Scriveners' Trapp...
Follow
Find tag "Amazon"
31.2K views | +2 today
Scriveners' Trappings
Aids and resources for creators and teachers of writing, interactive fiction, digital stories, and transmedia
Curated by Jim Lerman
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Jim Lerman from 21st Century skills of critical and creative thinking
Scoop.it!

How to Use Foreshadowing - Helping Writers Become Authors - Writing Rightly

How to Use Foreshadowing - Helping Writers Become Authors - Writing Rightly | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
If we sift foreshadowing down to its simplest form, we could say it prepares readers for what will happen later in the story.

Via Penelope, Lynnette Van Dyke
more...
Penelope's curator insight, January 14, 2014 12:35 AM

 

We hear lots about point of view, plot and climax, but what about foreshadowing? This very important element of a story seems to have been relegated to a back room and stuffed in the closet.

 

In its simplest form? It prepares readers for what will happen in the story. I'm sure you've read books where at the point of a major plot twist, you shake your head and say, huh? We all have. You feel cheated and want to snap that book shut!

 

There are two parts:

 

Part 1: The Plant    (Blantant or Subtle Hints)

Part 2: The Payoff (Important Scenes Play Out)

 

Foreshadowing can ease readers into what is going to happen. Sneak it in like pureed veggies, but don't hit readers over the head with it. This way, when you execute your plot twist, your readers will be delighted--not disgusted.

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article: http://www.helpingwritersbecomeauthors.com/2013/04/how-to-use-foreshadowing.html

Rescooped by Jim Lerman from Writing Rightly
Scoop.it!

10 Tips For Writing Endings To Your Story - Writing Rightly

10 Tips For Writing Endings To Your Story - Writing Rightly | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

"Always keep in mind what is expected in the genre you’re writing. If you’re writing a category romance, then the hero and heroine must unite at the end."


Penelope Silver's insight


"Writing endings for our stories could be the easiest thing in the world or the hardest. The best way to begin is to ponder on what kind of ending is expected for the genre in which you are writing. If you are writing a category romance, readers are going to expect the love interests to finally get together and have a happy ending. There have been exceptions (Romeo and Juliet or Love Story). If you are a reader anticipating a romantic story and happy ending, do you want to read a tragic ending? I don't.

 

"The 10 tips presented should give you a great beginning to write your own ending. Check out the article for all the details.

 

1. Always keep in mind what is EXPECTED in the genre.

2. Avoid the dreaded DEUX EX MACHINE (gods taking care of it).

3. Think APPROPRIATE ending rather than satisfying ending. 
4. NO MISERABLE ENDINGS for characters to no real purpose
5. Struggling? Compose an EVENT. Bring most characters together
6. REALLY struggling—go back to the BEGINNING.
7. When the story is over—STOP.
8. BEWARE of TOO MUCH BUILD UP with too quick a resolution.
9. No need to tie up every little plot string, but TIE UP MOST of them
10. EPILOGS: I kind of like them (peek into the future)"

 

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article:http://debravega.wordpress.com/2013/08/18/10-tips-for-writing-endings-to-your-story/


Via Full Coverage Writers, Penelope
more...
Penelope's curator insight, August 23, 2013 4:07 PM

 

Writing endings for our stories could be the easiest thing in the world or the hardest. The best way to begin is to ponder on what kind of ending is expected for the genre in which you are writing. If you are writing a category romance, readers are going to expect the love interests to finally get together and have a happy ending. There have been exceptions (Romeo and Juliet or Love Story). If you are a reader anticipating a romantic story and happy ending, do you want to read a tragic ending? I don't.

 

The 10 tips presented should give you a great beginning to write your own ending. Check out the article for all the details.

 

1. Always keep in mind what is EXPECTED in the genre.

2. Avoid the dreaded DEUX EX MACHINE (gods taking care of it).

3. Think APPROPRIATE ending rather than satisfying ending.
4. NO MISERABLE ENDINGS for characters to no real purpose
5. Struggling? Compose an EVENT. Bring most characters together
6. REALLY struggling—go back to the BEGINNING.
7. When the story is over—STOP.
8. BEWARE of TOO MUCH BUILD UP with too quick a resolution.
9. No need to tie up every little plot string, but TIE UP MOST of them
10. EPILOGS: I kind of like them (peek into the future)

 

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article: http://debravega.wordpress.com/2013/08/18/10-tips-for-writing-endings-to-your-story/

 

 

 

Kimberley Vico's curator insight, August 24, 2013 12:40 AM

Like a strong beginning, you ought to have a good ending ~ in any story!  Give it a try...!

Rescooped by Jim Lerman from Writing Rightly
Scoop.it!

Resources for Writers: Tips for Writing Effective Dialogue

Resources for Writers: Tips for Writing Effective Dialogue | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

Via Penelope
more...
Penelope's curator insight, May 21, 2013 12:15 AM

 

Yackety Yak. Blah Blah Blah. We talk every day and in every way. Is it always effective talking? Not really. But when it comes to our writing of dialogue inside of our stories, it better be.

 

When a writer goes on for a page or two or three describing what kind of coffee a character is going to order at the cafe, my eyes start to roll back in my head, and I am more than likely to slam the door on that story.

 

Dialogue is war! If you write dialogue--make it tight--and make it right! Make sure it is going to advance your story. I am still basking in the "afterglow" of all of the wonderful dialogue and storytelling from the remake of the "Great Gatsby" movie. Ah, but that is a post for another day.

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article: http://jodierennerediting.blogspot.com/2010/08/tips-for-writing-effective-dialogue.html

 

 

Jacques Goyette's curator insight, May 21, 2013 3:13 PM

very instructive advice. De bons conseils pour écrire des dialogues réalistes.

Penelope's comment, May 21, 2013 3:17 PM
Merci'!
Rescooped by Jim Lerman from Writing Rightly
Scoop.it!

Elementary Writing Prompts - Writing Rightly

Elementary Writing Prompts - Writing Rightly | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
These elementary writing prompts are great for getting the students writing, in a non-pressurized, fun way.


Penelope Silver's insight


"Sometimes we all need a little push to get going on a writing spree. Students are just beginning their writing journey, so this article could be a big help for teachers. It gives 52 Elementary Writing Prompts--one for every week of the year--to get their little fingers flying.

 

"I shared it because there are also some great story prompts here for adults. I believe these could be used to jog our memories about certain events in our lives. It just may lead to a short story, and then possibly a book!

 

"Have fun with them, let your imagination run wild, and see where it takes you!"

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article:http://www.journalinghelps.com/Elementary-Writing-Prompts.html


Via Penelope
more...
Penelope's curator insight, August 27, 2013 11:35 PM

 

Sometimes we all need a little push to get going on a writing spree. Students are just beginning their writing journey, so this article could be a big help for teachers. It gives 52 Elementary Writing Prompts--one for every week of the year--to get their little fingers flying.

 

I shared it because there are also some great story prompts here for adults. I believe these could be used to jog our memories about certain events in our lives. It just may lead to a short story, and then possibly a book!

 

Have fun with them, let your imagination run wild, and see where it takes you!

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article: http://www.journalinghelps.com/Elementary-Writing-Prompts.html

Rescooped by Jim Lerman from Writing Rightly
Scoop.it!

Using Dragon Naturally Speaking to Increase Productivity | Writing Tools

Using Dragon Naturally Speaking to Increase Productivity | Writing Tools | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

"Authors are pressed for time. What if we could "dictate" our novels instead of typing them?"


Via Penelope
more...
Penelope's curator insight, July 3, 2013 11:31 AM

 

This post is very timely, as I have been considering making the switch from Word to Scrivener, and from typing to dictating.

 

This author is finding her voice with the software, "Dragon Naturally Speaking", and she gives us some very compelling reasons to try it out. Number 1? INCREASED PRODUCTIVITY.

 

She started out small with dictating e-mails and blog posts, and then gave it a shot for dictating the first draft of a novel. Her article gives us a peek into her process. Fascinating.

 

You can find this software on Amazon, and can get started with the home version to try it out.

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article: http://writing4success.com/blog/using-dragon-naturally-speaking-to-increase-productivity/

Rescooped by Jim Lerman from SOCIAL MEDIA, what we think about!
Scoop.it!

5 Ways Writers Can Break Out of the Tired Old Social Media Box

5 Ways Writers Can Break Out of the Tired Old Social Media Box | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

The social media world is changing daily. In other words, we must be alert and aware of the new tools that could support us in our approach. This interesting article speaks about some "new" tools that can also help us to go towards to success. [note Martin Gysler]

 

It’s time to teach that old dog some new tricks.

 

That old dog I’m referring to is social media.

 

Sure, you’re already blogging, and on Twitter, LinkedIn, Google+, Facebook, and more. Great.

 

But I’m telling you — there’s more to social media than meets the eye. The final chapter on social media hasn’t been written.

 

When I kicked off my writing business in April, I decided to use social media my way.

 

I approached these overused networks as if I’d never heard of them. I made my own rules. I set different expectations. You could say I wrote my own chapter on social media marketing.

 

Read more: http://www.copyblogger.com/creative-social-media/


Via Martin Gysler
more...
No comment yet.