Writing about Life in the digital age
464 views | +0 today
Follow
 
Rescooped by rodrick rajive lal from Public Relations & Social Media Insight
onto Writing about Life in the digital age
Scoop.it!

Between a quarter and a third of everything on the web is copied from somewhere else

Between a quarter and a third of everything on the web is copied from somewhere else | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

There’s a lot of junk on the web. There is also a lot of good stuff on the web. And then there is the stuff that’s been lifted from the good and dropped amid the dross—the aggregation, the block-quotes, the straight-off copy-paste jobs.


The extent of that duplication now has a number: according to Matt Cutts, a long time Google search engineer who developed Google’s family-friendly “SafeSearch” filter and who now leads Google’s web spam team, “something like 25% or 30% of the web’s content is duplicate content.”


That’s not necessarily a bad thing. Not all of the duplication is plagiarized or hastily created traffic-seeking junk. Examples of inoffensive duplication include quotes from blogs that link back to the original blog, or the thousands of pages of technical manuals scattered across the web that are updated with small changes but remain largely the same..


Via Jeff Domansky
rodrick rajive lal's insight:
Yes, we have become the copy-paste generation because of the Internet! This, in itself makes it necessary to avoid plagiarism! A number of Universities in the US have disqualified researches that have had plagiarism issues.
more...
Jeff Domansky's curator insight, December 19, 2013 3:47 AM

Fascinating research and interesting reading for all content producers.

Deanna Dahlsad's curator insight, December 19, 2013 5:44 AM

25%-30% sometimes seems low; but then again, I do hate to find some splogger with my stuff so my ire may seem to weight those numbers.

Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by rodrick rajive lal from Business Improvement
Scoop.it!

How to Kill Dead Space and Achieve More in Business

How to Kill Dead Space and Achieve More in Business | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

When you reduce Dead Space, you reduce the time it takes to accomplish your goals.


Via Daniel Watson
rodrick rajive lal's insight:
Dead space is a silent but deadly killer of initiative and success in business and life. Umberto Eco the expert on semiotics referred to Dead Space when he used the word Interstices. The idea is to fill up the empty spaces in our lives by doing something constructive. Take for example the time it takes for your friend to ascend to your flat using the elevator while you wait for him at the top. That is an interstice that you can fill up by writing something. If we were to remove the empty space from the whole universe, then theortically at least, the whole universe can be compressed to the size of an orange!
more...
Daniel Watson's curator insight, April 27, 11:36 PM

 

We all know that work expands to fill the time available in which to complete it. The difference between the actual time physically taken to complete a task, and the lapsed time between beginning and completing the task, is what is known as dead space. If you can kill the dead space, you will achieve far more in your business life, and this article highlights three steps to take to become personally more productive.

Appolon Noel's comment, April 30, 1:53 PM
this is dead on .
Rescooped by rodrick rajive lal from Public Relations & Social Media Insight
Scoop.it!

How Media Consumption Habits Are Changing

How Media Consumption Habits Are Changing | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

Millennials age 14-25 now spend more time streaming online video content than watching live television, according to a recent report from Deloitte. The report was based on data conducted in November 2015 of 2,205 consumers in the United States.


The researchers examined the media consumption habits of four generations: Millennials (born between 1983 and 2001); Generation X (1966-1982); Baby Boomers (1947-1965), and Matures (prior to 1947). More than half of all US consumers, and three-quarters of Millennials, watch movies and TV shows via streaming on at least a monthly basis, the researchers found.


Other key insights from the report: 


- 70% Americans binge-watch television content, viewing an average of five episodes at a time.


- 90% of US consumers say they multitask while watching TV.


- Nearly three quarters of Millennials age 19-32 say they are more influenced in their buying decisions by social media recommendations than TV ads.


- Social media sites have surpassed television as the most popular source of news for Millennials....


Via Jeff Domansky
rodrick rajive lal's insight:
Media consumption habits are changing and fewer people watch TV these days. As a corallary to this, it is becoming clear that social media is gaining popularity over TV. Consumers are more likely to be influenced by advertisements they come across on online socia media than advertisements that appear on TV. Social media sites are overtaking TV as a source of information, and entertainment.
more...
Jeff Domansky's curator insight, April 16, 1:05 AM

Millennials love streaming online video rather than watching live TV says Deloitte.

Rescooped by rodrick rajive lal from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
Scoop.it!

Complaining Is Terrible for You, According to Science

Complaining Is Terrible for You, According to Science | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

Why do people complain? Not to torture others with their negativity, surely. When most of us indulge in a bit of a moan, the idea is to "vent." By getting our emotions out, we reason, we'll feel better.

 

But science suggests there are a few serious flaws in that reasoning. One, not only does expressing negativity tend not to make us feel better, it's also catching, making listeners feel worse. "People don't break wind in elevators more than they have to. Venting anger is...similar to emotional farting in a closed area. It sounds like a good idea, but it's dead wrong," psychologist Jeffrey Lohr, who has studied venting, memorably explained.

 

OK, so complaining is bad for your mood and the mood of your friends and colleagues, but that's not all that's wrong with frequent negativity. Apparently, it's also bad for your brain and your health. Yes, really.


Via The Learning Factor
rodrick rajive lal's insight:
Complaining according to many is infectuous and therefore something to be frowned upon. For administrators and those in Managerial positions, emlpoyees who complain are a liabilty because they poison the minds of others. We have all heard about the Pygmallion effect and know that the story that we project is the story that will go around.
more...
The Learning Factor's curator insight, April 14, 6:23 PM

Steeping yourself in negativity has seriously terrible consequences for your mental and physical health.

Scooped by rodrick rajive lal
Scoop.it!

How the Company Behind Common Core Plans to Conquer the World With For-Profit Schools

How the Company Behind Common Core Plans to Conquer the World With For-Profit Schools | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it
Pearson, the company behind Common Core and the US testing-industrial complex, plans to conquer the entire world with its new model for education.
rodrick rajive lal's insight:
We are talking about low cost privates schools that are less expensive to run, and can do with fewer manpower resources. I wonder if this model might not work under the public private partnership model being mooted in India today. Most Government schools are lagging in terms of manpower resources, and infrasturcture, so, this low cost model might work well in India too, at least under the public-private partnership model. The use of technology, (Information technology resources) could help cover up deficiencies in terms of limited manpower resources and physical infrastructure without compromising on the quality of education!
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by rodrick rajive lal from Entrepreneurship, Innovation
Scoop.it!

Emotional Advertising: How Brands Use Feelings to Get People to Buy

Emotional Advertising: How Brands Use Feelings to Get People to Buy | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it
Learn how brands use the four core human emotions in advertising to influence buying behavior.

Via Marylene Delbourg-Delphis
rodrick rajive lal's insight:
We have all heard of Propaganda Techniques, advertising is all about touching emotions in a big way! Brands use feelings and emotions to get people to buy products even when they don't need them! Brand loyalty depends to a great deal on emotive attachments. Baby products for one thing exploit maternal feelings to a great deal, whether it is diapers, or clothes!
more...
Nicole Copeland's curator insight, April 15, 10:25 AM
Isn't it the same for learning? Don't we "buy in" when we feel that emotional or personal connection to the information? We may want to take a lesson from the best marketers who somehow know exactly how to get us to buy what they are selling.
Rescooped by rodrick rajive lal from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
Scoop.it!

The seven biggest sins of your working day

The seven biggest sins of your working day | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

They said computers would make us all a lot more productive, and free up our personal lives.

Is it just me, or was that all a big, fat porkie?

 

The technology that was supposed to bring us this gift of freedom has entrapped us, eroding valuable time, energy and attention. Don't get me wrong, I love new technology. But let's take a reality check and go back to using it to help us do our jobs, not to dictate and distract every waking moment.

Here are seven key productivity traps to be mindful of:

 

Via The Learning Factor
rodrick rajive lal's insight:
Andrew has hit the nail bang on! Technology and its attendant effects have indeed reduced our efficiency in a big way. Instead of making us more relaxed, technology has transformed us into obsessed individuals with an obsessive-compulsive need to check e-mails every now and then. Then comes that nifty little gadget, the smart phone-well organisations now promote the use of whats app as a means to connect to employees 24X7! Then we come to social networking sites, well, one has to open up facebook every now and then to check updates. Organisations have started encouraging the use of Facebook to promote themselves. The seven deadly sins according to Andrew include all of these, e-mails, social networking sites, poor body posture, (what with those fancy chairs that are harsh on the spine) lack of physical exercise, and so on.
more...
The Learning Factor's curator insight, April 7, 7:09 PM

The technology that was supposed to bring freedom instead entraps us.

hamidreza's curator insight, April 9, 11:21 AM
moldsduct's comment, April 11, 1:22 AM
Great
Rescooped by rodrick rajive lal from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
Scoop.it!

Want to be a better leader? Observe more and react less | McKinsey & Company

Want to be a better leader? Observe more and react less | McKinsey & Company | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

Most time-strapped executives know they should plan ahead and prioritize, focus on the important as much as the urgent, invest in their health (including getting enough sleep), make time for family and relationships, and limit (even if they don’t entirely avoid) mindless escapism. But doing this is easier said than done, as we all know—and as I, too, have learned during years of trying unsuccessfully to boost my effectiveness.

In my case, I stumbled upon an ancient meditation technique that, to my surprise, improved my mind’s ability to better resist the typical temptations that get in the way of developing productive and healthy habits. Much in the same way that intense, focused physical activity serves to energize and revitalize the body during the rest of the day, meditation is for me—and for the many other people who use it—like a mental aerobic exercise that declutters and detoxifies the mind to enhance its metabolic activity.


Via The Learning Factor
rodrick rajive lal's insight:
Manish has writtern a wonderful article that suggests how one can be a better leader. While the adage, observe more react less is true, the means of doing this would require not reacting immediately, or even postponing decision making for another day. Meditating, relaxing by taking a break, and I guess 'sleepiong over the problem could be a great help.  It has been noticed that knee-jerk reactions to e-mails and other correspondences might cause more harm than good!
more...
http://neistersen.com.tr/kategori/emlak/?kat1=45 Emlak İlanları, Emlak, Emlak Ankara's comment, April 5, 7:12 AM
http://neistersen.com.tr/kategori/emlak/?kat1=45 emlak, emlak ilanları, emlak siteleri, emlak konut, emlakçı, emlakçı siteleri, emlakçı ankara, emlak sitesi, satılık emlak, emlak ankara, emlak ilan, emlak ilanları ankara, emlak ilan siteleri, emlak ilanı ver, emlak ilanı, emlak ilan sitesi, en iyi emlak sitesi, emlak ofisi, ücretsiz emlak ilan siteleri, emlak fiyatları, emlak satış, emlak portalı, emlak firmaları, ücretsiz emlak siteleri
http://neistersen.com.tr/kategori/emlak/?kat1=45
Ines Bieler's curator insight, April 5, 8:42 AM

Overloaded executives need coping mechanisms. This personal reflection shows how meditation can help.

rodrick rajive lal's curator insight, April 7, 2:35 AM
Manish states very clearrly that it is not a good idea to react immediately to e-mails and make immediate decisions. Sometimes it is better to 'sleep over' over the problem! Taking a vacations before making a decision might help too!
Rescooped by rodrick rajive lal from Public Relations & Social Media Insight
Scoop.it!

How to Effortlessly Write Captivating Headlines

How to Effortlessly Write Captivating Headlines | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

Do you know what the average attention span of a reader is today? It’s 8.2 seconds. You read that right. The average attention span of someone visiting your page is less than it takes you to drink a glass of water. You have less than 10 seconds to convince your readers that your content is more than good; you have to convince them that it’s remarkable.

Luckily, you can make your headlines way better if you pay attention to a couple of simple rules....


Via Jeff Domansky
rodrick rajive lal's insight:

Better headlines get better readership – a simple blogging truth. Great article that differentiates between headlines and titles. Apparently what drives SEO is not just key-words, but also better headlines that direct readers to specific articles. Amazed to know that the attention span of adults has come done to 8.2 seconds! A good headline would have to grab the attention of the reader in less time than it takes you to dring a glass of water!

more...
GwynethJones's curator insight, April 3, 3:29 PM

"Better headlines get better readership – a simple blogging truth."

 

As long as they don't dip TOO HARD into Clickbait!

Angela Watkins's curator insight, April 3, 10:40 PM

Better headlines get better readership – a simple blogging truth.

Meg Basilio's curator insight, April 4, 7:31 AM

Better headlines get better readership – a simple blogging truth.

Rescooped by rodrick rajive lal from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
Scoop.it!

How Overfocusing on Goals Can Hold Us Back

How Overfocusing on Goals Can Hold Us Back | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

Imagine you want to design a robot that can get through a maze by itself. How might you go about it? First, you would probably define the robot’s objective: Find the exit of the maze. Then you would create a mechanism to reward the robot for moving toward that goal and to punish it for moving farther away, so that over time it finds its way out. But what if the robot comes to a dead end right next to the exit? It’s geographically as close as possible to its objective but it can’t get there. And it won’t want to turn around because that would mean moving away from the goal and getting punished. Your robot would be stuck.

Kenneth Stanley is a professor in artificial intelligence who has studied this problem, the stagnation that can result from dogged pursuit of a prescribed goal. Eventually he and his colleagues arrived at a simple solution. What if instead of rewarding the robot for getting closer to the maze exit, they rewarded it for trying new and interesting directions? They found that this shift in programming significantly improved the robots’ ability to solve mazes — a successful result in 39 out of 40 trials, versus 3 out of 40. Testing objective-less challenges in many other AI contexts, Stanley got similar results. When made to seek novelty, his robots developed surprising and creative solutions to problems they could not previously solve.

 


Via The Learning Factor
rodrick rajive lal's insight:

A lesson on seeking novelty from…robots.: Rigid goals, rigid timelines, and rigid structures leave little scope for creative learning! I have come across educators who adhere to straight jacketed lesson plans and rigid marking schemes with the result that there learners become frustrated and fed up of the learning process! Experiential learning goes beyond rigid structures, thus one shoul never curb the freedom to arrive at prescribed goals, by imposing rigid instructions on learners! 

more...
Adele Taylor's curator insight, March 20, 5:08 PM

A lesson on seeking novelty from…robots.

Morgan Sams's curator insight, March 21, 12:40 PM

Objective Summary:

The generation were are in seeks the approval of others. If society was not focused on reward for moving closer to a goal, they could find more happiness in their lives, stated Kenneth Stanley. The human race needs to rewire their brains to accept reward when they try a new path. When made to seek novelty,  our society can develop surprising and creative solutions to problems we may not have been able to previously solve.

 

Reaction: 

Dr. Kenneth Stanley had very valid points throughout his article. If my generation of technology would slow down and rely on their minds rather than the internet, I feel as if we could be the next great generation. If we were rewarded for taking the lesser of the two pathes, rather than following what the person in front of us did, we could discover a new world of changes. 

 

Main Points:

1. Technology is going to corrupt society

2. Goals will help you reach your full potential 

3. Rewards can actually be a deficit 

4. Taking the path less travel can lead to great discoveries 

medicalcanastore's comment, March 23, 1:38 AM
http://medicalcanastore.com/
Rescooped by rodrick rajive lal from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
Scoop.it!

In the game of office politics sometimes you must sacrifice a pawn to become queen

In the game of office politics sometimes you must sacrifice a pawn to become queen | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

Many years ago, I applied for a promotion I desperately wanted. At the time, I was the highest performer in the department and so everyone, including me, unwisely expected the big fancy job to be mine. It wasn't. Despite going for three interviews and enduring one of those excruciating psychometric tests, I was duly informed my application had been unsuccessful. What was most intriguing, however, was the reason the executive gave for rejecting me:

"James," she said, "you need to realise that sometimes it's not how well you perform a job that matters; it's how well you understand office politics." She then proceeded to write down the name of a book on the topic, which I was required to obediently read before applying again in the future.


Via The Learning Factor
rodrick rajive lal's insight:

However harsh it may seem, the fact is that being the highest performer, doesn't guarantee you a coveted promotion! What matters in many cases is aptitude for office politics. To quote from the article, "sometimes it's not how well you perform a job that matters; it's how well you understand office politics." The unfortunate fact is that mollycodling and knowing when to switch sides and allegiance  are also important skill that can sometimes help you get that coveted promotion! Didn't get that promotion? It may be in your interests to follow the example of the politically astute who build the necessary networks.

more...
The Learning Factor's curator insight, February 7, 4:35 PM

Didn't get that promotion? It may be in your interests to follow the example of the politically astute who build the necessary networks.

HOME GIRAFFE's curator insight, February 7, 8:09 PM

This is a clever article on strategies that must often be employed.

Rescooped by rodrick rajive lal from Public Relations & Social Media Insight
Scoop.it!

5 Ways to Make Your Blog Post Interactive on the Cheap

5 Ways to Make Your Blog Post Interactive on the Cheap | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

Static marketing content is as outdated as print-only newspapers. Just as day-old newspapers become litter in the streets, static digital content is useless to the average reader. With such an inundation of static marketing content, one piece hardly stands out from others, meaning brands blend and ideas fade.

 

Readers crave the dynamic nature of interactive digital content. An ion Interactive studymeasured the success and general feeling from marketers regarding interactive content. In terms of effectiveness, 93% of marketers say interactive media is great at educating buyers; 88% say it’s effective at differentiating brands, whereas static was found to be only 55% effective. Not convinced yet? Did you know that interactive content also drives 2X more conversions than static content?

 

Despite these numbers, many marketers shy away from interactive content. It might be because it has a reputation for being expensive and labor-intensive. But that is an unfair reputation. Creating interactive elements is, in fact, easy, fast and even free....


Via Jeff Domansky
rodrick rajive lal's insight:

Five ways to make your blog post more engaging and interactive for readers from HubSpot.

more...
Jeff Domansky's curator insight, March 4, 10:16 AM

Five ways to make your blog post more engaging and interactive for readers from HubSpot.

aitouaddaC's curator insight, March 6, 3:55 AM

Five ways to make your blog post more engaging and interactive for readers from HubSpot.

Rescooped by rodrick rajive lal from Public Relations & Social Media Insight
Scoop.it!

Surprising Punctuation Habits of Famous Authors, Visualized

Surprising Punctuation Habits of Famous Authors, Visualized | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

Hemingway actually used denser punctuation than Jane Austen, William Faulkner, or Charles Dickens.and the way they use punctuation. Yet how much can the way authors use punctuation really reveal about their style? 

 

Plenty, it turns out.Over on Medium, Adam Calhoun decided to strip eight of his favorite novels down to just the punctuation. The novels he chose were James Joyce'sUlysses, Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice, Mark Twain's Huckleberry Finn, Charles Dickens's Great Expectations, Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, Cormac McCarthy's Blood Meridian, Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland, Ernest Hemingway's A Farewell to Arms, and William Faulkner's Absalom! Absalom!...


Via Jeff Domansky
rodrick rajive lal's insight:

That the use of punctuation marks defines the author is something interesting but a well known fact. The use of long sentences, often running into entire paragraphs was distinctive to Ernest Hemingway. Of special importance is the use of punctuation marks in stream of consciousness novels. It is profoundly encouraging to know that people still feel that punctuation marks continue to be importance even in times when we are veering away from fixed rules of grammar and conventions. However to experiment with punctuation marks requires one to be well versed with the rules. Writers are today experimenting with hyphens instead of commas as the hyphen suggests a deepep pause than the comma, and it is visually more appealing. In times when the visual impact is more sought after, the presence of puntuation marks, especially the exclammation mark, the hyphen, and the semi-colon is on the increase, while the comma takes a back seat. It is interesting to see how the English language is evolving from a perceived, nuanced and subtly styled language into a more visual and upfront language.

more...
Jeff Domansky's curator insight, February 29, 10:38 AM

Writers alert! A fascinating analysis of writers and their punctuation habits. Recommended reading. 9/10

Antonio Ormachea's curator insight, March 3, 2:38 PM

Writers alert! A fascinating analysis of writers and their punctuation habits. Recommended reading. 9/10

Rescooped by rodrick rajive lal from Technology in Business Today
Scoop.it!

Virtual reality is 'the next platform' for social experiences, says Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg

Virtual reality is 'the next platform' for social experiences, says Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it
The Facebook chief said we’re entering a world where most of what we share will be video.

Via TechinBiz
rodrick rajive lal's insight:

Virtual reality, or enhanced reality is indeed the future of information technology. What makes enhanced reality the need of the hour is the that it provides for a more realistic experience. Everyone of us has experienced the impact of 3D effects while watching a movie, or for that effect, the 5D experience, where the senses are stimulated not simply by visual stimulus, but also auditory, sensory, and olfactory ones too! So if Facebook and other social networking sites can make social interactions more realistic, then, surely it would get them more users!

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by rodrick rajive lal from Public Relations & Social Media Insight
Scoop.it!

Design School's Ultimate Guide to Designing With Backgrounds [With Ready-to-Use Templates]

Design School's Ultimate Guide to Designing With Backgrounds [With Ready-to-Use Templates] | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

In order to arrange your design, you need a place to start. Backgrounds are the foundation of your graphics — it helps pave the path to forming a successful composition.


Textures and colors help create depth and contrast, allowing your graphics to stand out and get noticed. Well composed images can help create space for you to overlay text, while visually communicating your message at the same time.


Using a background can help give your designs more context and provide a visual element to help support your content.


Bonus: We’ve designed most of the images in this article as templates for you to personalize! To use them for your own stuff, just click them and they’ll be ready to edit in your Canva account (No Canva? It’s free!). 


Via Jeff Domansky
rodrick rajive lal's insight:
The post contains some interesting design tips on working with backgrounds with some ready-to-use templates thrown in!
more...
Jeff Domansky's curator insight, April 21, 12:07 PM

Blogging or designing visuals? Learn these background design tips to make your message pop.

Rescooped by rodrick rajive lal from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
Scoop.it!

5 Ways To Experience Flow And Get Crazy Productive - Forbes

5 Ways To Experience Flow And Get Crazy Productive - Forbes | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

The average person has 70,000 thoughts each day, and if you don’t learn to organize them, they have the potential to wreak havoc on your productivity.

 

When you succumb to the flurry of thoughts running through your head, your mind becomes disorganized, and the more you ruminate on intrusive thoughts, the more power you give them.

Most of our thoughts are just that—thoughts, not facts. When you find yourself believing the negative, distracting, and pessimistic things your inner voice says, it’s very hard to slow down the momentum of your thoughts.


Via The Learning Factor
rodrick rajive lal's insight:
One has an average of 70,000 thoughts in a day, and to handle all of them is a challenge indeed! In the context of the busy and hectic lives we lead, it is important to be in the flow, as being overwhelmed by thoughts and issues can add up to stress. While it is difficult to slow down time one can atleast try to organise the flow of thoughts. This is an interesting write-up that will help you organise yourself in these hectic and busy times. Organising thoughts in a to-do diary will help a great deal!
more...
Helen Teague's curator insight, April 20, 1:35 PM
Share your insight
Adele Taylor's curator insight, April 20, 8:54 PM
Gives a new meaning to staying focused...
Walter Gassenferth's curator insight, April 21, 7:09 AM
Very interesting subject to be considered and discussed. I will disclose the post to my contacts and subscribers in http://www.quanticaconsultoria.com
Rescooped by rodrick rajive lal from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
Scoop.it!

Why Criticism Is So Tough To Swallow (And How To Make It Go Down Easier)

Why Criticism Is So Tough To Swallow (And How To Make It Go Down Easier) | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it
What Your Brain Does When You're Criticised

 

At any given time, brains are subconsciously scanning the world around us for dangers to defend against—ready to launch a fight, flight, or freeze response that will protect us from predators or poisons. But the brain doesn’t just guard us against physical threats. Research has found that it also goes on the defensive in response to things that threaten to undermine our social standing and safety, including interactions that make us feel even mildly rejected or incompetent. Since even being glanced at askance by a stranger can be enough to trigger our defenses, you can bet that receiving critical feedback is pretty likely to spark a fight, flight, or freeze response.


Via The Learning Factor
rodrick rajive lal's insight:
Criticism is so tough to swallow, apparently because our brains perceive criticism as a danger and so it gets into defensive mode! A few of the senior at the place where I work tell others to learn to accept vulnerability without being defensive. Most of the workshops conducted for employees revolve around making them feel comfortable with vulnerabilty. This, I guess is the first step towards accepting criticism without feeling threatened. Being comfortable with vulnerability depends, also to a great extent on developing  a secure environment.
more...
The Learning Factor's curator insight, April 17, 8:39 PM

We're used to giving "praise sandwiches" a criticism wedged in between two generic complimentsthat give our brains indigestion.

Adele Taylor's curator insight, April 18, 5:49 PM
Definitely worth a read, if you ever have to provide feedback!
resortsindelhi's comment, April 22, 6:34 AM
<a href="http://raftingcamps.in/jungle-camps.php">Jungle Camps in Rishikesh</a>
Rescooped by rodrick rajive lal from Public Relations & Social Media Insight
Scoop.it!

How to Tell a Great Story

How to Tell a Great Story | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

We tell stories to our coworkers and peers all the time — to persuade someone to support our project, to explain to an employee how he might improve, or to inspire a team that is facing challenges. It’s an essential skill, but what makes a compelling story in a business context? And how can you improve your ability to tell stories that persuade?


What the Experts Say


In our information-saturated age, business leaders “won’t be heard unless they’re telling stories,” says Nick Morgan, author of Power Cues and president and founder of Public Words, a communications consulting firm. “Facts and figures and all the rational things that we think are important in the business world actually don’t stick in our minds at all,” he says.


But stories create “sticky” memories by attaching emotions to things that happen. That means leaders who can create and share good stories have a powerful advantage over others. And fortunately, everyone has the ability to become a better storyteller.


“We are programmed through our evolutionary biology to be both consumers and creators of story,” says Jonah Sachs, CEO of Free Range Studios and author of Winning the Story Wars. “It certainly can be taught and learned.” Here’s how to use storytelling to your benefit....


Via Jeff Domansky
rodrick rajive lal's insight:
The subheading states it so succintly -  you can't fix culture, a culture that gives much importance to the story-telling culture! This Harvard Business Review article suggests what is obvious. Tell the story and the rest will follow. Nothing beats the compelling power of a story told really well. The most popular story is the story of success! If you are a successful entrepreneur, then tell them the story of your success and the "rest will surely follow"! Stories also promote loyalty among employees, thus to gain a following, to persuade people to follow your ideology, you need to tell them a compelling story! The art of persuasion deals greatly in your skills in story-telling!
more...
Jeff Domansky's curator insight, April 9, 3:00 AM

Storytelling is a skill every leader needs to master.

Arpita Seth's curator insight, April 11, 11:57 PM
hotels in lucknow http://www.hotelmyriad.in/
Rescooped by rodrick rajive lal from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
Scoop.it!

Stop Wasting Your Employees’ Time

Stop Wasting Your Employees’ Time | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

Not so long ago, the idea that an employee could connect anytime, anywhere, was seen as a revolution in work–life balance. You could get home in time for dinner or go on vacation even when a project was at a critical point. Your smartphone could turn wherever you were into your mobile office.

But now many believe this unlimited connectivity has gone too far. Studies have concluded that late-night smartphone use has an adverse effect on employee productivity and engagement. A growing number of companies, such as Volkswagen and Atos, have enacted email policies intended to mandate unplugging. An agreement in April 2014 between French employers and unions created an “obligation to disconnect” for contract workers to ensure that they don’t burn out, and Germany is currently considering legislation that would ban communication from employers to their workers after hours.


Via The Learning Factor
rodrick rajive lal's insight:
The idea of being connected to the organisation 24X7 via whats app, or e-mail often results in a sense of being monitored by big brother. The idea of connecting to employees all the time has begun to rankle many. Jennifer has rightly pointed out that 'what appeared to be a revolution in work-life balance has gone too far'! Research has shown that late night smartphone use has an adverse impact on 'employee productivity and engagement! Some of the well know organisations like Volkswagen have even enacted mandates for unplugging. Isn't it high time so called efficient organisations desisted from pestering employees with late night messages, and even messages on holidays? French employers and unions have even created an 'obligation to disconnect' for contract workers, isn't it high time others did the same too? The stress resulting from excess connectivity and the anxiety factor that leads to reduced employee productivity is simply not worth it! I have known of organisations that make it mandatory for their employees to switch their data service on so that they can receive whats app messages the moment they step into the organisation, others make it mandatory for their employees to keep their whats app on at all times. Similarly the shift from the good old written circular to the e-mail soft copy form has made it convenient to deny receiving a mail, or for that effect easier to blame the employee of negligence in checking a mail that was sent earlier. What makes it worse is that it is easier to miss an e-mail that forms part of a hundred mails than a hard copy of the same communication for which you have signed an acknowledgement!
more...
The Learning Factor's curator insight, April 7, 7:00 PM

Smartphones are not the problem—it’s bad management that people resent.

Rescooped by rodrick rajive lal from Writing about Life in the digital age
Scoop.it!

Want to be a better leader? Observe more and react less | McKinsey & Company

Want to be a better leader? Observe more and react less | McKinsey & Company | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

Most time-strapped executives know they should plan ahead and prioritize, focus on the important as much as the urgent, invest in their health (including getting enough sleep), make time for family and relationships, and limit (even if they don’t entirely avoid) mindless escapism. But doing this is easier said than done, as we all know—and as I, too, have learned during years of trying unsuccessfully to boost my effectiveness.

In my case, I stumbled upon an ancient meditation technique that, to my surprise, improved my mind’s ability to better resist the typical temptations that get in the way of developing productive and healthy habits. Much in the same way that intense, focused physical activity serves to energize and revitalize the body during the rest of the day, meditation is for me—and for the many other people who use it—like a mental aerobic exercise that declutters and detoxifies the mind to enhance its metabolic activity.


Via The Learning Factor, rodrick rajive lal
rodrick rajive lal's insight:
Manish states very clearrly that it is not a good idea to react immediately to e-mails and make immediate decisions. Sometimes it is better to 'sleep over' over the problem! Taking a vacations before making a decision might help too!
more...
http://neistersen.com.tr/kategori/emlak/?kat1=45 Emlak İlanları, Emlak, Emlak Ankara's comment, April 5, 7:12 AM
http://neistersen.com.tr/kategori/emlak/?kat1=45 emlak, emlak ilanları, emlak siteleri, emlak konut, emlakçı, emlakçı siteleri, emlakçı ankara, emlak sitesi, satılık emlak, emlak ankara, emlak ilan, emlak ilanları ankara, emlak ilan siteleri, emlak ilanı ver, emlak ilanı, emlak ilan sitesi, en iyi emlak sitesi, emlak ofisi, ücretsiz emlak ilan siteleri, emlak fiyatları, emlak satış, emlak portalı, emlak firmaları, ücretsiz emlak siteleri
http://neistersen.com.tr/kategori/emlak/?kat1=45
Ines Bieler's curator insight, April 5, 8:42 AM

Overloaded executives need coping mechanisms. This personal reflection shows how meditation can help.

rodrick rajive lal's curator insight, April 7, 2:28 AM
Manish has writtern a wonderful article that suggests how one can be a better leader. While the adage, observe more react less is true, the means of doing this would require not reacting immediately, or even postponing decision making for another day. Meditating, relaxing by taking a break, and I guess 'sleepiong over the problem could be a great help.  It has been noticed that knee-jerk reactions to e-mails and other correspondences might cause more harm than good!
Rescooped by rodrick rajive lal from Public Relations & Social Media Insight
Scoop.it!

“Super Verbs” Add Power & Persuasion to Your Copy - Marketing Words Blog

“Super Verbs” Add Power & Persuasion to Your Copy - Marketing Words Blog | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

Run or hustle? Eat or devour? Move or scurry? You can boost the power of your copy by amping up the quality of verbs you use.


Verbs show action, and the way you describe that motion can have a dramatic bearing on your readers. Why would you want to fill your copy with complacent words when you can conjure emotions and visual imagery in the hearts and minds of your readers?


Sure, “run” and “hustle” both indicate that someone is moving fast. But “run” is a dull, ordinary verb while “hustle” evokes definite images in your reader’s mind.Hadn’t really thought about it? You should!


You can choose commonplace verbs like “talk,” “make,” and “like,” or you can electrify your copy instead with verbs including “chatter,” “discover,” and “adore.”


Look at these examples to see what I mean....


Via Jeff Domansky
rodrick rajive lal's insight:

Want to add power & persuasion to your copy? Move beyond ordinary verbs to Super Verbs! Super verbs arepersuasive and more effective than their more passive brothers and sisters according to this article. You can see the difference between run and hustle, or even tell or inform.

more...
David Stapleton's curator insight, March 30, 4:20 PM

Want to add power & persuasion to your copy? Move beyond ordinary verbs to Super Verbs!

vicky stone's curator insight, April 1, 1:31 AM

Want to add power & persuasion to your copy? Move beyond ordinary verbs to Super Verbs!

Mike Allen's curator insight, April 2, 9:01 AM

Want to add power & persuasion to your copy? Move beyond ordinary verbs to Super Verbs!

Rescooped by rodrick rajive lal from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
Scoop.it!

How To Change Someone's Mind, According To Science

How To Change Someone's Mind, According To Science | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

Belief change is a war of attrition. There's usually no one argument that can suddenly get someone to see the light.

 

Changing someone's mind about a high-stakes position is a challenge many of us confront. Maybe your customers have preconceived ideas about your brand or products that you'd like to influence, or perhaps upper management is leaning toward a decision that you disagree with. In order to get someone to reconsider their views, it's important to understand the role of coherence in supporting beliefs.

 

Going back to the 1950s, psychologists have recognized the interplay among different aspects of knowledge that influence our overall set of beliefs. Building off that research, the cognitive scientist Paul Thagard has more recently put forth the concept of "explanatory coherence."

 


Via The Learning Factor
rodrick rajive lal's insight:

"Psychologically speaking, changing someone's mind is pretty difficult, even when you don't have politics to factor in." This is a very powerful aritcle that addresses an issue most of us will have faced in our careers and social life. It is simply difficult to change minds overnight, let alon instantly. When I shifted from a school that dealt with traditional pedagogy to one that was one of the pioneers in experiential pedagogy, I simply couldn't take it! The adage, 'unlearn everything' to learn something new, did not work with me for a whole six months! It took about two years finally to make me understand that experiential pedagogy does work, and that students will get to the end point on their own, provided they are given subtle cues and hints. It takes skill and science to convince people to change overnight, and just telling them to 'unlearn everything' might not be a good idea! What matters is to 'sow incoherence', make people feel worse about their current beliefs, supply them with information from different sources that support a change in their beliefs, and yes what matters is to 'address their emotional attachment to what they believe.' It is only then that you might be able to bring about a change in someone's mind! 

more...
Claudia Pinto Basto's curator insight, March 30, 3:53 AM

Psychologically speaking, changing someone's mind is pretty difficult, even when you don't have politics to factor in.

Terence R. Egan's curator insight, March 31, 1:03 AM

Psychologically speaking, changing someone's mind is pretty difficult, even when you don't have politics to factor in.

Walter Gassenferth's curator insight, March 31, 8:21 AM

Psychologically speaking, changing someone's mind is pretty difficult, even when you don't have politics to factor in.

For those who speak Portuguese or Spanish, more about people management can be read in http://www.quanticaconsultoria.com

Rescooped by rodrick rajive lal from Public Relations & Social Media Insight
Scoop.it!

What Can The Presidential Candidates Teach Us About Social Marketing?

What Can The Presidential Candidates Teach Us About Social Marketing? | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

To run for president, you need to possess a certain je ne sais quoi when it comes to communicating messages that can provoke people to take action.

So regardless of which side of the aisle you sit on, your brand can take a lesson from each of the master marketers who remain in the race. The candidates clearly know how to engage their base.

Below are some of the top strategies and tactics of Decision 2016, which can be applied easily to your organization’s social channels to gain traction and win over some very loyal constituents....


Via Jeff Domansky
rodrick rajive lal's insight:

There is so much to learn from the US Presidential candidates especially  about effective social marketing strategies. Brand promoters  can learn a lot about  how to pitch their ideas, more effectively!

more...
John Grant's curator insight, March 19, 2:54 PM

Interesting marketing lessons from political candidates.

Antonio Ormachea's curator insight, March 20, 11:07 AM

Interesting marketing lessons from political candidates.

Mike Allen's curator insight, March 26, 4:53 AM

Interesting marketing lessons from political candidates.

Scooped by rodrick rajive lal
Scoop.it!

10 SEO strategies that will work in 2016

10 SEO strategies that will work in 2016 | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it
Good digital marketers must consistently adapt their strategies in order to remain effective. Here are 10 SEO strategies that will help you succeed in 2016.
rodrick rajive lal's insight:
Key-words, are important to boost clicks, but then that is not all! The article gives an insight into what draws more viewers to your website or even blog. The ten strategies listed in the article will no doubt help boost your SEO values. Today more than ever, it is important to post relevant and viable content in your website or blog. In times when more and more of sales take place online, it is important to showcase your content in such a way that it draws more view. Key-words are just the icing on the cake, what matters is consistency and long term relevance.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by rodrick rajive lal from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
Scoop.it!

The Best Leaders Allow Themselves to Be Persuaded

The Best Leaders Allow Themselves to Be Persuaded | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

When we think of great leaders, certain characteristics come to mind: They have confidence in their abilities and conviction in their beliefs. They “trust their gut,” “stay the course,” and “prove others wrong.” They aren’t “pushovers,” and they certainly don’t “flip-flop.” But this archetype is terribly outdated. Having spent three years studying many of the world’s most successful leaders for my new book, Persuadable, I’ve learned one surprising thing they have in common: a willingness to be persuaded.

Alan Mulally, the vaunted CEO who saved Ford Motor Company, is, for example, exceptionally skeptical of his own opinions. Ray Dalio, one of the world’s most successful hedge fund managers, insists that his team ruthlessly second-guess his thinking. Christine Lagarde, managing director of the IMF, seeks out information that might disprove her beliefs about the world and herself. In our increasingly complex world, these leaders have realized that the ability to consider emerging evidence and change their minds accordingly provides extraordinary advantages.


Via The Learning Factor
rodrick rajive lal's insight:

The best Leaders allow themselves to be persuaded, especially for the big decisions!

more...
Disera Doss's curator insight, March 8, 7:51 AM

The best Leaders allow themselves to be persuaded, especially for the big decisions!

MindShare HR's curator insight, March 10, 2:24 AM

The best Leaders allow themselves to be persuaded, especially for the big decisions!

Dané Davis's curator insight, March 10, 5:48 PM

The best Leaders allow themselves to be persuaded, especially for the big decisions!

Rescooped by rodrick rajive lal from Technology in Business Today
Scoop.it!

6 ways to unleash Creativity in the Workplace

6 ways to unleash Creativity in the Workplace | Writing about Life in the digital age | Scoop.it

The demand for creativity from employees is rising in this age of rapid technological advancement. This is evident when we see multinational companies like


Via TechinBiz
rodrick rajive lal's insight:

It is very good to claim to support creativity at the workplace, however this needs to be done within a structure that allows for creativity to take place. The other day we were discussing how structures and processes might end up as being detrimental to creativity. In fact, sometimes to state that one is 'planning for creativity' is an oxymoron when the planning phase becomes extreme! The 'Eureka' moment comes unbidden and at the most unexpected of moments!

more...
No comment yet.