Writing
21 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Laura Laframboise Jennison
Scoop.it!

24 Quotes That Will Inspire You To Write More

24 Quotes That Will Inspire You To Write More | Writing | Scoop.it
From J.K. Rowling, Ray Bradbury, Maya Angelou, and a bunch of other people who know what they're talking about. NaNoWriMo, anyone?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Laura Laframboise Jennison
Scoop.it!

Is It Plot?

Is It Plot? | Writing | Scoop.it
New storytellers often have trouble telling the difference between “things happening” and “a story unfolding.” Without the ability to turn events into plots, there is no story, and audience will quickly become bored and spend ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Laura Laframboise Jennison
Scoop.it!

The 22 rules of storytelling, according to Pixar

The 22 rules of storytelling, according to Pixar | Writing | Scoop.it
On Twitter, Pixar storyboard artist Emma Coats has compiled nuggets of narrative wisdom she's received working for the animation studio over the years. It's some sage stuff, although there's nothing here about defending yourself from your childhood toys when they inevitably come to life with murder in their hearts. A truly glaring omission.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Laura Laframboise Jennison
Scoop.it!

Confidence in Writing - Quotes to Build Yours | Now Novel

Confidence in Writing - Quotes to Build Yours | Now Novel | Writing | Scoop.it
Confidence in writing is something many writers struggle with. Read these 21 quotes to find extra motivation to finish writing a novel.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Laura Laframboise Jennison
Scoop.it!

Writing Dialogue - 7 Tips | Now Novel

Writing Dialogue - 7 Tips | Now Novel | Writing | Scoop.it
Writing dialogue is an important skill to master if you want to immerse readers in your fictional world and story characters. Follow these 7 tips.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Laura Laframboise Jennison
Scoop.it!

32 Most Useful Free Tools for A Better Online Writing Experience

32 Most Useful Free Tools for A Better Online Writing Experience | Writing | Scoop.it
Storytelling has always been a significant part life. Digital media now combines tradition with technology and allows you to tell stories through voice, text,
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Laura Laframboise Jennison
Scoop.it!

How to Plan, Write, and Develop a Book: Book Titles--How Important Are They? How Do You Get a Great One?

How to Plan, Write, and Develop a Book: Book Titles--How Important Are They? How Do You Get a Great One? | Writing | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Laura Laframboise Jennison from The Funnily Enough
Scoop.it!

Go On! Make a Bad Decision! Your Story Will Thank You

Go On! Make a Bad Decision! Your Story Will Thank You | Writing | Scoop.it
Still life.  A painting term for something captured in time.  Frozen, unmoving, maybe even perfect.  Looks pretty.  Gets a little boring after a while.  Is far from real life, isn't it?


Still life never makes a good story.

Bad decisions? They do.

Via mooderino
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Laura Laframboise Jennison from The Funnily Enough
Scoop.it!

Stronger Emotions Through Melodrama

Stronger Emotions Through Melodrama | Writing | Scoop.it
Melodrama makes people think of bad soap operas. In fact, melodrama is about emphasising the emotional aspect of a story, but when you do that you can very easily tip over into hysterical characters who overreact to every little thing.

It’s a bit like overacting in a movie; a big performance can be enthralling if done right, and ridiculous if pushed too far. Melodramatic stories suffer a similar problem, although, like bad acting, they can still be entertaining when preposterous.

However, emotions are important in all stories. You want the reader to feel connected to the character and to empathise with their plight. And there are a number of techniques used in melodrama that can be applied (in moderation) to your story and help those feels reach your readers.

Via mooderino
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Laura Laframboise Jennison
Scoop.it!

On Fairy Tales, Comfort Books, Raising Readers, & More: Reading Rainbow Interviews Neil Gaiman! - Reading Rainbow

On Fairy Tales, Comfort Books, Raising Readers, & More: Reading Rainbow Interviews Neil Gaiman! - Reading Rainbow | Writing | Scoop.it
(As the author of hundreds of books across multiple genres and age ranges, Neil Gaiman needs no introduction. His appeal transcends age and defies labels. When I told my family that I’d be interviewing Neil the excitement was universal, from my youngest princess-feminist daughter to my head-in-the-clouds teen to my 40-something Sci-Fi loving husband. It is precisely because of this universal appeal that we avid readers–and reading advocates–owe so much to Mr. Gaiman. His diverse, accessible, and utterly riveting works have been the tools of ensorcellment which have brought countless non-readers into the book-loving fold. Here at Reading Rainbow, this is exactly our mission: to inspire kids not just to read for school or for their parents, but inspire them to love books, and to read for themselves. In this mission Neil Gaiman is an invaluable advocate. Whether you’re a child first discovering the written word, or a jaded and curmudgeonly bibliophobe, one story from the King of Dreams is sure to convert you to word-worshipping. For this, Mr. Gaiman, we thank you.  —Jenni) At Reading Rainbow our mission is to encourage kids to love reading, and through books believe they can “Go Anywhere, Be Anything,” so I want to start off by asking how you got your start as a reader. You’ve mentioned in other interviews that you were an avid reader, can you remember how you came to a love of reading? Which events or books encouraged you down that path? Honestly, I don’t remember a time when I didn’t love reading. I do think it’s fortunate that I had parents who thought I should be taught how to use a library, who would order books for me, and the arrival of those books would become a big special event. My mother would let us choose which books we wanted to read and then she would order them for us. I remember getting books such as The Song of Hiawatha. My mother loved reading me poetry and song lyrics at night. When I was very young there was an English author (who is now looked down on a bit) named Enid Blyton, who may well have been the best selling kids’ author of the 20th century in England. She tended to write stories aimed at certain age groups. The first books I remember were her Noddy books, about Noddy and a gnome called Big-Ears driving around in his little car. I remember shortly after those books you could graduate to more impressive Blyton books—which I did—with gnomes and elves, books like The Wishing Chair series and the Faraway Tree series. I can still remember seeing those books sitting on the bottom shelves and pulling them out to read. When I was six I discovered C.S. Lewis, and at that point I was lost. Two authors I discovered in my sixth year who I still love and respect are C.S. Lewis and P.L. Travers [the author of the Mary Poppins books.] I had seen the Mary Poppins Disney movie when I was about three and loved it. I remember later seeing the book with a still from the film on the cover and I talked my parents into buying it for me. On the one hand it was very strange how different the books and film had been, and I had a sneaking suspicion that while I missed Julie Andrews, the books were better; deeper, more powerful. I loved the way Travers told stories. I loved that she didn’t explain things. She left things unexplained for the reader to figure out. Have you passed your love of reading on to your own kids? They are avid readers. Although interestingly, my oldest son Mike didn’t become a reader until I had almost given up on him becoming one. He was around 11 or 12 and I thought I had failed. I used to read to him every night, but he just wasn’t interested in picking up a book and reading for himself until one year I took Mike with me to a convention where he met Kevin Anderson [author of the Jedi Academy trilogy and other Star Wars spin-off novels.] Kevin sent my son Mike one of his Star Wars novels and at that point Mike was hooked. He became an avid reader, and while I was always a proud father, I became an even prouder father. My two daughters, Holly and Maddy, are avid readers and always have been. In fact, I remember the day—I felt happy and sad at the same time—when Maddy was 12 or so; I had read to her every night since she was about two, it was our thing, and on this particular night we were halfway through Philip Pullman’s The Golden Compass and she said, “I think I’ll finish it on my own, Dad.” As a parent, do you try to encourage your kids to be avid readers? How so? Other than reading to them every night, I just made sure the books were there for them to discover. I think the most important thing I did to raise kids who love reading was to surround them with books. Also being a reader myself. It is a really good thing to be an adult and to let kids see you reading. When kids see you reading they want to read. They think it’s cool. There were, however, definitely things I did wrong. Things I did slightly wrong and things I did appallingly wrong. My wrongest thing was with Holly: When she was 11 or 12 Holly came home from school clutching a Goosebumps book by R.L. Stine. She loved the Goosebumps books. I did what I thought was the correct thing, and said “if you like these then you’ll love this…” and I went and got a copy of Stephen King’s Carrie for her. Well, she didn’t like it, not at all. And that was it for Holly and horror. After that she tended to read books with happy people on prairies. All of your books, whether they’re shelved …
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Laura Laframboise Jennison
Scoop.it!

Neil Gaiman: Why Disney's Sleeping Beauty doesn't work - Telegraph

Neil Gaiman: Why Disney's Sleeping Beauty doesn't work - Telegraph | Writing | Scoop.it
Neil Gaiman tells Gaby Wood that every fairy tale is a loaded gun
Laura Laframboise Jennison's insight:

Interesting view of fairy tales and their roles.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Laura Laframboise Jennison from The Funnily Enough
Scoop.it!

Outlining: Why I Made the Switch and Tips for Trying It

Outlining: Why I Made the Switch and Tips for Trying It | Writing | Scoop.it
I was a mystery writing pantster. I was rather proud of it.

This approach worked enormously well for me. Until, one day, it didn’t.

I was on a deadline and realized the book had several huge plot holes that I’d not seen until close to the end. I pulled some all-nighters and initiated a writing schedule that made NaNoWriMo look tame. I hit my deadline, but it was enough to shake me up. It shook me out of my complacency.

Via mooderino
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Laura Laframboise Jennison
Scoop.it!

The One-Two Punch Writing Tip That Finally Got Me Writing

The One-Two Punch Writing Tip That Finally Got Me Writing | Writing | Scoop.it
Writer's block is about fear. So this two-pronged psychological hack for writers neutralizes writing-angst before it starts so you can get to writing.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Laura Laframboise Jennison
Scoop.it!

7 Qualities Found in a Formidable Antagonist

7 Qualities Found in a Formidable Antagonist | Writing | Scoop.it
Today I want to talk about a subject that I haven’t really addressed much before: Bad Guys. And there’s a reason for that, because for a long time, I struggled with creating good antagonists for my stories. They were weak, and weak villains make for weak plots. It’s not easy to write a gripping novel […]
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Laura Laframboise Jennison from Young Adult Books
Scoop.it!

Fight back! Why we need angry girls in YA

Fight back! Why we need angry girls in YA | Writing | Scoop.it
Real young adults need to see fictional ones self-destructing or fighting back because it’s ok to be angry, says CJ Skuse, who admires girl power at its rawest and finest in fiction
There’s an angry girl in all my books.

Via Eric Bateman
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Laura Laframboise Jennison
Scoop.it!

Joseph Campbell's Mythology | Now Novel

Joseph Campbell's mythology shows writers tried and trusted story structures that satisfy readers. Read more about Campbell's story structure ideas.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Laura Laframboise Jennison
Scoop.it!

Writing Contest: Wanderlust

Writing Contest: Wanderlust | Writing | Scoop.it
Inkitt's free Fantasy Writing Contest is open for submissions. Old and New stories of any length
Laura Laframboise Jennison's insight:

Fantasy Writing Contest. No entrance fee. All rights remain with authors. Winners receive badges for their websites. Is that enough incentive?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Laura Laframboise Jennison
Scoop.it!

11 Ways to Inspire Readers and Writers | Feed Your Need To Read

11 Ways to Inspire Readers and Writers | Feed Your Need To Read | Writing | Scoop.it
Need a little inspiration boost going through a book? Let the words of these famous authors and their works guide you.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Laura Laframboise Jennison
Scoop.it!

10 Great Quotes About Writing ⋆ Miles & Company

10 Great Quotes About Writing ⋆ Miles & Company | Writing | Scoop.it
My wife and children left me… temporarily. For the next five days, I’ll be a giant can of Fun-Be-Gone® Spray. I’m sequestering myself to finish the second book. It’s at 86,000 words and counting.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Laura Laframboise Jennison from The Funnily Enough
Scoop.it!

Five Ways To Make Your Reader Care

Five Ways To Make Your Reader Care | Writing | Scoop.it

I have found my new all-time, favourite writing advice:

 

'The bigger the issue, the smaller you write. Remember that. You don't write about the horrors of war. No. You write about a kid's burnt socks lying on the road. You pick the smallest manageable part of the big thing, and you work off the resonance.' ~Richard Price


Via mooderino
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Laura Laframboise Jennison from The Funnily Enough
Scoop.it!

The WHY behind Why You're Not Writing

The WHY behind Why You're Not Writing | Writing | Scoop.it

Sometimes after people learn I’m a writer, they confess to me in private they have a book inside them. They dream about it and long to make that happen.

 

I know others who talk a lot about writing. They post writerly quotes on social media, links to publishing articles and always know the latest industry buzz. Another set are voracious readers; they can discuss a variety of cool topics or brainstorm story ideas. They love the whole literary scene.

 

What all these folks share in common is…

 

They’re not writing.


Via mooderino
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Laura Laframboise Jennison from The Funnily Enough
Scoop.it!

The Secret of Getting Your Writing Unstuck

The Secret of Getting Your Writing Unstuck | Writing | Scoop.it
Whenever I get stuck writing, whether it be in the pre-writing stage or in the middle of a draft, my go-to tool for getting unstuck is the free write. Take a look at how you too can use free writing to get your writing unstuck!

Via mooderino
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Laura Laframboise Jennison
Scoop.it!

How to Format a Manuscript - The Specifics Guidelines You Need | WritersDigest.com

How to Format a Manuscript - The Specifics Guidelines You Need | WritersDigest.com | Writing | Scoop.it
Before sending your novel out to potential agents and publishers, be sure it's sent in the standard manuscript format by following these guidelines.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Laura Laframboise Jennison from The Funnily Enough
Scoop.it!

What Makes Your Characters Uncomfortable?

What Makes Your Characters Uncomfortable? | Writing | Scoop.it
Everyone has their hot buttons topics--the ones that get their blood boiling, or makes their skin crawl, or triggers an inappropriate response to the situation. While this isn't much fun to encounter in real life, it's a great way to create conflict and tension in a novel. Pushing someone's hot button (either accidentally or on purpose) can cause a character to act in ways they otherwise wouldn't.

Via mooderino
more...
No comment yet.