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tips, tools, advice and inspiration for writing fiction and nonfiction
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10 TED Talks from authors

10 TED Talks from authors | writing | Scoop.it
These well-known writers weave beautiful words on the page … and on the stage.
KindredReaders's insight:

There goes my evening ...

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A.K.Andrew's curator insight, October 23, 4:21 PM

Always great to hear things directly from authors themselves.

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Writing Hints: Attributives, Modifiers, Scenes and Looking in the Mirror | Christopher Moore


Via Laura Brown
KindredReaders's insight:

I love, Love, LOVE Chris Moore's work. In this short piece he channels Elmore Leonard on writing dialogue (among other things).

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Sympathetic Doesn't Have To Mean Likable


Via mooderino
KindredReaders's insight:

Check out the entire series on Sympathetic Characters here: http://moodywriting.blogspot.co.uk/2013/01/forcing-readers-to-like-characters.html Although I don't agree with everything, there's plenty of tasty goodness in each post.

 

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César Cortés Vega's curator insight, July 5, 9:41 AM

Identificación, simpatía con la representación

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Script Tip: Pets in Movies - How Can a Pet Improve Your Characters and Plot? - Script Magazine

Script Tip: Pets in Movies - How Can a Pet Improve Your Characters and Plot? - Script Magazine | writing | Scoop.it

What does it say about a person when they own a cat or dog? 

KindredReaders's insight:

What is it, Lassie? What are you trying to tell us, girl? Is it something about Timmy? Some insight into him as a person? 

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Writing Advice Database | Nathan Bransford, Author

Writing Advice Database | Nathan Bransford, Author | writing | Scoop.it
Check out this blog post by Nathan Bransford, the author of How to Write a Novel and the Jacob Wonderbar series
KindredReaders's insight:

The always helpful (and funny) former agent/now writer Nathan Bransford has just updated his Writing Advice Database. Awesome resource! 

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5 Writing Tips from Lorrie Moore

5 Writing Tips from Lorrie Moore | writing | Scoop.it

Lorrie Moore offers insight on the craft of writing.

KindredReaders's insight:

"Write from the center" resonated with me.

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See Your Book Idea Through the Lens of a Publishing Professional

See Your Book Idea Through the Lens of a Publishing Professional | writing | Scoop.it

If you take a business orientated view of the publishing and marketing side of things, you’ll find your chances to sell and make an impact will be greater. 

KindredReaders's insight:

In today's world of publishing, if you're an author, you're an entrepreneur. This article by @NinaAmir tells you how to be a steely eyed winner in a competitive field.  Pragmatism and project management are key, so those "in my other life" skills can prove valuable.

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KindredReaders's curator insight, April 6, 2:43 PM
In today's world of publishing, if you're an author, you're an entrepreneur. This article by @NinaAmir tells you how to be a steely eyed winner in a competitive field. Pragmatism and project management are key, so those "in my other life" skills can prove valuable.
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Crafting Interesting Characters

Crafting Interesting Characters | writing | Scoop.it

What qualities make a character memorable? In this article Karen Woodward explores five qualities that can make your characters jump off the page.


Via mooderino
KindredReaders's insight:

Karen includes lots of good examples to illustrate her points. I second her recommendation to read the posts on scenes and sequels.

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Stephen King’s Top 20 Rules for Writers

Stephen King’s Top 20 Rules for Writers | writing | Scoop.it
In one of my favorite Stephen King interviews, for The Atlantic, he talks at length about the vital importance of a good opening line. “There are all sorts of theories,” he says, “it’s a tricky thing.” “But there’s one thing” he’s sure about: “An opening line should invite the reader to begin the story.
KindredReaders's insight:

If you don't own "On Writing," you should. This piece contains some juicy tidbits.

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30 Awesome Writing Tips From Famous Writers - Ned Hardy

30 Awesome Writing Tips From Famous Writers - Ned Hardy | writing | Scoop.it

 

 

KindredReaders's insight:

I like the first one from Kurt Vonnegut: Use the time of a total stranger in such a way that he or she will not feel the time was wasted.

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5 Successful Authors On How They Overcame Creative Blocks To Write Their First Book

5 Successful Authors On How They Overcame Creative Blocks To Write Their First Book | writing | Scoop.it
Agonizing over every sentence, losing years of research, receiving rejection after rejection--writing a book isn't always the divinely creative...
KindredReaders's insight:

I found Mira Jacob's advice particularly helpful.

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Sharifah Raudhah AlQudsy's curator insight, April 29, 4:12 AM

Truthful advise from successful people are often very very liberating.

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7 Ways Authors Can Organize Their Pre-Writing

7 Ways Authors Can Organize Their Pre-Writing | writing | Scoop.it
I'd bet all authors love that feeling of having a new, viable idea they can develop into a novel. I DEFINITELY do. It's one of the most exciting experiences attached to the writing process, on a pa...
KindredReaders's insight:

The best part of this piece is it very gently takes you by the hand and says, Yes, I know it's wonderful ... but is this a crush or the real thing? 

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KindredReaders's curator insight, March 5, 11:44 AM

The best part of this piece is it very gently takes you by the hand and says, Yes, I know it's wonderful ... but is this a crush or the real thing? 

Sharifah Raudhah AlQudsy's curator insight, April 29, 4:13 AM

The word organise will haunt you if ever one wants to create something of value.

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Greatest Fear: How to Find It and Run with It - Writingeekery

Greatest Fear: How to Find It and Run with It - Writingeekery | writing | Scoop.it
Fear intrigues. Layers of fear and root fear, reaction and defense make it even more intriguing.
KindredReaders's insight:

Humans are genetically programmed to survive. Think deeply about what that means in terms of primal motivators like hunger and fear, and your story will resonate with the reader's subconscious.

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Why Writers Are the Worst Procrastinators

Why Writers Are the Worst Procrastinators | writing | Scoop.it
The psychological origins of waiting (... and waiting, and waiting) to work
KindredReaders's insight:

I was supposed to be writing now but instead I posted this ;)

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Nabokov on Inspiration and the Six Short Stories Everyone Should Read

Nabokov on Inspiration and the Six Short Stories Everyone Should Read | writing | Scoop.it

“Show up, show up, show up,” Isabel Allende advised, “and after a while the muse shows up, too.” “Inspiration is for amateurs,” Chuck Close famously proclaimed, “the rest of us just show up and get to work.” “When you work regularly,” Gretchen Rubin asserted, “inspiration strikes regularly.”But as prescriptive as we may get about the pursuit and attainment of inspiration, its very nature remains ever-elusive.

That’s precisely what Vladimir Nabokov addresses in an essay titled “Inspiration,” a fine addition to famous writers’ collected wisdom on writing, originally published in the Saturday Review on November 20, 1972, and found in Strong Opinions (public library) — the same fantastic volume that gave us the author’s rare BBC interview on literature and life.


Via Sharon Bakar
KindredReaders's insight:

My favorite bits: the assertion that creativity is subtraction (i.e., to invent is to choose), and the six recommended short stories.

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Sharon Bakar's curator insight, August 7, 5:34 AM

Nabokov on inspiration and the 6 short stories he recommends.

Sharon Bakar's curator insight, August 7, 5:37 AM

Nabokov on inspiration.

Christa Wojo's curator insight, August 8, 8:08 AM

How do you rouse your muse?

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John Green’s Superb Advice to Aspiring Writers and Creators in the Digital Age

John Green’s Superb Advice to Aspiring Writers and Creators in the Digital Age | writing | Scoop.it

A vital reminder of the only good reason to put something into the world.


Via Christi Krug, KindredReaders
KindredReaders's insight:

In a nutshell: "Don’t make stuff because you want to make money — it will never make you enough money. And don’t make stuff because you want to get famous — because you will never feel famous enough. Make gifts for people — and work hard on making those gifts in the hope that those people will notice and like the gifts." -- John Green

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Christi Krug's curator insight, June 17, 1:43 PM

"Don’t make stuff because you want to make money — it will never make you enough money. And [not] because you want to get famous — because you will never feel famous enough. Make gifts for people." --John Green

KindredReaders's curator insight, June 18, 12:41 PM

In a nutshell: "Don’t make stuff because you want to make money — it will never make you enough money. And don’t make stuff because you want to get famous — because you will never feel famous enough. Make gifts for people — and work hard on making those gifts in the hope that those people will notice and like the gifts." -- John Green

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How to Write the Perfect First Page

How to Write the Perfect First Page | writing | Scoop.it

Recently I attended a workshop called “American Author” inspired by American Idol. People anonymously submitted the first pages of their novels, which were read aloud to a panel of editors and agents. The panel then provided their immediate, brutally honest feedback for all to hear.

Given my past post on how to write the perfect first page, I thought it was important to add to it by sharing what I learned from hearing the perspective of people who have read hundreds, if not thousands, of first pages.


Via mooderino
KindredReaders's insight:

This should actually be called How NOT to write a first page, and it's worth reading.

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Sharifah Raudhah AlQudsy's curator insight, April 29, 4:11 AM

Getting advise and insight from people who have attended a workshop on topics of your interest is as good as attending them, especially when you can't afford to attend yet.

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How To Create The Ultimate Story Plot

How To Create The Ultimate Story Plot | writing | Scoop.it

There is only one winning plot, in all the stories of the world, and it’s very simple:

Boy meets hamster.
Boy loses hamster.
Boy is reunited with hamster (or not).

For ‘boy’ read any principal character. For ‘hamster’ read any Object of Desire. 

KindredReaders's insight:

This deceptively simplistic post actually encapsulates real wisdom.

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KindredReaders's curator insight, April 20, 12:40 PM

This deceptively simplistic post actually encapsulates real wisdom. 

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Letters of Note: Make your soul grow

Letters of Note: Make your soul grow | writing | Scoop.it

Kurt Vonnegut's advice to a high school student who'd invited him to visit their English class.

KindredReaders's insight:
Vonnegut's advice: Practice ANY art, not to get money or fame, but to experience becoming, to find out what is inside you, to make your soul grow.
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KindredReaders's curator insight, April 13, 1:08 PM

Vonnegut's advice: Practice ANY art, not to get money or fame, but to experience becoming, to find out what is inside you, to make your soul grow.

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Creating Believable High Stakes for Your Characters

Creating Believable High Stakes for Your Characters | writing | Scoop.it

A character in a fantasy novel goes through some magical portal into another world, where he learns he is the deliverer foretold to save this hidden kingdom. He’s your average guy and knows nothing about this world. Without hesitation, he not only accepts the truth of this prophecy/claim/appointment (fill in the blank), he immediately is willing to risk everything to assume the mantle of authority and responsibility.

 

But why the heck does he do that? I don’t know, and neither does the writer. Will the reader really believe someone, anyone, would do that? No. Sorry.


Via mooderino
KindredReaders's insight:

Good reality check ... just one piece in a great series by Susanne Lakin

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Here's What Both Pantsing and Plotting Miss: The Real Story

Here's What Both Pantsing and Plotting Miss: The Real Story | writing | Scoop.it

"Both Pantsing and Plotting, by definition, bypass the key element around which a story is built. Readers don’t come to story for what happens on the surface (think: the plot), they come to get insight into what goes on beneath the surface."

KindredReaders's insight:

This piece is steeped in significance. I've been itching to put pen to paper on a new project but I now realize I can save quite a lot of time and pain in revision by taking a step back. Highly recommended! 

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Making Characters Unforgettable a.k.a. Character Arc

Making Characters Unforgettable a.k.a. Character Arc | writing | Scoop.it

What stands out in your memory? The plot points or the characters? For me, 95% of the time it’s the characters. 

 


Via Ruth Long
KindredReaders's insight:

Peppered with specific examples ... always helpful!

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Writing The Perfect Flaw - Writingeekery

Writing The Perfect Flaw - Writingeekery | writing | Scoop.it
Are you writing your characters with the right flaws?
KindredReaders's insight:

This may seem obvious but it's actually core to understanding your characters and advancing the plot. Excellent, thought-provoking post by MJ Bush. 

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KindredReaders's curator insight, March 18, 11:42 AM

This may seem obvious but it's actually core to understanding your characters and advancing the plot. Excellent, thought-provoking post by MJ Bush. 

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Planning Character Arcs

Planning Character Arcs | writing | Scoop.it

If you like to plan your stories ahead, you’ve almost certainly sketched out your plot. But have you planned your character arcs? Every story needs a character arc for its protagonist, even if it’s simple or subtly conveyed. And while supporting characters don’t always need an arc, stories are better off when they’re included.

 

Luckily, characters arcs work very much like any other plot strand you might be working on. The difference is that they focus on inner events rather than external ones, which can make them harder to wrap your head around. If you have a character that needs an arc and you’re not sure how to add one, these steps will get you started.


Via Ruth Long
KindredReaders's insight:

Most of us think of supporting characters in terms of the role they need to play. This article suggests you step back and think of the constellation of characters as a whole, then as individuals. A worthwhile read!

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6 Writing Lessons from Alfred Hitchcock’s Rear Window | WritersDigest.com

6 Writing Lessons from Alfred Hitchcock’s Rear Window | WritersDigest.com | writing | Scoop.it

Every time you watch a film or TV show, read a book, listen to a song, or play a video game, think…What can this teach me about writing?

KindredReaders's insight:

Take a lesson from a master of suspense ....

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