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Scriveners' Trappings
Aids and resources for creators and teachers of writing, interactive fiction, digital stories, and transmedia
Curated by Jim Lerman
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Rescooped by Jim Lerman from Top sites for journalists
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TrustMedia

TrustMedia | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

From the site. "TrustMedia has a variety of training materials for journalists, from those who are new to the profession to veterans who want to expand or refresh their skills. Our collection of digital training manuals ranges from basic skills like reporting, writing and cultivating sources to new-media training, such as our guide for citizen journalists.These manuals provide information, case studies and tools to learn the basics or advanced skills of journalism."


Via helpingmedia
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Lynnette Van Dyke's comment, June 20, 2013 8:57 AM
Wonderful resource for writers. thank you.
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Future Journalism Project

Future Journalism Project | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

from the website

 

About the FJP

"The Future Journalism Project explores disruption, opportunity and innovation across the media landscape. We do this through a mix of original thinking and reporting, curation and the use of various platforms that best fit the type of content that we’re working with.

 

"To date, our most visible effort has been FJP Global, a blog that looks at media and technology issues from around the world, and FJP Latin America, a recently launched edition that focuses on what’s happening from Mexico to Tierra Del Fuego with additional attention paid to the Hispanic media in North America and developments in Spain.

About This Site

"On this site you’ll find interviews with — and articles by — people from the business, editorial, technology and educational sides of the industry. The primary themes we’re exploring are:

Journalism EducationJournalism Business ModelsJournalism Practice and TechnologyJournalism and Society"

- See more at: http://thefjp.org/about/#sthash.33dQgySP.dpuf

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Flowboard: Storytelling And Presentation App For iPad

Flowboard: Storytelling And Presentation App For iPad | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

Flowboard is a storytelling and presentation app that allows creating side-scrolling publications with the help of photos, videos, text and photo galleries. Whether you are looking to tell your story in the form of your personal photo collection, wish to share ideas or require creating and presenting a presentation right from your iPad, Flowboard can help you get the job done without requiring the use of PowerPoint or Keynote.


Via Baiba Svenca
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Baiba Svenca's curator insight, May 29, 2013 1:56 PM

I have scooped Flowboard before but I thought you may like to read this article about creating presentations on your iPad (iOS 6 or higher) where you will find some great tips for working with Flowboard.

The app is free of charge.

 

Sabina Viezzoli's comment, May 30, 2013 4:27 PM
Thank you Baiba!
Lucia Keijzer's curator insight, June 10, 2013 3:00 AM

This may be a fantastic way to get students into tale-telling.

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The Future Of Video Games Is Also The Future Of Storytelling | Forbes

The Future Of Video Games Is Also The Future Of Storytelling | Forbes | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

by Jordan Shapiro

 

"Upper One Games is the first indigenous owned video game company in the United States.

 

"Announced at the 2013 Games For Change Festival, the partnership between E-Line Media and Cook Inlet Tribal Council aims to make “meaningful and scalable social impact by creating world-class games and game-based learning infused with Alaska Native values and culture.”

 

"Their first consumer game will be a top line indie game to be released on major consoles. And Upper One Games is not holding back. They’ve handpicked top commercial talent who are excited to be working on games for impact."

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Cube Creator - writing prompts and story generator

Cube Creator - writing prompts and story generator | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

This interactive cube creator will help your students to start their own story writing. It breaks the writing process into six distinct parts which will guide students to write their own  biographies, mystery stories, short stories, and free planning of story, a blank  template that they can customize.


Via Inma Alcázar, Stacey Py Flynn
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RitaZ's curator insight, June 10, 2013 7:40 AM

Good for guided story writing.

Rhonda Kay's curator insight, June 18, 2013 3:44 PM

Must check this out...wonder if it's too K-12.

 

LundTechIntegration's curator insight, June 19, 2013 4:46 PM

Lots of awesome uses for this.  Added to my CCSS resources. 

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Demonstrating the Simplicity of Storytelling

Demonstrating the Simplicity of Storytelling | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

"Once again this shows the power of the mind to create a story to make sense of its surroundings. Your brain is happier to believe there are connections between the things that it sees. This is a vital insight for your brand experience. If you do not control the story, your audience will find their own and maybe it’s not the story you want to tell."


Via Gregg Morris
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RainboWillis's curator insight, June 14, 2013 1:20 PM

The Kuleshov effect. I didn't know this term, but of course it is true: Context plays a defining role in how we interpret narrative. 


This would be a useful video for my Creative Writing students.

XYEYE's comment, June 14, 2013 8:03 PM
Context I always say is the other king!
Ariana Amorim's curator insight, June 17, 2013 11:48 AM

This article tells us about the Kuleshov Effect and its implications on brand experience. I think there's more to it and that's why I rescoop it here.

 

The Kuleshov Effect is a film editing (montage) effect demonstrated by Russian filmmaker Lev Kuleshov in the 1910s and 1920s. 

 

In the dawn of the 20th century, cinema was a new art form, comprising many techniques that hadn’t been developed. The elements of editing were among the ones that had not been studied to the needed extension. Lev Kuleshov was among the first to indicate the power of film editing and to dissect the effects of juxtaposition.

 

Kuleshov put a film together, showing the expression of an actor, edited together with a plate of soup, a girl in a coffin and a woman on a recliner. Audiences praised the subtle acting, showing an almost imperceptible expression of hunger, grief, or lust in turn. The reality, of course, is that the same clip of the actor's face was re-used, and the effect is created entirely by its juxtaposition with other images.

 

Through his experiments and research, Kuleshov discovered that depending on how shots are assembled the audience will attach a specific meaning or emotion to it.The implication is that viewers brought their own emotional reactions to this sequence of images, and then moreover attributed those reactions to the actor, investing his impassive face with their own feelings.

 

So, can we recognize emotion without context? How do we reframe the stories we tell others and ourselves?

 

The stories that we tell ourselves are powerful. And yet, if you think about it, they are, in fact, just stories. 

 

Once we realize that, it then becomes possible to conclude that we could,  tell ourselves other stories –  stories that make space for our own growth, stories that build us up instead of break us down.

 

(You can read more about the Kuleshov effect here http://io9.com/5960035/can-the-kuleshov-effect-really-control-your-perception-of-other-peoples-feelings)

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Writing To Think: When a Student Can't Write It, Can She Think It?

Writing To Think: When a Student Can't Write It, Can She Think It? | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

In 2008, Fran Simmons, an English teacher at NewDorpHigh School in New York—at that time one of the lowest-performing secondary institutions in the nation— devised a simple test for her students in an effort to keep district officials from pulling the plug. First, she asked her freshman class to read Of Mice and Men. Then, using information from the novel, she asked them to answer the following prompt in a single sentence:

“Although George …”

She was looking for a sentence like: Although George worked very hard, he could not attain the American Dream.

What Simmons received was alarming in the truest sense of the word. Some students wrote passable sentences, but many could not manage to finish the line. More than a few wrote the following:

“Although George and Lenny were friends.”


Via Beth Dichter, Dennis T OConnor
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, May 16, 2013 10:49 PM

This in-depth post explores the issue of language impacts our ability to think. After an introduction the post is split into three sections.

The first section explores "the psycholingusitic case for writing education." It is noted that the Common Core states that students in grades 6-12 "should demonstrate increasing sophistication in all aspects of language use, from vocabulary and syntax to the development and organization of ideas, and they should address increasingly demanding content and sources.” 
And following this raised a different question:
"If a student can’t write it, however, why should we assume that she can think it?"

What follows is a look at language, where we see that the language we learn impacts us in many ways, that some cultures have many words for a word like snow while others do not, that cultures whom have language that have "gendered objects" impacts how people view the objects. 

The second section explores "Can you teach better math and science be teaching writing?" Information is provided about New Dorp High School (in New York). The school implemented a program that included "writing-to-learn" across the curriculum (except for math) and discovered that major gains in writing were apparent by the second year. 

The third section "highlights ten features of writing education that can be used to enhance student learning across all subject areas, ultimately resulting in higher academic performance."

The first two suggestions are below (all are quoted from the post).

1. Vocabulary Across The Disciplines: Emphasize that the concept of a word may change depending on the context in which it is used.
2. Syntax Across The Disciplines: Emphasize that every math problem and essay prompt has a hierarchical structure. 
Click through to the post to learn more about these two features of writing and about eight additional features.

Ann Kenady's curator insight, February 5, 2014 11:23 PM

This article gives compelling evidence that the ability to write effectively is closely linked to the ability to think coherently. The author writes, "Students’ inability to write was contributing to their inability to think, severely impeding intellectual growth across many subjects."



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Tch This Week: Common Core Playlist - Emphasis on Nonfiction | Teaching Channel

Tch This Week: Common Core Playlist - Emphasis on Nonfiction | Teaching Channel | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

by Sarah Brown Wessling

 

"You can start with the overview video and then move on to the three separate lessons that provide a detailed look at Ms. Brewer’s approach.

Analyzing Texts: Brainstorming Before Writing

Analyzing Texts: Putting Thoughts on Paper

Analyzing Texts: Text Talk Time

"Whether you’re an ELA teacher or using nonfiction in whatever discipline you teach, Ms. Duvoor’s video will make contextualization clear!"

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Jim Lerman's curator insight, June 15, 2013 11:14 AM

A collection of 4 videos on how to support student writing about non-fiction they have read through understanding the context of the writing. Well done.

Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.'s curator insight, June 16, 2013 7:25 PM

Excellent resources!

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Reflections on Teaching: Learning from our Stories | Faculty Focus

Reflections on Teaching: Learning from our Stories | Faculty Focus | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

By Maryellen Weimer

 

"Here's a great story. A graduate student is attending a lecture being given by one of her intellectual heroes, the Brazilian educator and theorist Paulo Freire. She takes notes furiously, trying to capture as many of his words as possible. Seeing that she is keenly interested in what Freire had to say, his translator asks if she would like to meet him. Of course! She is introduced and he begins by inquiring about her work. Then he graciously agrees to respond to a set of questions she and her colleagues hoped they would get the chance to ask him. She is impressed beyond belief, but time prevents her from asking one last, difficult question. They meet accidently once more at the event and he wonders if she asked all her questions? No, there is one more. "Given your work, we want to know 'where is the hope'?" Without hesitating he moves toward her, takes her face in his hands, looks into her eyes, and replies, "You tell them, 'you are the hope, because theory needs to be reinvented, not replicated ... it is a guide. We make history as we move through it and that is the hope."

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Jim Lerman's curator insight, June 12, 2013 9:27 AM

This story introduces a review of a book titled "What Our Stories Teach Us: A Guide to Critical Reflection for College Faculty". It is a heartfelt review and seems like a wonderful book. And I certainly like the story Weimer selected to write about.

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, June 12, 2013 9:54 AM

Theory needs to be reinvented (or reimagined) not replicated.

Luciano Lampi's curator insight, June 12, 2013 10:04 AM

the difference between a theory and a new theory!

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A little bird told me... | The Big Idea | Te Aria Nui

A little bird told me... | The Big Idea | Te Aria Nui | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

"As a creative practitioner, you're probably familiar with twitter as a key social media platform for marketing your projects to today’s internet-savvy audiences.But did you know it’s also a great storytelling tool

 

"But did you know it’s also a great storytelling tool? 

 

"Fiona Milburn, from Transmedia NZ, gives us five examples from storytellers who have embraced twitter as either a standalone story platform or as part of a wider story world."

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National Writing Project presents MOOC on Making, Creativity, and Learning

National Writing Project presents MOOC on  Making, Creativity, and Learning | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

"Making Learning Connected (#clmooc) is a collaborative, knowledge-building and sharing experience open to anyone who’s interested in making, creativity and learning. As we design and then engage in “makes” that tap into our personal (and professional) interests, share what we’ve done with the Making Learning Connected community, learn from each others’ experiences, and reflect on our own growth, we’ll be agents in the recursive creation and re-creation of this experience known as a Massively Open Online Collaboration (MOOC). Throughout the MOOC, we’ll engage with and employ Connected Learning principles as they relate to making and learning.

 

"All are welcome to engage at whatever level and to whatever extent makes sense. Making Learning Connected includes pathways – for making, for connecting, for sharing – that allow for greater and lesser degrees of independence and guidance. Follow a linear thread through the six weeks of this MOOC or dip a toe in at one place or another, to create a unique path.

For more information, visit the Making Learning Connected FAQs."

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Jim Lerman's curator insight, June 11, 2013 4:54 PM

Starts June 15 and runs for 6 weeks. Of course it's free.

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Good Writing vs. Talented Writing | Brain Pickings

Good Writing vs. Talented Writing | Brain Pickings | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

By Maria Popova

 

"The secrets of good writing have been debated again and again and again. But “good writing” might, after all, be the wrong ideal to aim for. In About Writing: Seven Essays, Four Letters, and Five Interviews (public library), celebrated author and literary critic Samuel Delany — who, for a fascinating factlet, penned thecontroversial 1972 “women’s liberation” issue of Wonder Woman — synthesizes his most valuable insights from thirty-five years of teaching creative writing, a fine addition tobeloved writers’ advice on writing. One of his key observations is the crucial difference between “good writing” and “talented writing,” the former being largely the product of technique (and we know from H.P. Lovecraft that “no aspiring author should content himself with a mere acquisition of technical rules”), the other a matter of linguistic and aesthetic sensitivity:"

Jim Lerman's insight:

Even for the richly talented Popova, whose work is consistently excellent, this is an unusually great piece.

 

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Content Curation Tool: eduClipper Launches Its "Pinterest For Education"

Content Curation Tool: eduClipper Launches Its "Pinterest For Education" | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

Excerpted from review article on TechCrunch:
"This week the teacher-turned-entrepreneur Adam Below officially launched eduClipper, a platform that allows teachers and students to explore, share and contribute to a library of educational content. In both function and design, it’s essentially a Pinterest for education, with one notable difference: Because eduClipper is built exclusively for teachers and students, unlike Pinterest, you probably won’t find it blocked by your local school.

Educators and students can explore thousands of pieces of educational content, find lesson plans, resources and videos and search for the most popular content by subject or interest.

With eduClipper, users can share individual eduClips (or pieces of content) or eduClipboards (collections of content) with colleagues or students while cross-posting or embedding that content on other social platforms or sending them through email.

EduClips are created through the site’s bookmarklet (a Chrome extension), so once it’s installed in their browsers, teachers and students can grab any content they find on the web, Google Drive, Google Apps and more, and add them to their collection, i.e. their eduClipboards. Once grabbed, the site automatically grabs the source link, too, so that it’s easy to get back to the original content and easy to give proper citation.

Teachers and students can share these clipboards so that their classmates and colleagues can collaborate on assignments or in-class activities, create groups to share these resources with and align the content that’s clipped and shared to Common Core Standards. That’s the big advantage of eduClipper over Pinterest, that content can easily be organized and annotated for each class or subject by way of these learning collections. It also has the benefit of being created by a teacher who has spent the last five years searching for and curating the web’s best educational content..."

Read full review article by TechCrunch here:
http://techcrunch.com/2013/06/02/educlipper-launches-its-pinterest-for-education-to-bring-better-crowdsourced-curation-sharing-to-the-classroom/

Try out eduClipper: https://www.educlipper.net

 


Via Giuseppe Mauriello
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Anna Vidal Oldham's curator insight, June 5, 2013 5:49 AM

Great tool!

 

Alejandro Tortolini's curator insight, June 6, 2013 10:55 AM

EduClipper: para hacer curaduría de contenidos educativos.

Bart van Maanen's curator insight, June 10, 2013 6:30 AM

Zo te zien een prachtige manier om op een Pinterest-achtige manier online info en content te verzamelen voor in de klas. Iedere leerling kan er aan bijdragen en notities toevoegen via een bookmark app in Chrome. De originele link / vindplaats wordt tegelijk opgeslagen. Nice.

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Booktype - free open source publishing

Booktype - free open source publishing | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

From the site: "Booktype is a free, open source platform that produces beautiful, engaging books formatted for print, Amazon, iBooks and almost any ereader within minutes. Create books on your own or with others via an easy-to-use web interface. Build a community around your content with social tools and use the reach of mobile, tablet and ebook technology to engage new audiences."


Via helpingmedia, Jim Lerman
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Scaffolding Student Research & Writing in Higher Education

Scaffolding student research and writing: A win-win solution. Workshop prepared for the Writing Across the Curriculum Institute.

Via Professor Jill Jameson
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Rescooped by Jim Lerman from Digital Presentations in Education
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30hands app for storytelling and presentation

Different from other presentation apps, 30hands Mobile focuses on the power of storytelling. Like pages in a book, photos or images are dragged around the desktop into the order of the story. Next, the teacher or student records audio over each image. Finally, the story or presentation can be published to the device’s photo area or uploaded to a 30hands collaborative learning site.


Via Baiba Svenca
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Chaiyi Bee's curator insight, June 9, 2013 3:30 AM

手機可用的

designandtech's curator insight, June 9, 2013 10:25 AM

Very easy to use with elementary grade students. 

Samantha Ellis's curator insight, June 9, 2013 7:23 PM

This is fabulous, Could be a valuable source for all levels of learners, easy to use and could help establish new ideas.

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180 Journal Writing Prompts: Enough for Every Day of the School Year

180 Journal Writing Prompts:  Enough for Every Day of the School Year | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

Journal Writing Prompts: These high-interest prompts will encourage kids to describe, explain, persuade, and narrate every day of the school year.


Via Kath Lok
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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, June 17, 2013 6:23 PM

I believe you should teach your students how to write without prompts. That said, it's great to have prompts available when the pump needs priming. 

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36 Digital Storytelling Sites and Apps From edshelf

36 Digital Storytelling Sites and Apps From edshelf | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
Websites & mobile apps for digital storytelling, such as Toontastic, VoiceThread, StoryKit, Xtranormal, Puppet Pals, Pixton, Storybird, Comic Master, etc.

Via Stacey Py Flynn
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Stacey Py Flynn's curator insight, June 12, 2013 8:33 AM

Pretty good list! 

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StoryToolz : Resources for Authors

StoryToolz : Resources for Authors | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Jasmin Rez's curator insight, July 4, 2013 11:28 AM

Useful Writing Tools and Resources

tom jackson's curator insight, July 6, 2013 7:48 AM

need assistance with writing prompts and critique?

Alfredo Corell's curator insight, July 8, 2013 6:59 AM

Really good tools for writters

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The Common Core State Standards are requiring students give evidence and explain their answers - spoken and written. Here is a good article to give perspective on the benefits of this process. St...

The Common Core State Standards are requiring students give evidence and explain their answers - spoken and written.  Here is a good article to give perspective on the benefits of this process.  St... | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
Why teachers should ask students to explain their answers Teachers can help students learn by asking them to explain their work -- rather than memorize and repeat answers -- researchers...

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Year-End Lesson Summaries | The Learning Network - The New York Times

Year-End Lesson Summaries | The Learning Network - The New York Times | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

Collections of all the lesson plans published via the NY Times Learning Network, grouped by curriculum area: 

1. Language Arts, Journalism, and the Arts

2. Science, Health, Technology and Math

3. Social Studies, History, Georgraphy, and Civics

4. A collection of 182 Student Opinion questions, from this school year, all still open to comment on our blog. Each asks students to read a short, high-interest nonfiction piece from The Times, then write in a response.

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Jim Lerman's curator insight, June 14, 2013 2:03 AM

A great deal of excellent material here.

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How To Teach Writing: 7 Strategies for Elaboration | Busy Teacher

How To Teach Writing: 7 Strategies for Elaboration | Busy Teacher | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

from the website

 

"Do your students struggle to write with detail? Are their descriptions limited, lacking in specifics or uninformative? If so, you can help your students write more engaging and elaborate pieces by teaching the following strategies for elaboration. Elaboration: 7 Writing Strategies"

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5 ideas for using Google Hangouts On Air | Innovative Educator

5 ideas for using Google Hangouts On Air | Innovative Educator | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

By Lisa Nielsen

 

"If you're an innovative educator, by now, you have probably tried Google Hangouts which let you conduct a video conference with up to ten people / locations FOR FREE! This by itself has terrific potential for teaching and learning tool. 


I explained here ways the following ideas could be put to use in the classroom:1)  Take a class without having to be in the same place. 2)  Invite an audience to a performance. 3)  Invite others to perform/discuss with you. What you may yet to have tried is livestreaming your Hangout and capturing it via YouTube. This is known as Google Hangouts On Air which takes something that was already awesome, and makes it even better. 
You can see what it is here:"
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Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.'s curator insight, June 11, 2013 8:52 PM

I am currently leading my students toward Google + hangouts vs. Skype. This seems to be a growing trend.

Randy Bauer's comment, June 13, 2013 1:08 AM
We are on the forefront of a new frontier in education.
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I have a cunning plan... | Cooperative Catalyst

I have a cunning plan... | Cooperative Catalyst | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

by alanthefreisen

 

"Next year, we’re planning on implementing a new SIS and gradebook at our school. Groundbreaking news, eh? The kicker is that our new gradebook supports individual assignments for individual students.

 

"Think about that for a second.

 

"For the first time, I can build assignments that are specific to an individual student, and not have to worry about the hassle of reporting said assignments in a gradebook designed for assignments given out to the entire class.

 

"This makes me excited. Thrilled, even! I’ve been differentiating for a few years now, as best as I can, but my efforts have been hampered by the need to create the same assignments for each student. Sure, Tracey’s got an essay and Mark’s working on a short story, but they both need to be out of 35 and according the gradebook they’re both due on the same day, even though that’s not true and the short story shouldn’t really be out of 35, anyway. No more! It also means that I can lessen the impact of competition in my class. I handed back a set of essays today, and instead of the students listening to me about how they can make their next essay better, they spent most of the time quietly asking each other who got the highest mark, and slipping a calculator from one hand to the other to figure out what the score at the bottom of their detailed rubric meant. Yes, real learning was happening today in my class, folks. 

 

"So, here’s the question, and one of the reasons I’m posting today: how do I make individualised instruction, true individualised instruction, work? I teach English Language Arts and I’d like to pilot this process with a single group of senior high English students. I’d also like students to be exploring texts which interest them instead of assigning a single book for an entire group of learners, for instance, as well as allowing them the opportunity to demonstrate their knowledge in forms they choose.

 

"This is my first draft:"

 

Jim Lerman's insight:

Definitely a deep and provocative thinker at work here.

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Rhet Sims | Rhetorical Simulations

Rhet Sims | Rhetorical Simulations | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

Description by TeachThought

 

"Rhetorical simulations (Rhet Sims) are interactive texts designed to teach students how to think critically about their own habits of mind when writing. Participants are given a writing prompt and then are asked to create a short text by selecting among a series of paragraph options. A short document is created and then students are asked to explain why the document they created best addresses the need of the assignment. Rhet Sims help students develop a critical awareness of how their choices shape their writing."

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