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Vintage Slang Terms For Being Drunk Are Hilarious A Century Later

Vintage Slang Terms For Being Drunk Are Hilarious A Century Later | Writing and publishing books | Scoop.it
Do you think that people didn't get wasted back in ye olden tymes?

Via Deanna Dahlsad
Catharine Bramkamp's insight:

This article reminded me of the Newbie Writers Podcast episode, the Slang Smack Down.  We have so many slang words that go in and out of fashion and are sometimes specific to a certain group.  Here are a couple:

He has been measuring sidewalks upside down.

 

He is holding up his head so as not to lose any.

 

He has a champagne appetite and beer income drunk.

 

He has a cold tea drunk.

 

He has a pink tea drunk.During the holidays, don't get so drunk you think the next liquid is only pink tea!
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Gracie Passette's curator insight, November 13, 2013 10:48 PM

Cuz drinking is the emotional lubricant ;)

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31 Question to Ask About Your Characters | Wise Ink's Blog for Indie Authors about Self-Publishing

31 Question to Ask About Your Characters | Wise Ink's Blog for Indie Authors about Self-Publishing | Writing and publishing books | Scoop.it
Catharine Bramkamp's insight:

When we create characters, we often sketch them out, and if you are doing it right, you aren't inserting too much information into the story itself, but it helps to determine if your hero is right or left handed before the sword fight.

 

Another technique a friend of mine uses is to assign a zodiac sign to her characters, then use the description of say, a Gemini to inform the reactions and personality of her characters.

 

Maybe don't answer all these questions, but do keep track of all your character's quirks and preferences. 

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Stop Writing Dystopian Sci-Fi—It’s Making Us All Fear Technology | Opinion | WIRED

Stop Writing Dystopian Sci-Fi—It’s Making Us All Fear Technology | Opinion | WIRED | Writing and publishing books | Scoop.it
But for their capacity to change the way people think and feel about technology, the stories we tell ourselves can save us---if we can just escape the cool veneer of our dystopian house of horrors.
Catharine Bramkamp's insight:

I love dystopic literature, I'm writing a series myself and am  deep into creating a country where the politics go completely wrong - even more wrong than House of Cards.  I write about embedded computer chips  fueled by our body's natural electric impulses.  I write about a seductive and powerful Reality Cloud that makes anything and everything accessible so that people don't need to go anywhere to be everywhere. Is that cool?  Certainly.  Is it problematic?  Of course.

 

To Mr. Solana; don't panic quite yet.  I agree with you, I did not like  The Road  and am still mystified by its Pulitzer win. But there is value in dystopic novels as well as Utopic ones.  I am indebted to the authors of  Logan's Run, Brave New World, The Handmaids Tale and 1984 for pointing out how bad things can get if we don't do something.  For by taking the future to a bitter end, we, as creatives can help frame the next conversation  focused on avoiding the bad news.  

Knowledge is power. Especially before it happens.

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Publisher Books, Authors and Artists Adds Unique Content for Their Readers

Louisville, KY -- (ReleaseWire) -- 08/06/2014 -- Books, Authors, and Artists (BAA) announced they would continue providing readers with extra, unique and original content at the end of their current and future titles - an enhanced ‘About the Author’ section containing character interviews by the author.
Catharine Bramkamp's insight:

An Interesting idea for fiction authors. At the end of the novel, add in an "interview"  with your main character. This is a great way to include background that didn't make it in the book, or set up information that will be relevant for the sequel.

 

If you don't have much more to add to your characters, post an interview with yourself - pretend you are discussing your work with an engaged book club.  Write it down and add it to the end of the novel.

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Test Your Creativity: 5 Classic Creative Challenges

Test Your Creativity: 5 Classic Creative Challenges | Writing and publishing books | Scoop.it
How creative are you? Find out by taking a few quick tests that psychologists have been using to study creativity for decades. (RT @ProfJamieA: Test Your Creativity: 5 Classic Creative Challenges.

Via F. Thunus
Catharine Bramkamp's insight:

Save this for Friday afternoon, then explain that you were just exercising your ability to solve problems a little better. A worthy use of your time.

 

One of my challenges with these kinds of tests (also during an optometrist appt.)  is that I try to earn  an A.  How can you get an A in an eye test?  A good creative question!

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The 10 Biggest Mistakes New Authors Make

The 10 Biggest Mistakes New Authors Make | Writing and publishing books | Scoop.it
I have to preface this post by noting how easy it is to make mistakes when you're on the road to becoming a published author. This is an emotional journey, and…
Catharine Bramkamp's insight:

I like Brooke Warner, the author of this blog, she delivers tried and true information for the Newbie Writer here and I have little to add except that traditional publishing can be wonderful, but as Brooke points out, traditional is also slow - very slow.  If you have a non-fiction book and you are working from your professional base, then self publishing (and she makes many suggestions about self publishing here as well) is the way to go.

 

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Nicholas C. Rossis's curator insight, August 28, 10:02 PM

Great article; when reading it, you'll go 'but, of course, that makes sense', but most of us, authors, have probably made one or two of these mistakes.  

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What Do Writers Have in Common? - Huffington Post

What Do Writers Have in Common? - Huffington Post | Writing and publishing books | Scoop.it
What Do Writers Have in Common?
Huffington Post
I attended my first writer's conference in 2001. I didn't really know what to expect but I was excited to meet other writers and I assumed that we would have a lot in common.
Catharine Bramkamp's insight:

"I don't want anyone to steal my ideas."  I have so much sympathy for newbie writers.  Some writers really do think their ideas can be stolen, some will knock over a dozen people for the chance to thrust their manuscript at a hapless agent.  Some never work up the nerve to talk with anyone about their work and some never stop talking.

 

Stealing ideas or plots, or specifics from a manuscript does happen of course, but more often we are all inspired by the same idea and then work to create a unique take on that idea.  Yes, we all have similar ideas, but the very fact that you are writing it, that it is filtered through your own personality and experiences will make it unique.  

 

No one writes just like you.  And we all know how to check for plagiarism and link back to original resources, so that's pretty much off the table.

 

So talk, share, get ideas from other writers (or anyone else in your line of work)  sharing doesn't double your information, it triples it, it exponentially increases it.  And the new writer you talk to today, may turn into the agent who calls you tomorrow.

 

 

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24 books that predicted the future - BookBaby Blog

24 books that predicted the future - BookBaby Blog | Writing and publishing books | Scoop.it
Catharine Bramkamp's insight:

If you think of Star Trek when you pull out your phone - Science Fiction writers have been predicting the future since it was possible to imagine it.  

 

For instance, in 1984, living spaces are dominated by enormous video screens that never power down and perpetual surveillance. Many novels, like Fahrengeit 451, feature governments dead set on controlling information. (As they did in the past, this is not a new idea).

 

And my favorite feature of Bellamy's Looking Backwards was not that the future was all clean and that credit cards were used in lieu of cash, it was that for all his forward thinking, the author couldn't imagine women dressed in anything else but corsets and bustles.  So maybe he predicted Steam Punk.

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Lost Booksellers of New York

Lost Booksellers of New York | Writing and publishing books | Scoop.it
Literary merchants reigned once upon a time, but not happily ever after.
Catharine Bramkamp's insight:

Instead of singing "There is nothing like a dame"  We should sing, "there is nothing like a book store".  I have great respect for Amazon in that I can access my addiction night and day.  But even though the stores listed in this article  are gone, the thrill clearly remains.

 

Celebrate a book store today!  Locally we have Copperfields, Book Passages and a wealth of small and used book stores.

Don't get me started on small used book stores, those are like treasure chests - you never know what you'll find and you never know what you cannot live without.

 

Am I the only person pulled inexorably into any store with at least one book in the window display?  Even if the store actually sells cooking utensils?

 

I understand cooking utensils are handy.

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Sketching on tablets promising for collaborative design, creativity

Sketching on tablets promising for collaborative design, creativity | Writing and publishing books | Scoop.it
(Phys.org) —Two new 'cyberlearning' platforms allow non-artists to create illustrations rivaling the work of expert designers.
Catharine Bramkamp's insight:

New platforms that help the creative and wanna be creative.  I love the idea of drawing, but cannot draw, finally there may be on-line platforms that will aid those of us who have great ideas in our heads, but no muscle memory or even talent, in our fingers!

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The Myth of Creative Inspiration: Great Artists Don't Wait

The Myth of Creative Inspiration: Great Artists Don't Wait | Writing and publishing books | Scoop.it
Franz Kafka is considered one of the most creative and influential writers of the 20th century, but he actually spent most of his time working as a lawyer for the Workers Accident Insurance Institute. How did Kafka produce such fantastic creative works while holding down his day job? By sticking to a strict schedule.
Catharine Bramkamp's insight:

It's National Poetry Month!  And one of my favorite poets, TS Eliot needed to earn a living at a real job so he could write his great poems. He worked at a bank, which explains the Waste Land.  

 

The point is that great artists don't need to be full time artists.  If you want to create, find some time - some consistent time - some routine - and create within that space.  Maybe you can write a few lines towards your book during the lunch break.  Maybe you can sit in the car for ten minutes before walking into the house at the end of the day.

For many of us a popular option is to get up early and work for half an hour (when I needed to get children to school) or an hour (after they sort of left home) before life intruded.

 

A little time for art is enough time.  Find ten minutes today.  See what happens.

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19 Daily Habits Of Artists That Can Help Unlock Your Creativity

19 Daily Habits Of Artists That Can Help Unlock Your Creativity | Writing and publishing books | Scoop.it
You don't have to be a famous painter or sculptor to sympathize with the pains of creative block. Whether it comes on like a giant smack in the face or creeps up on you like a shiver down your spine, we've all dealt with the woes of being stuck. You ...
Catharine Bramkamp's insight:

Don't always create with the goal of making a product.  I think that is one of the best of these 19 creativity habits.  To create wonderful, great work, we need to allow for experimentation and allow for "failure" which, as we all know, are simply those things that didn't work.

 

Creativity and art should provide pleasure in the doing.  Creativity and art is often about the process, that wonderful zen moment when you lose track of time and just be, either in painting, music or writing.  And those moments of pure bliss are enough - that is your product.  So instead of beginning with the end in mind - just begin.

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James Patterson’s Bookstore Bailout: Planning for the Future or Living in the Past? | Wise Ink's Blog for Indie Authors about Self-Publishing

Catharine Bramkamp's insight:

I am thrilled that James Patterson is donating money to book stores.  Despite the controversy (outlined in the attached blog from Wise Ink) books stores are still our friends.  Do I shop at a grocery store in order to squeeze the avocados instead of ordering on line for delivery?  Yes.  Do I still meet friends in person for a real lunch rather than just tweet and update my Facebook posts?  Yes.

 

There is still a place for bookstores. Think of bookstores as public museums or galleries: books are curated and vetted, books are displayed on shelves and tables.  The experts and staff are knowledgable and bring a new way of viewing material to their customers. A book store is an experience that cannot be replicated virtually.

 

Books, real books, will not be replaced by ebooks.  They will still exist because the art of them will always exist. Ebooks are fabulous, I write them and publish ebooks through Kindle KDP, but I still love printing my books. I still like to see them on a shelf. I still buy my friend's books, I still collect too many physical books. I love books.  Most authors do.


There is room for all kinds of print and electronic options. What will happen is some books and material will be perfect for hard cover publishing, some material will be ideal posted in just e-formats, and some work will need to be published in many forms to accommodate how readers want to consume the content.

 

So why not donate to book stores?  Why not keep a culture alive?

I don't think brick and mortar stores are dying and I don't think it's foolish to support them.  I think it's foolish to advocate for only one way to gather information, or demand we enjoy only one specific   way to enjoy a novel.  

 

So do download ebooks onto your kindle or iPad.Collect your wish list on Amazon.  Then travel to a book store and see what else is on the shelf. Enjoy the reality of it all.

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Pitch-O-Rama 2014 - Women's National Book Association, San Francisco Chapter

Pitch-O-Rama 2014 - Women's National Book Association, San Francisco Chapter | Writing and publishing books | Scoop.it
Meet the Agents and EditorsSaturday, March 29, 2014, 8:00 am – 12:30 pm Women’s Building, 3543 18th St. (between Guerrero & Valencia Sts.), San Francisco Continental Breakfast with treats from Tartine Bakery We are thrilled to move the 11th Annual Pitch-O-Rama to the heart of the hip Mission District! Our new venue, the Women’s Building, is an appropriate Read More...
Catharine Bramkamp's insight:

Easy way to get your book proposal heard.   

 

I love Pitch-O-Rama, and I really love volunteering to help authors figure out the best way to pitch their projects to editors and agents.  This is one of the best ways to get your book "out there" and it's close with a supportive and friendly vibe.   

Space is limited, check it out today!

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14: Summer 2014: Writers, Follow the Trends vs. Follow Your Heart | Author Entrepreneurship Magazine

14: Summer 2014: Writers, Follow the Trends vs. Follow Your Heart | Author Entrepreneurship Magazine | Writing and publishing books | Scoop.it
Catharine Bramkamp's insight:

This was such an interesting subject to write about.  I won't bore you, you can read my article in this issue.

For writers, it's worth considering:  Follow the trends, or follow your heart? 

 

Do you want to turn something around quickly and hop on the bandwagon or do you want to pursue your passion and spend your days immersed in something you truly love?

 

Either approach is a legitimate. 

 

Just as long as you are doing what you want, not what you think you should be doing.

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bigwords101 — What Do Editors Do? Different Types of Editors

bigwords101 — What Do Editors Do? Different Types of Editors | Writing and publishing books | Scoop.it
This post describes the different types of editors and explains the job of each, including substantive, developmental, copy, technical, tempo, line, and proofreaders.
Catharine Bramkamp's insight:

I love this info-graphic that explains the difference between content editors and proof readers.  I work with clients as a content editor, the coach who helps writers figure out what to say.  A proof reader figures out if you said it clearly.  Two different skill sets, and two necessary professionals to have on your book team.

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Nicholas C. Rossis's curator insight, August 28, 9:58 PM

I think finding an editor that suits your style is crucial.  I feel that an editor must understand and respect your writing; he/she should make it better, not different.  

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Marketing Tips from New York Times Bestselling Author Sharon Hamilton - Social Media Just for Writers

Marketing Tips from New York Times Bestselling Author Sharon Hamilton - Social Media Just for Writers | Writing and publishing books | Scoop.it
Sharon Hamilton is a New York Times and USA Today bestselling author. She didn’t rise to fame by chasing literary agents or signing a deal with a New York publishing house. Sharon is an Indie author whose dedication to writing and marketing has propelled her career to heights she might not have imagined possible when …
Catharine Bramkamp's insight:

This is a great interview with my friend Sharon Hamilton written by my friend Frances Caballo (full disclosure). 

I met Sharon when she was working on her first paranormal romance. We mapped out the book, I read the drafts. And I assured her she wasn't crazy for leaving her Real Estate career and following her passion for writing.


 I was right.  

 

Sharon's story is a great example of not only how an indie writer and publisher can make it, but also how following your dreams can lead to great success.

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What's Your Book Shelfie Style?

What's Your Book Shelfie Style? | Writing and publishing books | Scoop.it
Kids today, right? If we’re not taking selfies, we’re taking relfies, or ussies. Most importantly of all, however, we’re taking shelfies -- particularly, if you’re anything like us, book shelfies.

The book shelfie is, at ...
Catharine Bramkamp's insight:

Couldn't resist sharing this absolutely shallow article on how to get your book shelves ready for their close up.  The good news is that Claire Fallon did not suggest covering all the books on a shelf with the same plain white dust jacket so they look better in the living room.

 

My books are organized by subject - all the poetry together, all the writing books together - all the history books together, all the travel books grouped together.  That way, unlike organizing books by height or spine color, I can easily find a book when I need it.

 

Perhaps we could consider any book case that holds more books than vases, framed photos and stuffed animals that seemed appropriately ironic at the time - art.

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Colorwise Book Printing Blog - Digital Publishing, Self Publishers, Commercial Book Printing Blog

Colorwise Book Printing Blog - Digital Publishing, Self Publishers, Commercial Book Printing Blog | Writing and publishing books | Scoop.it
by David Rogers The feel. The smell. Owning something concrete. There are plenty of reasons we love print books, and the folks over at Fat Brain have
Catharine Bramkamp's insight:

Even though we love e-books, we love hard copy books as much or more - in the future will children hunt down that exact copy of Fahrenheit 451 because they remember how it felt in their hands? Will the next generation care about owning the right copy of A Little Princess with the color plates by Tasha Tudor?

 

We live side by side with books, sometimes even buying the hard copy even after reading the ebook - there is still a difference - and for those of us who read everything - that difference just means more!

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The 10 Types of Writers' Block (and How to Overcome Them)

The 10 Types of Writers' Block (and How to Overcome Them) | Writing and publishing books | Scoop.it
Writer's Block. It sounds like a fearsome condition, a creative blockage. The end of invention. But what is it, really?
Catharine Bramkamp's insight:

We all get blocked, sometimes it's because we've reached a boring part in our novel, or we've reached an impasse at work.

 

For the novel, one way to unblock is to skip over that boring part. Sometimes you don't need to explain how the heroine got home, or what she did  before she went to bed. Skip it all and start with "The next morning the monster crashed through her roof".  Now we're back to interesting.

 

For work - what if the slog, the part that is slowing down the interesting bits - was streamlined?  Can you hire an expert?  Can you make this move faster?  Eliminate a few meetings?

 

Unblock - skip the boring bits.  Good luck!

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Is the internet an enemy of writers' creativity?

Is the internet an enemy of writers' creativity? | Writing and publishing books | Scoop.it
George RR Martin's "secret weapon" is to keep a separate computer without Internet access to concentrate on his writing. Are online distractions killing your writing flow? (Is the internet an enemy of writers' creativity?
Catharine Bramkamp's insight:

How to  make the space for creativity is a constant conundrum  - witness the article about RR Martin who uses an antiquated word processing program to write because it’s not as distracting as writing on a computer that is internet accessible.   I didn’t know that was possible.   

 

However, staying connected can help your creativity. If  I’m stuck on a word and can’t find it in one of the two dictionaries on my computer, I actually Google it, which more often than not, gets me the spelling and definition I need.

 

Or I need to confirm a date or a time as I write my current book (Good as Gold) - again, the internet is fast and easy.

 

The problem is distraction. Once we find that word definition on Google, the Zappos ad isn’t too far away from our line of sight.  Oh, I need purple shoes - and we’re off.

But this is only slightly different than the distraction of looking up words in a dictionary.

Oh, hobble is spelled with two . . .  What is a hobblebush? (American Heritage Dictionary 5th Edition, and I own the hard copy, habits die hard).

 

And I would argue that the distractions can fuel creativity as you’re led from one thing to the next.

 

What we writers need to figure out is how to  control the internet and how to control our responses to it.  And answer the question, how badly do you want to finish your book?

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Cleis Press and Viva Editions Recognized for Excellence in Independent Publishing

Cleis Press and Viva Editions Recognized for Excellence in Independent Publishing | Writing and publishing books | Scoop.it
(PRWEB) May 05, 2014 -- Cleis Press and its imprint Viva Editions have won six book awards from the 2014 Independent Publisher Awards.
Catharine Bramkamp's insight:

Shout out to Brenda Knight and all the good people at Viva Editions/Cleis Press.  They deserve the kudos.  The press has been supportive of WNBA-SF giving their expertise and time to newbie writers all over the Bay Area.  And Brenda was a delightful guest on Newbie Writers Podcast.

 

This is what an Indie Publisher can do.  Their clients are more than happy with their books, their publicity and how well they are treated by the editors and managers at Cleis/Viva.

 

I was delighted to come across their awards list.  Congratulations!

 

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Prather’s Pick: Writing a book can be fun

Prather’s Pick: Writing a book can be fun | Writing and publishing books | Scoop.it
This week’s book, written by Elizabeth Sims and published by Writer’s Digest Books, is not only filled with valuable information about the writing process, but it’s fun to read, too!

“You’ve Got a Book In You” (a stress-free guide to writing the book of your dreams) is written in a humorous, down-to-earth style. Sims has dedicated the book “to anyone who has ever looked at a shelf full of books and thought, ‘I wonder if I could do that.’”
Catharine Bramkamp's insight:

I don't know about fun - writing a book is all consuming and often plunges the writers into months of obsession and anti-social  behavior.  So if you need to be anti social, there is never a better excuse than to be writing and researching a book.  

But a good time?  I have my doubts.

 

But I do agree that in that marvelous first draft, writers should let themselves go and just write.  That I will support.

And add this to your books on writing shelf.

 

Let me know when you start having fun.

 

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What is the ideal price for a shorter eBook? - BookBaby Blog

What is the ideal price for a shorter eBook? - BookBaby Blog | Writing and publishing books | Scoop.it
Does the price of an eBook single affect its sales? The short answer: yes, but not as much as you might think. For shorter eBooks (20-100 pages),...
Catharine Bramkamp's insight:

I am asked this question a lot.  How to price an e-book?  Short books, as mentioned in this article have been successfully sold for about $1.99 per download.

 

But $1.99 also works as a price for a full novel.  $2.99 for a novel is also a good price point.  As is free.  Interestingly, $.99 is not a popular price for novels or short novellas.  Perhaps because that's what we expect to pay for a song download - and books last longer than a song.  But you can play a song repeatedly whereas we usually don't read books over and over.

 

I think this is part analytics and frankly, part art.  So if you are about to upload your great book or short collection, do a quick search on Amazon and see what books just like yours are selling for, match that price, or drop your own book a little lower than the average.

 

 

 

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Book Culture — Teaching & Learning — Medium

Book Culture — Teaching & Learning — Medium | Writing and publishing books | Scoop.it
Required reading has long been a tenet of schools.
Catharine Bramkamp's insight:

A new and controversial idea, are required reading lists our own worse enemies?  Could be. 

 

If we want to create readers we may want to allow for more Stephen King and less Stephen Crane.  More Anne Rice and less Anne of Green Gables.  Why?  Because if the first thing a student thinks of when they see a book is "bah, boring" then we've lose the war.

I prefer assigning books that will scare the hell out of students, like the Handmaid's Tale or 1984.  Then fill in with what is fairly relevant today, even link books with the films.  I know it's heresy, but books and ideas are too important to be inadvertently allowed to die. 

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You Might Be Using This Word All Wrong

You Might Be Using This Word All Wrong | Writing and publishing books | Scoop.it
Poor, beleaguered Alanis Morissette has long borne the brunt of our society’s pedantry about the word ironic. Sure, her song “Ironic” notoriously misuses the word (around 10 times) and repeatedly insists that rain on your wedding da...
Catharine Bramkamp's insight:

Since I diss Morissette consistently in my college classes, I felt that I owed the rest of us an explanation of the term Irony.  It is not a fly in your Chardonnay.  A fly in your Chardonnay is just icky.

 

Credit the Greeks for inventing the idea in the first place.  At it's heart, irony is working very hard to avoid something (like killing your father and marrying your mother) and then in the effort to avoid, you bring about the very disaster you wanted to miss.  That's irony.

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