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How to Write the Perfect First Page, Part 1 | Writing Rightly

How to Write the Perfect First Page, Part 1 | Writing Rightly | Writing mag | Scoop.it
Agents and readers alike make snap decisions based on the first page, so you better make it good!

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Mick D Kirkov's comment, April 27, 6:23 AM
Great Work, Penelope! Looking forward for Part 2. Thank you!
A.K.Andrew's curator insight, April 27, 11:23 AM

How many of you spend  hours on your first page.? We can always use a little help.

Jacques Goyette's curator insight, April 27, 8:45 PM

Yes, catching the reader's attention on the very first pages is primordial !

 

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Terms Used on This Site - Writingeekery

Terms Used on This Site - Writingeekery | Writing mag | Scoop.it

You can read through this page if you want, but it isn’t meant to be a vocab list. It’s just a resource to clarify a word’s meaning when you’re confused. A vocab list is boring, dry, and doesn’t help learning. Learning is easiest when it’s interesting and meaningful.


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Penelope's curator insight, April 2, 5:40 PM

 

Hail all aspiring writers!

 

Ye olde writing jargon we toss about so freely is forthwith broken down into its most humble beginnings. Immersion in a craft for years upon years may contribute to the dreaded "expert" speak.

 

Really, we don't mean to act high and mighty. Please forgive us. Read and extract some exciting yet befuddling words; go forth now and use them with confidence.

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article: http://www.writingeekery.com/glossary/

 

 

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Story First, Writing Second – Especially Come November | Writing Rightly

Story First, Writing Second – Especially Come November | Writing Rightly | Writing mag | Scoop.it

I spent the morning working with a very talented writer. An extremely well-placed agent had recently rejected her manuscript, but told her that he’d be happy to consider a revision, or anything else...


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Penelope's curator insight, March 14, 10:42 AM

 

Do you write stories and become lost meandering down an aimless path to nowhere? If you are lost, so is your reader. All of us have been there, done that. The secret is to figure out how to jump back on the great story path--so our readers want more!

 

This writer suggests we must first begin our story not by plotting, or furiously writing by the seat of our pants--but by knowing our protagonist all the way to his/her inner core.

 

From the article: "The protagonist’s internal misbelief must already exist before the plot kicks into action. Every protagonist must enter already wanting something very badly, and with an inner issue – fear, fatal flaw, wound, misbelief – that keeps her from getting it. You must know these before you start to write because they define what the story will be about."

 

 “The end of our exploring will be to arrive at where we started, and to know the place for the first time.” – T.S. Eliot

 

 “The only real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new landscapes but in having new eyes.” — Proust

 

Think about that for a minute. Feel it. Story is about an inner change.

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article: http://writerunboxed.com/2013/10/10/story-first-writing-second-especially-come-november/

♥ princess leia ♥'s curator insight, March 15, 9:27 AM

Everyone has a story!

Jacques Goyette's curator insight, March 15, 5:46 PM

Great article Penelope ! Congrats !

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Online Writing with Clarity Infographic - Business 2 Community

Online Writing with Clarity Infographic - Business 2 Community | Writing mag | Scoop.it

Online writing may include blogging, marketing copy, website or newsletter content and they all share the need for clarity.  One of the first things we learn about writing online is we have seconds to capture a reader and their attention span is short. Clear, concise writing wasn’t invented online, however, it has always been taught to writers as a best practice.  Long before the Internet, George Orwell said, “If it is possible to cut a word out, always cut it out."....


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Penelope's comment, February 13, 4:17 PM
We always need the reminder to KISS!
aanve's curator insight, February 13, 10:23 PM

www.aanve.com

 

Mana Huart's curator insight, February 14, 2:12 AM

C'est si simple…

Rescooped by Mick D Kirkov from EBook Promotion and Marketing
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A Secret Site Chock-Full of Hungry Readers Begging to be Fed! - PHILOSBOOKS

A Secret Site Chock-Full of Hungry Readers Begging to be Fed! - PHILOSBOOKS | Writing mag | Scoop.it
Wattpad is a site full of 24 Million Readers!

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Penelope's curator insight, January 24, 7:14 PM

 

I'm giving Wattpad more than a passing glance after listening in on a webinar with their Head of Content Publishing. This site is overlooked by authors--but readers are another story.

 

It's great for self-publishers, but If you are looking for a traditional publishing contract, you can collect raw data of your readers' tastes. You can then share with a prospective publisher. New authors have been discovered and promoted to celebrity status on the site.

 

A few other interesting tidbits?

 

o 80% of readers are on mobile phones and tablets

o An older demographic - 40% in the 18-30 age group

o If you write YA, there are a core group of teens on the site

 

You may even run into Margaret Atwood or a few other famous authors! Check out the article for the inside scoop on 45+ more tips and tricks so you can make an educated choice. To share or not to share?

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Ebook Promotion and Marketing"***

 

Link to the original article: http://philosbooks.com/wattpad/

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What Killed It For Me #4: Clichéd Characters - WRITERS HELPING WRITERS

What Killed It For Me #4: Clichéd Characters - WRITERS HELPING WRITERS | Writing mag | Scoop.it

It’s hard to come up with characters who are believable yet don’t sound like every other character out there. It’s especially easy to fall into this trap with certain archetypes, like witty sidekicks or wise old mentors.


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Penelope's curator insight, April 11, 4:04 PM

 

Character creation within a novel can be a most arduous task, in my humble opinion. Maybe you have a great gal or guy in mind as you begin, but it can tax the patience of even the most experienced novelist to mold and shape them into fully fleshed out people.

 

If your characters are in need of some life resuscitation, this article could be the life preserver you need to throw your Dick or Jane stick figure, so they don't drown the story.

 

Explore the character's back story and come up with some unique flaws that are not clichéd. Explore the positive side of traits, and vice versa. Don't forget quirks and add an inner goal. The excellent article gives you the steps to get it done.

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article:  http://writershelpingwriters.net/2014/04/killed-4-cliched-characters/

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James Scott Bell: The "Write From The Middle" Method - WRITERS HELPING WRITERS

James Scott Bell: The "Write From The Middle" Method - WRITERS HELPING WRITERS | Writing mag | Scoop.it
Today we’re welcoming bestselling author and brilliant writing coach James Scott Bell to Writers Helping Writers. James has created a unique writing method that solves the “plotter or pantser” dilemma when it comes to structuring a novel, so please read … Continue reading →

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Penelope's curator insight, March 24, 4:16 PM

 

The writing method debate has heated up. Plotters and pantsers now have a new sparring partner: Tweeners.

 

The brilliant writing coach, James Scott Bell, has written a new book which promptly downloaded itself onto my Kindle. He contends we should not concern ourselves whatsoever about plotting or pantsing, but instead write our novel from the middle.

 

This from a man who has studied plot and structure for over twenty-five years. He written perhaps fifty novels, and immersed himself in all methods of writing.

 

Bell says we should begin at the "mirror moment" of the novel. A place somewhere in the  middle. A place where the character has their defining moment, questioning who they are, what they doing, and why they are doing it. It's the heart of a novel, and where we will impress readers, editors and agents alike.

 

He tells us that even if we love our pantsing and plotting, the "WFTMM" will enhance our writing that much more. Intriguing.

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article: http://writershelpingwriters.net/2014/03/james-scott-bell-write-middle-method/comment-page-2/#comment-55548

Christi Krug's curator insight, March 24, 8:46 PM

You've got your plotters, and you've got your pantsers (writing by the seat of their pants), and here's yet another option, writing from the middle.

 

But I daresay there are many, many more ways to write a novel and you won't know the best way for *you* until you experiment. And experiment. And experiment.

Mick D Kirkov's comment, April 3, 12:51 AM
@Christy Absolutely right. As Gorby (went forgotten last times, in vain) loved to say: "Once started, the thing will develop and go for itself. It has its own dynamism."
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8 Reasons Guys Who Read Make the Best Boyfriends

8 Reasons Guys Who Read Make the Best Boyfriends | Writing mag | Scoop.it

Bookwormy guys are my kryptonite.

 

Truly, though, what he reads matters less than the fact that he does. Here are 8 reasons why.


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6 Must-Know Tricks for Getting to Know Your Characters - Helping Writers Become Authors

6 Must-Know Tricks for Getting to Know Your Characters - Helping Writers Become Authors | Writing mag | Scoop.it

"Many a poor plot has been forgiven thanks to its amazing characters. Dynamic, realistic, relatable characters pull readers in, open their eyes, and steal their hearts. Most of us don’t start writing until we’ve come up with a character we just adore."


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Penelope's curator insight, January 29, 8:50 PM

 

Have you ever read a book or watched a movie and thought, "I didn't know that person at all. I wish I knew more about them." You feel cheated.

 

Well, if you're writing a book, this post is for you. How do we make sure we create fully fleshed out characters who will carry the reader from opener to power packed ending?

 

According to K.M. Weiland, there are six ways to truly get to know your characters.

 

1)  Conception: Listen (let your subconcious be your guide)

2)  Casting: Search (who would play them in a movie?)

3)  General Sketches: Organize

     (write down everything you know about the story)

4)  Character Interview: Analyze (interview all characters)

5)  Outline: Discover (pay attention to the craft and discover)

6.) First Draft: Let Go (write and be open to change)

 

I'm finding that as I am writing my first romance novel, it is taking on a completely different shape. The characters are evolving, along with the plot. What an exciting journey it is to write a novel!

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article:  http://www.helpingwritersbecomeauthors.com/2013/08/get-to-know-your-characters.html

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Break Out of that Writing Rut: Tell-Don't Show-and Write More of What You Love! via PHILOSBOOKS

Break Out of that Writing Rut: Tell-Don't Show-and Write More of What You Love!  via PHILOSBOOKS | Writing mag | Scoop.it

Writing is hard work. You are faced with a blank sheet of paper. Don't let this stop you.


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Mick D Kirkov's comment, April 2, 9:14 PM
Perhaps love, as you wrote and they sing https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mGIfE9uhxSE - will port you out of the sick mood. As to my "stopping", old love doesn't rust, explains.
Ali Anani's curator insight, April 29, 11:11 PM

love writing what you love

♥ princess leia ♥'s curator insight, May 6, 2:45 PM

Writing is love