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Top Web Series of 2012 Set New Bar For Quality | readwrite

Top Web Series of 2012 Set New Bar For Quality | readwrite | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

By Fruzsina Eördögh

 

Yahoo beat Google in 2012, when it came to original web video programming. A look back at the best video series the Internet has to offer.

Jim Lerman's insight:

I have not paid any atttention to orginal video programming on the web, so this article about the top series comes as something of a surprise to me. I'm going to have to check this out. Please be aware that much of this programming is for mature audiences.

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Scriveners' Trappings
Aids and resources for creators and teachers of writing, interactive fiction, digital stories, and transmedia
Curated by Jim Lerman
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Students Email Their Parents About Missing Work

Students Email Their Parents About Missing Work | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

"In my last blog post titled, “Stop Taking Grading Home,” I explained how I use the Station Rotation Model to provide students with real-time feedback as they work instead of taking grading home. I had one teacher ask me what I do when a student arrives at my teacher-led station and has not done the work required. That’s a great question, so I wanted to share my very simple strategy with my readers.

"If students have fallen behind on a formal essay, large scale assignment, or project, I require that they begin their session with me at the teacher-led real-time feedback station by writing their parents an email to explain why they have not completed the work they were assigned. They must CC me on the email, use the formal business letter format, and propose a specific action plan to catch up on their work.

"This strategy is so simple but so effective! Students are rarely asked to take ownership of and responsibility for their work. Typically, a parent does not realize there is a problem until a zero is entered into a gradebook or report cards are mailed home. Requiring students to contact their parents and take responsibility for their work at various check-points along the process creates an incentive for students to prioritize their school work. This strategy also takes the responsibility off of the teacher, who is typically the person tasked with reaching out to the parents when there is an issue.

"The most rewarding part of this strategy are the conversations that take place between parents and their children. Because I am CCed on the initial email, parents typically “reply all” and keep me in the loop as they dialogue with their child. I love the questions parents ask in their follow-up emails, like “Why weren’t you able to complete this part of the assignment when it was due? How are you using your class time? What can I do at home to support you in getting your work done?” I see so much value in encouraging students to have these conversations with their parents."

Jim Lerman's insight:

 

Fantastic idea!

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Tracy K. Smith Is Named 22nd U.S. Poet Laureate: Emma Niles

Tracy K. Smith Is Named 22nd U.S. Poet Laureate: Emma Niles | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
The Princeton University professor and Pulitzer Prize winner says she plans to bring poetry events “to parts of the country where literary festivals don’t always go.”
- 2017/06/14

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An A.I. Says There Are Six Main Kinds of Stories

An A.I. Says There Are Six Main Kinds of Stories | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
A machine mapped the most frequently used emotional trajectories in fiction, and compared them with the ones readers like best.

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A Writing-Exercise Grab Bag - Gulf Coast: A Journal of Literature and Fine Arts

A Writing-Exercise Grab Bag - Gulf Coast: A Journal of Literature and Fine Arts | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
There are many different types of writing: but I've found it's just plain easier to write when I have a clear, manageable objective, no matter what stage of the writing process I'm at. So I thought I'd share some exercises I've collected over the years that can provide jump starts and inject energy into material you've already generated, leading you to those unexpected places that make fiction worthwhile. Feel free to mix and match. 

 

Jim Lerman's insight:

 

Some very high potential suggestions offered here for writing exercises.

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How to Write a Damned Good Scene, Part 1

How to Write a Damned Good Scene, Part 1 | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
Often while looking at the scenes a new writer creates, I take a look and think, Well, that’s pretty lame. So how do you avoid writing lame scenes? First, you need to brainstorm every scene. There …

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Text Inspector - The professional web tool for analysing texts

Text Inspector - The professional web tool for analysing texts | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

"Text Inspector analyses the difficulty level of texts in English, giving you an instant score and detailed feedback. Try it now!"

 

Up to 500 words for free. -JL


Via Ana Cristina Pratas, James Funk, THE *OFFICIAL ANDREASCY*
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Sarah McElrath's curator insight, June 20, 10:20 AM
If you go to the help menu and look up Phrases - Metadiscourse, it defines the Textual and Interpersonal markers used to analyze the text. What I found helpful for student readers/writers (and for me) was the full list of markers used. 
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Indigenous Literary Perspectives In Global Conversation

Indigenous Literary Perspectives In Global Conversation | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

via The Scout Report

 

"K-12 English and social studies instructors will find a variety of resources for teaching indigenous literature, culture, and history on this website. This online resource was created in 2015 as part of a National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Summer Institute for educators, headed by Native American Studies scholar Kathryn W. Shanley and Curriculum and Instruction scholar Phyllis Bo-yuen Ngai. During the Summer Institute, participating K-12 educators had the opportunity to hear from a number of experts in Native American studies before using their own expertise in K-12 instruction to craft a number of unit plans and other classroom resources. Visitors to this site will find these lesson plans via the Teacher Authors section on the right panel of the homepage. Each resource is accompanied by a short biography of the teacher who created it as well as their current classroom. In addition, educators can check out a list of all resources used into this institute via the Institute Materials section."

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11 Apps to Learn with Poetry

11 Apps to Learn with Poetry | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
Poetry is a great way to inspire your learners to be creative and imaginative with a topic. Writing poetry can be difficult for students, but the engaging apps below will help your students create and learn with poems. For more ideas and activities, see the slide presentation, Learning with Poetry, and the bookmarks below for more ideas and resources.
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Sarah McElrath's curator insight, June 20, 10:37 AM
Poetry can be powerful. Here are some apps to help your students harness it.
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A New Type of Writing Prompt - TechNotes Blog - TCEA

A New Type of Writing Prompt - TechNotes Blog - TCEA | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
Elementary teachers, looking for a fun way to get kids to write? Try this emoji writing prompt generator. Your students will love it!

I have been around long enough to see many crazy fads: pet rocks, Care Bears, Smurfs, and Angry Birds. Do you know the current fad in pop culture? Think. Think hard. You know it, (I know you do) because THESE are everywhere. Picture walking down the aisles of Walmart, CVS, Target, or your local grocery store, and what do you spy?

Emojis. Yes, you read that correctly, Emojis. These small images that represent emotions have been transformed into tattoos, pillows, slippers, Halloween costumes, and Pez dispensers. So why not use them in an elementary writing class?
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Math Journal Prompts by Allison Childers - Teacher Tech

Math Journal Prompts by Allison Childers - Teacher Tech | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

"Have Students Explain Their Thinking

 

"Math students may not be used to writing in math but in the real world there is no “math day” and you have to explain what your math means. Filling out worksheets of math problems for no purpose is not really a thing for most adults.

"Allison Childers (@mrschilders314 who blogs at shootforthemoonmath.wordpress.com) shared this brainstorm list of journal topics for math with me.

"Check out her types of questions she has students journal. They are not “Find the answer” or “Show your steps.” This is a great way to increase the depth of knowledge and help students get to understand math rather than just do math."

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What If Almost Everything We Thought About The Teaching Of Writing Was Wrong?

What If Almost Everything We Thought About The Teaching Of Writing Was Wrong? | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
Why Do We Write? Language merely reflects our way of trying to make sense of the world. - Frank Smith Frank Smith (1982) says 'writing touches every part of our lives'. One of the first reasons we write is because it is a tool for communication in culture. It gives us the ability to share…

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The 25 Best Films of the 21st Century So Far :: NY Times

The 25 Best Films of the 21st Century So Far :: NY Times | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

"We are now approximately one-sixth of the way through the 21st century, and thousands of movies have already been released. Which means that it’s high time for the sorting – and the fighting – to start. As the chief film critics of The Times, we decided to rank, with some help from cinema savants on Facebook, the top 25 movies that are destined to be the classics of the future. While we’re sure almost everyone will agree with our choices, we’re equally sure that those of you who don’t will let us know."

 

Jim Lerman's insight:

 

I included this article just because it's a good list and I like movies.


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PenPal Schools

PenPal Schools | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

PenPal Schools is a global, online learning community where students age 8 and up can connect with others to collaborate on online projects. PenPal Schools connects over 100,000 students in 170 countries to learn together, discovering cultures and exploring lessons on the environment, science, math, and more. Students do all the work through the PenPal Schools site and begin projects at the same time as their pen pals, so teachers will need to check out upcoming course schedules and plan accordingly. Students write to each other while exploring the learning material and collaborating on assignments. The units range from one to six weeks and come with a schedule and course materials. The lessons are typically 30 minutes long, and a useful teacher dashboard allows teachers to provide feedback and see what students are writing to their pen pals."

 

via Common Sense Education

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Nobel Winner Bob Dylan Releases Speech on How His Words and Songs Relate to Literature

Nobel Winner Bob Dylan Releases Speech on How His Words and Songs Relate to Literature | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
Bob Dylan received the 2016 Nobel Prize in Literature “for having created new poetic expressions within the great American song tradition.” This week, in a recording studio near Los Angeles, he recorded a 27-minute speech discussing the inspiration and arc of his creative life in words, sound and song.

“When I received the Nobel Prize for literature, I got to wondering how my songs related to literature,” Dylan began. “I wanted to reflect on it, and see where the connection was. I’m going to try to articulate that to you. And most likely it will go in a roundabout way, but I hope what I saw will be worthwhile and purposeful.”

Dylan goes back to his start, when Buddy Holly inspired him. He was 18 when Holly died in a plane crash at age 22, he recalls. He felt a kindred spirit, a brother in music who combined country western, rock-n-roll, and rhythm and blues. As Dylan says, “three separate strands of music that he entwined and infused into one genre, one brand.”

The Nobel Foundation has posted a YouTube video of the audio track of Dylan reading his speech with excerpts on the screen, which you can listen to above. It must be listened to, because, Dylan’s words—like poems and songs—must be heard. As he says, words and sounds do strange and pleasing things to those who utter them and those who listen.

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An Illustrated Guide to Writing Scenes and Stories  

An Illustrated Guide to Writing Scenes and Stories   | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
The writing workshop/lecture Wonderbook: Scenes is an edited version, using as its starting point the transcript of a version presented at the Arkansas Book Festival in 2014. Both before that event…

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Sharon Bakar's curator insight, December 30, 2016 6:01 AM
This is a beautifully illustrated guide to writing scenes esp in Fantasy. I treated myself to the book.
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100 Best Writing Websites: 2017 Edition

100 Best Writing Websites: 2017 Edition | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
Make 2017 your best writing year yet with our list of the best writing websites.

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Writers of Color Discussing Craft - An Invisible Archive

Writers of Color Discussing Craft - An Invisible Archive | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

“I often wonder what I’d do if there weren’t any books in the world.”
― James Baldwin, Giovanni’s Room

A few weeks ago I was thinking about how Junot Diaz often comments on the fact he’s almost never asked to speak about craft, and instead always is asked to talk about race, identity, and the immigrant experience. And it’s true — when I think about all the books on writing craft I’ve read or heard about over the years I’m struck by how few POC-authored books on writing I’ve seen.  Are they really that rare? Or are the books and essays out there, but we don’t know where to find them?


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How to Edit a Book: The Ultimate Free 21-Part Checklist

How to Edit a Book: The Ultimate Free 21-Part Checklist | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
If you want people to actually read what you’ve written, you must master the art of ferociously self-editing your book.
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Year-End Roundup, 2016-17 | Questions for Writing and Discussion :: NY Times

Year-End Roundup, 2016-17 | Questions for Writing and Discussion :: NY Times | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
For eight years, we have asked a fresh Student Opinion question every weekday. Each June, just as we do with lesson plans, we round them all up and post them in one place.

Below are the 179 questions we’ve asked between September 2016 and June 2017, all still open to comment by any student 13 or older. Each question is based on — and linked to — articles, videos and images from The New York Times, and each Times article is accessible without a digital subscription. This list is also available by PDF, here.

Students can use these questions to practice writing persuasively or creatively, or as inspiration for our contests. Teachers might use these prompts as jumping-off points for class discussions, as part of their lesson plans, or as encouragement for their students to engage with what’s happening in the world.

At the end of this post we feature our Civil Conversation Challenge lessons, a special student forum and contest held this school year to encourage respectful discourse about some of the biggest issues dividing Americans today, including immigration, guns, climate control, and race, gender and identity.
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Creating Visual Six Word Stories--Ending the School Year with My First Lesson Ever!

Creating Visual Six Word Stories--Ending the School Year with My First Lesson Ever! | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
On June 11, 2009 I taught my demo lesson at Ossining High School. That first lesson focused on creating six word stories, and was the start of my full time teaching career. And eight years later, I ended the school year with the very same lesson--I’ve come full circle.

Back then, we read a few stories together, examined the literary tradition, and created our own. Students wrote them on sentence strips, decorated them, and presented them to the class to publish. I even tracked down my original lesson plan in my files--a screenshot is below. As the legend has it, Ernest Hemingway was asked to write a story in six words. His response: “For sale: Baby shoes, never worn.”

 

Jim Lerman's insight:

 

Quite a thorough description of how Adam Schoenbart does this; very informative.

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Class Tech Tips: 5 Ways To Use Spark Creation Tools To Empower K-12 Learners

Class Tech Tips: 5 Ways To Use Spark Creation Tools To Empower K-12 Learners | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
This past weekend I had the chance to share tips, strategies and lesson ideas for educators looking to empower their students with creation tools. At the Tomorrow’s Classrooms Today Conference in New Jersey I led a session with ways to use the totally free, BYOD-friendly Adobe Spark creation tools. I first started using the Spark creation tools when looking for a way for students to publish their creations on an iPad, Chromebook, or any device with a web-browser.

If you haven’t checked out these three tools before, Spark Post is perfect for making graphics, Spark Video lets students make their own movies, and Spark Page is a powerful and easy tool for creating a website. Click here to access all three free tools or for links to download the iOS apps. In the list below I share five ways to use Spark creation tools to empower students across in any subject area!

 

Jim Lerman's insight:

 

If you haven't encountered Adobe's Spark Tools previously, Monica Burns provides an excellent starting point. The Spark Tools are very powerful, easy to use, and also FREE.

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Sarah McElrath's curator insight, June 20, 10:44 AM
Powerful free creation tools.
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Love Suite by Michela Marino Lerman

Love Suite by Michela Marino Lerman | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

Michela, my daughter, presented her latest show at Joe's Pub in NYC's East Village last evening (6/11/17). See the whole production by clicking on the headline or image above. Of course, I thought it was magnificent. I hope you like it too. The show starts about 2:30 into the recording.


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8 Writing Lessons from Everybody Writes by Ann Handley - Marketo Marketing Blog - Best Practices and Thought Leadership

8 Writing Lessons from Everybody Writes by Ann Handley - Marketo Marketing Blog - Best Practices and Thought Leadership | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
8 writing lessons marketers can learn from Ann Handley's book, Everybody Writes.

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How to improve your business writing skills

How to improve your business writing skills | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
Bad business writing costs $396B every year in lost productivity. Don't be part of it - try these easy ways to improve your business writing skills. 

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First-year writing classes can teach students how to make fact-based arguments (essay)

First-year writing classes can teach students how to make fact-based arguments (essay) | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
Such a class can provide a model for constructive, fact-based public discourse and stand as a model of principled resistance in a “fake news” era, argues John Duffy.
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