling -- one that can, at times, achieve great heights taht ennoblet he human race. Actually, I believe writing was the first truly verifiable and effective form of magic. Think of how it must have impressed people in ancient times! Author David Brin offers suggestions to set new authors on the path toward writing...


Via DBrin
Allan Dale Maurer's insight:

Brin knows his stuff, both about writing and about science. 

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Rescooped by Allan Dale Maurer from Speculations on Science Fiction
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Could Our Universe Be a Fake?

Could Our Universe Be a Fake? | writing scifi | Scoop.it

although it might be called a form of lying, most societies have highly valued storytelling. In my role as a novelist, I join this tradition by stringing together lengthy chains of coded squiggles—in the Roman alphabet—that highly skilled readers later deconvolute and transform into stirring mental images, rollicking action, empathy with imagined characters, and even (possibly) an insight or two. Motion pictures shortcut and amplify this process with a firehose stream of visual images, cues and crutches that cater to the same human genius—a knack for picturing things, people and events that never (objectively) existed. 
If “magic” is the creation of subjective realities in the minds of other peoples, then we moderns have learned how to perform magical incantations on a vast, industrial scale.


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Supernatural Collective Nouns

Supernatural Collective Nouns | writing scifi | Scoop.it
RT @cavanscott: Collective nouns of fantasy creatures http://t.co/lvm4Kf2hqH
Allan Dale Maurer's insight:

Words are our tools.

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Predicting the future versus deconstructing the present in science fiction: reflecting on William Gibson | sfauthoralliance.com

Predicting the future versus deconstructing the present in science fiction: reflecting on William Gibson | sfauthoralliance.com | writing scifi | Scoop.it

I’ve never really been interested in predicting the future in science fiction, and haven’t found a compelling need for it in future-based SF; taking this approach, I nevertheless found myself feeling nervous when I wrote my second novel because of this very issue regarding prediction. Throughout, I never thought that the novel was about prediction, but I thought that there would be readers who would want it to be … and worse, be in accordance with their ideas about plausible futures in order for them to suspend disbelief and allow themselves to arrive at and have a chance of accepting the actual narrative themes explored.

 

I read an interview with William Gibson in an article on Wired recently, in which he mentioned this problem:

 

"There’s really a lot of that in the futurology game, and everybody who markets any kind of futurological product — be it some kind of corporate advising or a given science fiction writer, has a real vested interest in making their product seem prescient. If I were a total cynical bullshitter, I’d go around trying to make everybody think that I knew what the future was going to be too. But I’ve never really seen the predictive part as being what I really do."


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Sci-Fi’s Best Time-Travel Trop… | AW WebBiz & Social Media Blog

Sci-Fi’s Best Time-Travel Trop… | AW WebBiz & Social Media Blog | writing scifi | Scoop.it

Sci-Fi's Best Time-Travel Tropes, From Fixing the Past to Unreal Time Machines: http://t.co/S4e0bIDK...


Via olsen jay nelson
Allan Dale Maurer's insight:

For your idea box.

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10 Tips for Generating Killer Science Fiction Story Ideas

10 Tips for Generating Killer Science Fiction Story Ideas | writing scifi | Scoop.it
Science fiction is the literature of big ideas — so coming up with an amazing story idea often feels like the biggest stumbling block in the way of your dreams of authorship.

Via olsen jay nelson
Allan Dale Maurer's insight:

Finding ideas is great, but actually writing the stories is the hard part.

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Worldbuilding - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Worldbuilding - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia | writing scifi | Scoop.it

Worldbuilding is the process of constructing an imaginary world, sometimes associated with a whole fictional universe.[1] The resulting world may be called a constructed world or a conworld.[2][better source needed] The term "worldbuilding" was popularized at science fiction writers' workshops in the 1970s. Developing an imaginary setting with coherent qualities such as a history, geography, and ecology is a key task for many science fiction or fantasy writers.[3] Worldbuilding often involves the creation of maps, a backstory, and people for the world. Constructed worlds can enrich the backstory and history of fictional works, and it is not uncommon for authors to revise their constructed worlds while completing its associated work. Constructed worlds can be created for personal amusement and mental exercise, or for specific creative endeavors such as novels, video games, or role-playing games.


Via olsen jay nelson
Allan Dale Maurer's insight:

Some of the best hard sf still relies on worldbuilding techniques. A couple of anthologies by Reginald Brentnor included entries from the likes of Poul Anderson and Hal Clement on this topic (still worth hunting down - better info than whole books on writing scifi).

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