Scriveners' Trappings
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Scriveners' Trappings
Aids and resources for creators and teachers of writing, interactive fiction, digital stories, and transmedia
Curated by Jim Lerman
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Accidentally Creating a Digital Writing Workshop ~ Edutopia

Accidentally Creating a Digital Writing Workshop ~ Edutopia | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

by Erin Klein


"I knew that any future project would never be the same. After allowing students to have such independence and seeing how creative and responsible they were, how could I not allow them to have more ownership of their learning?


"Technology was now a part of our learning -- technology to research, explore, create and share. It was natural for the children to use chart paper, markers, their voices, iPads and computers. There was never a choice to use technology or not use technology, but rather to think about what tool would support their objective. Some chose paper, some chose an iPad. I learned that introducing the students to a variety of tools allowed each child to have more creative choice.:

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Jose Carlos Martín's comment, October 18, 2013 6:00 PM
a veces las cosas surjan de forma natural, sin forzarlas, y el resultado es sorprendente
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5 great writing warm up activities... and what they lead to | Teach them English

5 great writing warm up activities... and what they lead to | Teach them English | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

by Adam Simpson


"Warm up activities that get learners writing can be fantastic for getting the creative juices flowing while also giving a focused start to your lesson. A writing task at the start of class can be an effective way of leading into explicit grammar teaching or can just as easily be followed up with speaking activities. What’s more, many such activities are easy to adapt to be suitable for any type of learners, both adults and kids. Indeed, adding an entertaining element to writing activities will make them fun for everyone, as well as making them low pressure tasks which enable learners’ writing to flow freely. Here are five of my favourites."

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Excellent Videos OnThe Use of Augmented Reality Apps by Students | Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

Excellent Videos OnThe Use of Augmented Reality Apps by Students | Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

Below are some good videos I got a few days ago on examples of how some augmented reality apps are being used with kids to help them improve their learning. If the concept of augmented reality


if all new to you then here is a brief definition of it: Augmented Reality is exactly what the name implies: an augmented version of realty created by mixing technology with the known world. It might be a distorted, augmented, or less augmented version of the actual world but in its basic form, augmented reality is a simulation or rather a way of superimposing digital contents into the real context.

You can learn more about the importance of augmented reality in education from " Teachers' Guide to Augmented Reality ".

Now here are some video examples of augmented reality concept in action. These tutorials are all brought to you from apps by Paul Hamilton website.


Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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How to Choose Curricular Resources in Blended Learning Models :: Free webinar, Thurs. Oct. 24, 3-4 PM (Eastern)

How to Choose Curricular Resources in Blended Learning Models :: Free webinar, Thurs. Oct. 24, 3-4 PM (Eastern) | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

"With the explosion of available new digital resources such as websites, apps, and games, the number of potential resources available to teachers has dramatically increased; however educators now have the additional challenge of trying to figure out which digital resources best support the classroom and align with their curriculum.


"Dr. Tim Hudson will share ideas for strategically choosing resources that not only align with your curriculum, but also enhance student learning outcomes, especially for schools using blended learning models. We'll explore how the quality of digital learning experiences is just as important as the quality of classroom learning experiences, as well as how new technologies should be used to do more than act as a digital substitute for existing print resources. Join us to learn to evaluate whether resources are aligned with content and process standards, and also how to best leverage new technologies to support the success of all students."


Presented by EdWeb, sponsored by DreamBox Learning.

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The Future Of Storytelling Is About To Get Wild ~readwrite

The Future Of Storytelling Is About To Get Wild ~readwrite | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

"Many of us go about our lives constantly surrounded by screens, immersed in various "stories": movies, TV shows, books, plot-driven video games, news articles, advertising, and more. Whether we realize it or not, we're creating new behaviors, routines, mindsets, and expectations around what we watch, read or play—which in turn presents new challenges and opportunities for creators and marketers.



"In other words, while the fundamentals of good storytelling remain the same, technology is changing how stories can be told. But what does that mean exactly?



"Since last year, Latitude, a strategic insights consultancy, has been conducting an ongoing Future of Storytelling initiative to understand what audiences want for the long haul. Below are eight predictions for the future of storytelling based on what we found. (More information about Latitude's multi-phase research project is available here.)


Jim Lerman's insight:


If your are involved with, or interested in, storytelling in any way, this article is essential reading...because it presents a clear picture of ways in which storytelling is very likely to change in the near future.


Via Kamal Bennani, Alessandro Rea
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Digital literacy, gaming and contemporary narrative writing

Digital literacy, gaming and contemporary narrative writing | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
What constitutes digital literacies is an interesting topic in contemporary learning environments. When I was teaching in a school I spent much energy trying to convince the “literacy team” that th...

Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Dennis T OConnor
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Sarah McElrath's curator insight, October 16, 2013 8:03 PM

Control -- something we all long for in life.

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5 Brilliant Tools for Student Storytelling

5 Brilliant Tools for Student Storytelling | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
Five fantastic online tools educators can use to encourage student storytelling. Start telling vibrant and exciting stories and have fun doing it!

Via José Carlos, Carla Arena, kathymcdonough
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Maria Eva Blaiotta's curator insight, October 5, 2013 9:04 PM

Storytelling can contribute to academic success. It reminds us that the spoken word is powerful and that telling stories and listening to them can enhance our students’ ability to communicate their thoughts and feelings. Here are some digotal storytelling tools we can use in the classroom. 

Carmenne Kalyaniwala-Thapliyal's curator insight, October 11, 2013 9:50 AM

Tools that can be used for storytelling at elementary/middle school or for students of EFL: Storykit, Educreations, Comic Life, Storybird, and Kerpoof

Thea Phillips's curator insight, October 15, 2013 8:06 AM

These are some great tools to get you into the heart of story telling . They help you to create the book of your dreams 

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Elementary Writing Prompts - Writing Rightly

Elementary Writing Prompts - Writing Rightly | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
These elementary writing prompts are great for getting the students writing, in a non-pressurized, fun way.


Penelope Silver's insight


"Sometimes we all need a little push to get going on a writing spree. Students are just beginning their writing journey, so this article could be a big help for teachers. It gives 52 Elementary Writing Prompts--one for every week of the year--to get their little fingers flying.

 

"I shared it because there are also some great story prompts here for adults. I believe these could be used to jog our memories about certain events in our lives. It just may lead to a short story, and then possibly a book!

 

"Have fun with them, let your imagination run wild, and see where it takes you!"

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article:http://www.journalinghelps.com/Elementary-Writing-Prompts.html


Via Penelope
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Penelope's curator insight, August 27, 2013 11:35 PM

 

Sometimes we all need a little push to get going on a writing spree. Students are just beginning their writing journey, so this article could be a big help for teachers. It gives 52 Elementary Writing Prompts--one for every week of the year--to get their little fingers flying.

 

I shared it because there are also some great story prompts here for adults. I believe these could be used to jog our memories about certain events in our lives. It just may lead to a short story, and then possibly a book!

 

Have fun with them, let your imagination run wild, and see where it takes you!

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article: http://www.journalinghelps.com/Elementary-Writing-Prompts.html

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Harnessing the Storm in Your Brain through Mind Mapping | Live Write Thrive

Harnessing the Storm in Your Brain through Mind Mapping | Live Write Thrive | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
Insights, inspiration, and practical advice for writers


My brain is a storm all right. It is sometimes more like a storm drain; all the ideas go whooshing through.

 

Mind mapping is an amazing tool for harnessing those ideas into usable format. Using Freemind software, I once mind mapped out an entire book in a half hour. I personally love the way it allows your creative mind to flow uninhibited; as you see the ideas pile up, right in front of your eyes, more ideas pop up.

 

Think of mind maps as travel maps. They help you get to where you want to go with your novel. Read the article for more details on how this process actually works.

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article:http://www.livewritethrive.com/2013/09/23/harnessing-the-storm-in-your-brain-through-mind-mapping/


Via Penelope
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Penelope's curator insight, October 14, 2013 10:01 PM

 

My brain is a storm all right. It is sometimes more like a storm drain; all the ideas go whooshing through.

 

Mind mapping is an amazing tool for harnessing those ideas into usable format. Using Freemind software, I once mind mapped out an entire book in a half hour. I personally love the way it allows your creative mind to flow uninhibited; as you see the ideas pile up, right in front of your eyes, more ideas pop up.

 

Think of mind maps as travel maps. They help you get to where you want to go with your novel. Read the article for more details on how this process actually works.

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article: http://www.livewritethrive.com/2013/09/23/harnessing-the-storm-in-your-brain-through-mind-mapping/

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Anaïs Nin on Writing and Creativity: Wisdom from a Rare 1947 Chapbook

Anaïs Nin on Writing and Creativity: Wisdom from a Rare 1947 Chapbook | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
"It is in the movements of emotional crisis that human beings reveal themselves most accurately." "While we refuse to organize the confusions within us we will never have an objective understanding of what is happening outside." "Today a novelist’s preoccupation with inner psychological distortions does not stem from a morbid love of illness but from a knowledge that this is the theme of our new reality."
Via Douglas Eby
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9 tools for creating great animations | Animation | Creative Bloq

9 tools for creating great animations | Animation | Creative Bloq | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
“ These web-based applications will have you creating animations in no time.”
Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge, Deanna Mascle
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Writing for a real audience! ~ Mr P's ICT blog - iPads in the Classroom:

Writing for a real audience! ~ Mr P's ICT blog - iPads in the Classroom: | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
"This half term I have been working with a year 5 class on a Thursday afternoon. We have been basing our work around the theme from the Film Blackfish about Whales in captivity. In the first week back in September, after discussing the film with the class, the class created an awareness video, which supported the fight to free Orca whales in captivity. 

"The amount the children have been blogging about this topic has been amazing! The standard and quality of writing is clear to see as children know that their writing is being read by experts and professionals all over the world - You can read some of their work here."
"From this reaction, it has provided the class with an audience and therefore a REAL purpose to write. I had to use this opportunity and the platform of the blog to share children's writing about this topic. 
"The amount the children have been blogging about this topic has been amazing! The standard and quality of writing is clear to see as children know that their writing is being read by experts and professionals all over the world - You can read some of their work here."
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Famous Authors' Handwritten Outlines for Great Works of Literature ~ Flavorwire

Famous Authors' Handwritten Outlines for Great Works of Literature ~ Flavorwire | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

Illustration above is J.K. Rowling’s spreadsheet plan for Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix.


by Emily Temple


"Writing a novel (or a story, for that matter) is confusing work. There are just so many characters running all over the place, dropping hints and having revelations. So it’s no surprise that many authors plan out their works beforehand, in chart or list or scribble form, in order to keep everything straight. After the jump, you’ll find a mini collection of those planning papers, so you can take a peek into the process of some of your favorite authors, from James Salter to J.K. Rowling."

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Scholastic.com | Teachers: Write It

Scholastic.com | Teachers: Write It | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

"Write It is an online writing resource that’s packed with engaging ways to build your students’ writing skills. The site provides teachers and students with:

• A growing set of valuable resources from two years ofLiterary Cavalcade and other Scholastic publications

• Units of lessons and activities, which focus on specific genres. Get started now with our PoetryEssayShort FictionMemoirHumor, and Journalism units.

• An Interactive Online Community for students and teachers to share and discuss writing"


Jim Lerman's insight


This wealth of resources is free

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Writing the Hot Spot First

Writing the Hot Spot First | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
How, she wondered, could we get them to write more focused narratives? And what types of entries could they make in their writer's notebooks to help them with this process?

Via Deanna Mascle
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40 Ways to Use Google Apps in the Classroom - Google Drive

40 Ways to Use Google Apps in the Classroom - Google Drive | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

A slide deck with lots of good suggestions. Produced by Becky Evans

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Free, Digital Storytelling online conference, Sat. Oct. 19 ~ SimpleK-12

Free, Digital Storytelling online conference, Sat. Oct. 19 ~ SimpleK-12 | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

All-day on Saturday, Oct. 19, SimpleK-12 sponsors a free series of 7 online webinars for classroom teachers on Digital Storytelling. Topics include Creativity and Innovation, Publishing Digital Books, Digital Personas with Talking Avatars, Timelines as Story Mechanisms, Talking Pictures, Using iPhones, Maximizing Value from the Teacher Learning Community. Presentations use free resources.

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4 Tips to Solve 99% of Your Writing Problems — Guest: Janice Hardy | Jami Gold, Paranormal Author

4 Tips to Solve 99% of Your Writing Problems — Guest: Janice Hardy | Jami Gold, Paranormal Author | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

"I’m a huge believer that mastering point of view (POV) will solve 99% of common writing problems. If a writer understands POV, then showing comes naturally, description is easier to write, character goals are clear, the stakesare personal, and thus stories feel more organic."

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Sarah McElrath's curator insight, October 16, 2013 7:55 PM

Good insights on how POV impacts your writing.

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Best Digital Tools for Writer's Workshop ~ My Paperless Classroom

Best Digital Tools for Writer's Workshop ~ My Paperless Classroom | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

Sam Patterson's ISTE 13 presentation on the best digital tools to use to support writer's workshop. Includes full video of preso, just the slides, and notes from the preso. Truly wonderful capture of the info presented. -JL

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Write great dialogue scenes in 7 steps - Writing Rightly

Write great dialogue scenes in 7 steps - Writing Rightly | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

"Of all the scenes we write, dialogue is the most complex and rich. Most writers I know take several passes to get it right."


Penelope Silver's insight:


"Dialogue is one of those tricky areas that trip up many authors--myself included. As I am writing my first romance novel, I run into areas such as:

 

"How much dialogue is enough?

When and where should you insert dialogue?

When should you move from narrator consciousness to talking?

How long should you make the responses?

 

"Author Roz Morris gives us seven simple steps to writing great dialogue. You would think most would seem obvious, but some of them are real ah ha! moments. I really appreciate these tips:

 

"VISUALS - People move as they talk. They shrug, make faces, cook, clean, etc. Create a picture in your reader's mind. This will create a richer, more dramatic scene.

 

"REACTIONS - Are the characters reacting and talking or does their internal dialogue evaporate when they start being vocal?

 

"DECLUTTER - Think of your reader when you write dialogue. Readers scan through these scenes quickly, and don't need to be told of every breath and blink. Let your scene sit for a few days, and go back at it with fresh eyes to take out the fat.

 

"Head on over to the article to read four more great tips!"

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article:http://nailyournovel.wordpress.com/2013/04/28/write-great-dialogue-scenes-in-7-steps



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Penelope's curator insight, August 12, 2013 2:17 PM

 

Dialogue is one of those tricky areas that trip up many authors--myself included. As I am writing my first romance novel, I run into areas such as:

 

How much dialogue is enough?

When and where should you insert dialogue?

When should you move from narrator consciousness to talking?

How long should you make the responses?

 

Author Roz Morris gives us seven simple steps to writing great dialogue. You would think most would seem obvious, but some of them are real ah ha! moments. I really appreciate these tips:

 

VISUALS - People move as they talk. They shrug, make faces, cook, clean, etc. Create a picture in your reader's mind. This will create a richer, more dramatic scene.

 

REACTIONS - Are the characters reacting and talking or does their internal dialogue evaporate when they start being vocal?

 

DECLUTTER - Think of your reader when you write dialogue. Readers scan through these scenes quickly, and don't need to be told of every breath and blink. Let your scene sit for a few days, and go back at it with fresh eyes to take out the fat.

 

Header on over to the article to read four more great tips!

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article: http://nailyournovel.wordpress.com/2013/04/28/write-great-dialogue-scenes-in-7-steps

 

Editing in Paradise's curator insight, August 12, 2013 5:30 PM

What on earth are they saying? With this excellent advice, you can bet it it's worth listening to.

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10 Tips For Writing Endings To Your Story - Writing Rightly

10 Tips For Writing Endings To Your Story - Writing Rightly | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

"Always keep in mind what is expected in the genre you’re writing. If you’re writing a category romance, then the hero and heroine must unite at the end."


Penelope Silver's insight


"Writing endings for our stories could be the easiest thing in the world or the hardest. The best way to begin is to ponder on what kind of ending is expected for the genre in which you are writing. If you are writing a category romance, readers are going to expect the love interests to finally get together and have a happy ending. There have been exceptions (Romeo and Juliet or Love Story). If you are a reader anticipating a romantic story and happy ending, do you want to read a tragic ending? I don't.

 

"The 10 tips presented should give you a great beginning to write your own ending. Check out the article for all the details.

 

1. Always keep in mind what is EXPECTED in the genre.

2. Avoid the dreaded DEUX EX MACHINE (gods taking care of it).

3. Think APPROPRIATE ending rather than satisfying ending. 
4. NO MISERABLE ENDINGS for characters to no real purpose
5. Struggling? Compose an EVENT. Bring most characters together
6. REALLY struggling—go back to the BEGINNING.
7. When the story is over—STOP.
8. BEWARE of TOO MUCH BUILD UP with too quick a resolution.
9. No need to tie up every little plot string, but TIE UP MOST of them
10. EPILOGS: I kind of like them (peek into the future)"

 

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article:http://debravega.wordpress.com/2013/08/18/10-tips-for-writing-endings-to-your-story/


Via Inspire the Muse, Penelope
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Penelope's curator insight, August 23, 2013 4:07 PM

 

Writing endings for our stories could be the easiest thing in the world or the hardest. The best way to begin is to ponder on what kind of ending is expected for the genre in which you are writing. If you are writing a category romance, readers are going to expect the love interests to finally get together and have a happy ending. There have been exceptions (Romeo and Juliet or Love Story). If you are a reader anticipating a romantic story and happy ending, do you want to read a tragic ending? I don't.

 

The 10 tips presented should give you a great beginning to write your own ending. Check out the article for all the details.

 

1. Always keep in mind what is EXPECTED in the genre.

2. Avoid the dreaded DEUX EX MACHINE (gods taking care of it).

3. Think APPROPRIATE ending rather than satisfying ending.
4. NO MISERABLE ENDINGS for characters to no real purpose
5. Struggling? Compose an EVENT. Bring most characters together
6. REALLY struggling—go back to the BEGINNING.
7. When the story is over—STOP.
8. BEWARE of TOO MUCH BUILD UP with too quick a resolution.
9. No need to tie up every little plot string, but TIE UP MOST of them
10. EPILOGS: I kind of like them (peek into the future)

 

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article: http://debravega.wordpress.com/2013/08/18/10-tips-for-writing-endings-to-your-story/

 

 

 

Kimberley Vico's curator insight, August 24, 2013 12:40 AM

Like a strong beginning, you ought to have a good ending ~ in any story!  Give it a try...!

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Writing at the Speed of the Unconscious

Writing at the Speed of the Unconscious | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
“ Writing faster than you think possible can unleash creativity and prevent writer's block.”
Via stan stewart
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Video Game Writing and the Sense of Story ... - Transmedia Camp 101

Video Game Writing and the Sense of Story ... - Transmedia Camp 101 | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
“ See on Scoop.it – Tracking Transmedia Game writing struggles with the contradictions of storytelling because the approach is wrong. The right approach is storysensing, not storytelling…. Dramaturgy (What Stories Are)It all ...”
Via Jeni Mawter, Jeffrey Earp
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Two Important YouTube Tips for Teachers ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

Two Important YouTube Tips for Teachers ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

by Med Kharbach


"YouTube is definitely one of the video repositories we teachers and educators use to look for educational video resources to share with our students. But what if the video you find is 30 minutes long and the segment that you want to share from this video is only two minutes long.Would you share the whole video then forward play it to the part you want or is there  another simpler way to do it?

"Well, there are several ways to chop YouTube videos and I have already reviewed some of these tools in this post. However, today , I am sharing with you two practical tips I learned from Chris Kesler."

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How to Be an Educated Consumer of Infographics: David Byrne on the Art-Science of Visual Storytelling

How to Be an Educated Consumer of Infographics: David Byrne on the Art-Science of Visual Storytelling | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

by Maria Popova


"As an appreciator of the art of visual storytelling by way of good information graphics – an art especially endangered in this golden age of bad infographics served as linkbait – I was thrilled and honored to be on the advisory “Brain Trust” for a project by Pulitzer-Prize-winning journalist, New Yorkerwriter, and Scientific American neuroscience blog editor Gareth Cook, who has set out to highlight the very best infographics produced each year, online and off. (Disclaimer for the naturally cynical: No money changed hands.)The Best American Infographics 2013(public library) is now out, featuring the finest examples from the past year – spanning everything from happiness to sports to space to gender politics, and including a contribution by friend-of-Brain Pickings Wendy MacNaughton – with an introduction by none other than David Byrne. Accompanying each image is an artist statement that explores the data, the choice of visual representation, and why it works."

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