Scriveners' Trappings
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Scriveners' Trappings
Aids and resources for creators and teachers of writing, interactive fiction, digital stories, and transmedia
Curated by Jim Lerman
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The Shapes of Stories

The Shapes of Stories | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

Via Gregg Morris, Dennis T OConnor
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kenekaplan's curator insight, January 19, 2013 7:26 PM

And video of Kurt Vonnegut at the chalkboard http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oP3c1h8v2ZQ

Angela Antle's comment, January 30, 2013 8:15 AM
Fun graphic of most effective story shapes
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Idaho - English Language Arts Tool Box

Idaho - English Language Arts Tool Box | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

Idaho developed Common Core toolboxes for English langauge arts and mathematics.

 

Each toolbox provides an overview of the standards, instructional materials and resources, and information on the new assessments.

 

Embedded are links to videos and reports to assist educators and the public in better understanding the standards.


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Demystifying "the Process of Meaning Making" and Close Reading | Burkins & Yaris

Demystifying "the Process of Meaning Making" and Close Reading | Burkins & Yaris | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

In this post, we present Vicky Vinton and Dorothy Barnhouse's book What Readers Really Do as one of our highly recommended text for learning what it means to read closely.


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Twitter Storytelling: See Tweets Transformed Into Haunting Works Of Art | Fast Company

Twitter Storytelling: See Tweets Transformed Into Haunting Works Of Art | Fast Company | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

By Paula Bernstein

 

Every tweet may contain a story. But in 140 characters or less, tweets can only hint at drama, romance, tragedy, and intrigue.Artists Nate Larson and Marni Shindelman take the story one step further into the real world, adding a visual component to.tweets in their "Geolocation" project.

 

"Using publicly available GPS metadata in Twitter posts, the duo track the location of tweets and take photographs, creating a real-world context for the virtual information. They then pair the photograph with the tweet, often to powerful effect."

 

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Sarah McElrath's curator insight, January 23, 2013 8:36 AM

Shows lack of privacy in this digital age.

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Two Views of Writing: Woody Allen and John McPhee

Two Views of Writing: Woody Allen and John McPhee | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

"...As I was watching it, I was reminded of an article I had just read in The New Yorker by John McPhee, who writes about how he writes in a piece called “Structure.” (I think it is part of the paid archive now, so may want to go to your local library — you still have one, right? — to check it out). McPhee brings us right into his whole planning and writing of longer non-fiction pieces, showing off visual structures of his content. You can see charts, and maps, and visual puzzles that form the backbone of his pieces. His larger message is try to move away from chronological sequencing, and instead, find new ways to structure content in a piece of writing. But that requires considerable thinking, planning … and an understanding of structure...."


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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, January 15, 2013 4:12 PM

If you're looking for good examples of voice,  read this article! 

Sarah McElrath's curator insight, February 1, 2013 7:23 AM

Interesting use of technology to help structure your writing. Also points out that everyone's writing process is different.

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Why Write Your Own Book When An Algorithm Can Do It For You?

Why Write Your Own Book When An Algorithm Can Do It For You? | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

By Adam Popescu

 

"Phil Parker is unlike any writer you've ever met - or read for that matter. That's because he doesn't write most of his books. Instead, the trained economist uses sophisticated algorithms that can pen a whole book from start to finish in as little as a few minutes. The secret is sophisticated programming mimicking the thought process behind formulaic writing. It can take years to create these programs, but once completed, new books can be churned out in minutes."

Jim Lerman's insight:

A virtual lollipop to whoever can identify the image for this post. Any takers?

If you know the answer, it means you're of a "certain age."

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Sarah McElrath's curator insight, January 23, 2013 8:48 AM

Hmm, does this count as art?

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Illustrated Six-Word Memoirs by Students from Grade School to Grad School

Illustrated Six-Word Memoirs by Students from Grade School to Grad School | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

By Maria Popova

 

:In 2006, Larry Smith presented a challenge to his community at SMITH Magazine: How would you tell your life’s story if you could only use six words? The question, inspired by the legend that Hemingway was once challenged to write an entire novel in just six words, spurred a flurry of responses — funny, heartbreaking, moving, somewhere between PostSecret and Félix Fénéon’s three-word reports. The small experiment soon became a global phenomenon, producing a series of books and inspiring millions of people to contemplate the deepest complexities of existence through the simplicity of short-form minimalism. The latest addition to the series, Things Don’t Have To Be Complicated: Illustrated Six-Word Memoirs by Students Making Sense of the World, comes from TEDBooks and collects dozens of visual six-word autobiographies from students between the ages of 8 and 35."

 

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Sarah McElrath's curator insight, January 23, 2013 8:44 AM

We do a lot with six-word memoirs in school. This is great to show as examples.

Rescooped by Jim Lerman from Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks
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Writer Unboxed » Why Are We Wired for Story?

Writer Unboxed » Why Are We Wired for Story? | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

Lisa Cron#s book, Wired for Story: The Writer’s Guide to Using Brain Science to Hook Readers from the Very First Sentence ...

 

First, the mistaken belief: From time immemorial we’ve have been taught that things like lyrical language, insightful metaphors, vivid description, memorable characters, palpable sensory details and a fresh voice are what hooks readers.

It’s a seductive belief, because all those things are indisputably good. But they’re notwhat hook the reader. The brain, it turns out, is far less picky when it comes pretty prose than we’ve been led to believe.

What does the brain crave? Beginning with the very first sentence, the brain craves a sense of urgency that instantly makes us want to know what happens next. It’s a visceral feeling that seduces us into leaving the real world behind and surrendering to the world of the story.

Which brings us to the real question: Why? What are we really looking for in every story we read? What is that sense of urgency all about?

Thanks to recent advances in neuroscience, these are questions that we can now begin to answer with the kind clarity that sheds light on the genuine purpose of story, and elevates writers to the most powerful people on earth. Because story, as it turns out, has a much deeper and more meaningful purpose than simply to entertain and delight.


Via Heiko Idensen
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Sarah McElrath's curator insight, January 23, 2013 8:39 AM

This dovetails with the Significant Objects book I read.

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New Web App Recommends Books Based on Your Tweets

New Web App Recommends Books Based on Your Tweets | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
BookRx is a simple and innovative tool to use if you're looking for interesting reading material. It uses your tweets to predict which books you will enjoy.

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Reading a book is a significant investment of time. That's why it's common to ask friends for recommendations when looking for interesting literature. If you haven't said it yourself, you've probably heard someone say the common refrain: "Read any good books lately?"

That method has worked fairly well thus far, but an innovative new web appsources recommendations from the person who knows you best — you.

Simply insert your Twitter handle into BookRx, and seconds later the app produces a list of categories and specific books you might enjoy. The app, which was launched yesterday, is a product of Northwestern University'sKnight Lab. Shawn O'Banion, a third-year PhD student, worked with his professor, Larry Birnbaum, to create BookRx.

 

 


 

“Twitter is really unique because it’s a stream of consciousness for the user," O'Banion tellsMashable.

“Twitter is really unique because it’s a stream of consciousness for the user," O'Banion tells Mashable. "Typically you’re projecting an image of yourself on Twitter with the things that you say; while that might not be your true self, it’s actually who you want to represent on social media.”

 
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Text Compactor: Free Online Automatic Text Summarization Tool

Text Compactor: Free Online Automatic Text Summarization Tool | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

Follow these simple steps to create a summary of your text.

Step 1Type or paste your text into the box. Step 2Drag the slider, or enter a number in the box, to set the percentage of text to keep in the summary. 

%

Step 3

Read your summarized text. If you would like a different summary, repeat Step 2. When you are happy with the summary, copy and paste the text into a word processor, or text to speech program, or language translation tool


Via Heiko Idensen
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Sarah McElrath's comment, January 23, 2013 8:43 AM
Great tool! Thanks for sharing.
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How Free Online Courses Are Changing the Traditional Liberal Arts Education | PBS NewsHour | Jan. 8, 2013

How Free Online Courses Are Changing the Traditional Liberal Arts Education | PBS NewsHour | Jan. 8, 2013 | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
As tuition costs continue to rise, it seems counterintuitive that professors at top universities would give away their courses for free.

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Keyboard Shortcuts for Google Docs | Google Gooru

Keyboard Shortcuts for Google Docs | Google Gooru | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
Google Gooru

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
Jim Lerman's insight:

Google Gooru is an excellent source for tutorials on how to use Google Apps.

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15 iPad Skills Every Teacher and Student should Have - Apps linked to your learning goals

15 iPad Skills Every Teacher and Student should Have - Apps linked to your learning goals | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

By Med Kharbach

 

"iPad has made such a radical change in education with more and more school districts  adopting it as a learning tool inside the classroom. Educational Technology and Mobile Learning  has been helping teachers all along the way with reviews and tutorials on how to get started using iPad in education. We have reviewed more than 500 apps and we are planning to do more reviews this year.

"Having accumulated a modest experience in dealing with educational iPad apps, we deem it important that we share with you some of the learning goals you should keep in mind when using iPad with your students. We have particularly associated sets of educational iPad apps with each learning goal to make it easier for you to achieve the targeted goal.

"Check the learning goals below and share with us your feedback. Enjoy"


Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Jynto's curator insight, January 12, 2013 3:47 AM

Great resource, clearly laid out. Does anyone have something similar for Android devices?  

 

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Creating a Classroom eBook with BookCreator

Creating a Classroom eBook with BookCreator | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
Tweet It is no secret that I am a fan of the iPad app BookCreator since its release in 2011. Our students have created several eBooks with the app. You can read about the creation, its process and ...

Via John Evans, Luciana Viter, Jim Lerman
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Christine Berthilier's curator insight, January 19, 2013 4:58 AM

Bookcreator je découvre cette application et je vais la tester

Marie Schoeman's curator insight, January 31, 2013 10:33 PM

An excellent tool for creating differentiated texts

 

Amber Ramshaw Wakefield's curator insight, February 26, 2013 1:34 PM

No more leaving a classroom to use the computer-take this with you and use your headphones!

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Junot Diaz on Creative Thinking: The Critical Self and Play - PsychCentral.com (blog)

Junot Diaz on Creative Thinking: The Critical Self and Play - PsychCentral.com (blog) | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

"Novelist Junot Díazis a Professor of Writing at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is “a writer whose finely crafted works of fiction offer powerful insight into the realities of the Caribbean diaspora, American assimilation, and lives lived between cultures.”

 

"New York Times writer Sam Anderson recently interviewed him, and Diaz provides a number of helpful perspectives on creative expression, for any kind of artist."


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Sarah McElrath's curator insight, January 23, 2013 9:06 AM

The difficulty lies in separating the editor from the creator.

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Grammarly Lite — Spellchecker Designed For The Web

Grammarly Lite — Spellchecker Designed For The Web | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Lynnette Van Dyke
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From product to process — The Storybird blog

From product to process — The Storybird blog | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

Via Grant Montgomery
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Designer Your Own Custom Branded Video Player with Flowplayer Designer

Designer Your Own Custom Branded Video Player with Flowplayer Designer | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

Via Robin Good
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Robin Good's curator insight, January 17, 2013 12:04 PM


The new FlowPlayer Designer allows you to design and customize the look and branding of your own video player and then it generates the code to embed it on your web site.


If you publish video clips that are not publicly hosted (as when they are published on YouTube) but reside on your own server or on cloud services like Amazon S3, then you must have a video player to serve your video content on your site or private membership site.


With Flowplayer Designer you can integrate your own company logo, select between nine pre-designed looks, control the colors of the individual elements of the player and set what controls are visible and available to the final viewer.


Free to use.


http://flowplayer.org/designer/



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5 Reasons why the iPad will stay the king of the classroom

5 Reasons why the iPad will stay the king of the classroom | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
Adam | Featured Articles, Teaching & Learning, Technology in Education, The Future of Education

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Elahe Amani's curator insight, January 16, 2013 12:14 AM

iPad will continue to play a more prominent role in classroom technology of k-16.

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Using Schoology and Collaboration to create student voice. | Where the Classroom Ends

Using Schoology and Collaboration to create student voice. | Where the Classroom Ends | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

Discuss as a class what this means about them, their writing style, etc.  Sort students into groups of three based upon varying style characteristics.  You will want to make sure that your small groups have three different types of student “voices.”

Now, the next step depends on what applications you already use in the classroom. You could use Edmodo or Wallwisher and modify the assignment for use in those programs.  I personally like Schoology the best.  Its resemblance to Facebook is a selling point for students and it’s so neat and tidy in organization that it makes it easy to construct separate discussion threads within the program.  This will take some outside of classroom time to set up this exercise.

Create a schoology account for yourself and have your students sign up for their own, as well.  For each class you create the program will create a code.  When students are creating their accounts they will need that “code” in order to sign up for our class.  When you’ve done all of the grunt work you/your students should see this:
...

You’ll want to click the discussion thread and create a discussion thread group for each group of three.  This means in each class you’ll probably have 10-15 discussion groups.  You will be given the choice for each group to upload directions as well.

The sky’s the limit.  If you teach AP students, use this exercise for voice in their AP analysis.  If you’re teaching the personal essay, give them a topic and then have them construct the response reply by reply by reply.  Of course, you won’t want to do this for the entirety of any essay, so choose an intro paragraph, a body paragraph, a conclusion, anything.

Since Schoology’s format is similar to the Facebook “wall” function, you can students in small groups reply to each other’s writing.   Have them consider that they can’t alter the line coming before theirs, they simply have to “add” to the previous line using their own writing style to inform the creation of this assignment.  When finished, have students type their replies into a new post for that discussion thread.  See the “dummy” example below.


Via Heiko Idensen
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Sarah McElrath's curator insight, January 23, 2013 8:50 AM

Voice being one of the hardest things to teach--this would be worth a try.

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William Gibson on Twitter, Antique Watches and Internet Obsessions | Underwire | Wired.com

William Gibson on Twitter, Antique Watches and Internet Obsessions | Underwire | Wired.com | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

For William Gibson, Twitter has taken the place of his previous obsession with antique watches.
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In Part 2 of the Wired interview, one of science fiction’s most singular voices — and one of its most compelling thinkers — discusses the internet, social media, his fascination with antique watches and punk rock, and his fear of nostalgia.

Wired: You’ve had some interesting thoughts about social media. You once said, “I was never interested in Facebook or Myspace because the environment seemed too top-down mediated. They feel like malls to me. But Twitter actually feels like the street. You can bump into anybody on Twitter.” Can you expand on that?
...


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Why 2012 was the year of the e-single

Why 2012 was the year of the e-single | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
E-singles -- stories somewhere between 5,000 and 30,000 words, usually nonfiction, and sold as inexpensive ebooks -- are the format for our time. Here's why.

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Critical Thinking

A look at some of the principles of critical thinking.

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, January 12, 2013 6:30 PM

Good plan if done well.

Rescooped by Jim Lerman from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
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Facebook Pages and Groups for Teachers

Facebook Pages and Groups for Teachers | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Free online tutorial for using DropBox

Free online tutorial for using DropBox | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
Free online Dropbox tutorial for teachers and students. TeacherTrainingVideos.com provides free step by step camtasia screencasts that take you through a whole range of ict and web2.0 tools

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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