Scriveners' Trappings
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5 Tips for Better Storytelling: A Jeff Gomez Recap by Ian Klein

5 Tips for Better Storytelling: A Jeff Gomez Recap by Ian Klein | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

Ian Klein: "At a recent conference on transmedia, or multiplatform storytelling, Starlight Runner Entertainment CEO Jeff Gomez said that stories help us commune with things greater than ourselves."


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Scriveners' Trappings
Aids and resources for creators and teachers of writing, interactive fiction, digital stories, and transmedia
Curated by Jim Lerman
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Voice Recognition Software Finally Beats Humans At Typing, Study Finds

Voice Recognition Software Finally Beats Humans At Typing, Study Finds | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

"Computers have already beaten us at chess, Jeopardy and Go, the ancient board game from Asia. And now, in the raging war with machines, human beings have lost yet another battle — over typing.

Turns out voice recognition software has improved to the point where it is significantly faster and more accurate at producing text on a mobile device than we are at typing on its keyboard. That's according to a new study by Stanford University, the University of Washington and Baidu, the Chinese Internet giant. The study ran tests in English and Mandarin Chinese."

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6 Things Alfred Hitchcock Can Teach You About Writing

6 Things Alfred Hitchcock Can Teach You About Writing | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
“ Alfred Hitchcock was an English film director and producer who worked closely with screenwriters on his films. The master storyteller, born 13 August 1899, died 29 April 1980.”

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Penelope's curator insight, August 16, 12:44 PM
Alfred Hitchcock had the scream theme down pat. These tips, however, could apply to any writing genre to give it a new heartbeat. Great ideas!

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly" ***

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Trivium - Trivium Education.com

Trivium - Trivium Education.com | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

Description by Larry Kim:

 

"Critical thinking is an incredibly important skill, but it’s not often taught in public school curriculum. Brush up on your rhetoric, grammar, and logic with Trivium’s free resources."

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Jim Lerman's curator insight, August 19, 4:14 PM

This site takes the classic subjects of the Trivium and the Quadrivium (the 7 Liberal Arts) quite seriously and provides the reader with textbook-style instruction in each of them. If you want to see what education looked like in the second half of the 19th century in the U.S., this will show you.  Don't miss the 1895 8th grade final exam from Salinas, Kansas if you've not seen it before. Personally, I find the section on Rhetoric quite interesting.

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Lego Story Maker- A Great Digital Storytelling App for kids

Lego Story Maker- A Great Digital Storytelling App for kids | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
Lego Story Maker- A Great Digital Storytelling App for kids
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Lee Hall's curator insight, August 11, 9:51 AM
Let students tell exciting stories using the Lego characters they know.
António Leça Domingues's curator insight, August 12, 4:35 AM
Uma aplicação de LEGO para storytelling.
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A Guide to Producing Better Student Writers and Editors With Dictation Tools (EdSurge News)

A Guide to Producing Better Student Writers and Editors With Dictation Tools (EdSurge News) | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
Learning to use a technology to complete a familiar task in a different way can feel awkward, but like anything, with practice, it becomes fluid. Maybe you’ve tried dictation in the past, and you are waiting for the technology to improve before adopting it. Well, the time has come to try it again. Dictation can offer you—and your students—much more, such as these five items.
Jim Lerman's insight:

The time has certainly arrived for we educators to start incorporating dictation into the classroom. The technology has certainly reached the crossover stage for general use and a number of free apps (include Voice Typing in Google Docs) exist.

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Jim Lerman's curator insight, August 18, 12:22 PM

The time has certainly arrived for we educators to start incorporating dictation into the classroom. The technology has certainly reached the crossover stage for general use and a number of free apps (include Voice Typing in Google Docs) exist.

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The Science of the Story

The Science of the Story | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
We know in our gut when we’re hearing a good story—and research is starting to explain why.
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Is It Story That Makes Us Read? :: New York Magazine (Vulture)

Is It Story That Makes Us Read? :: New York Magazine (Vulture) | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

"What I mean to get across are the thin traces the plots of even the most memorable, near universally read books can leave in our minds. If a work of fiction has any force to it, we close the book with a head full of images, lines, and emotions.

We’ve gotten to know characters and may think of them the way we think of the heroes and villains of our own lives. That sense of them can stay with us for years, even if we forget their names. A good prose style will stay in our ears the way memorable music does. But there’s something that goes away quickly when we close a book, or the screen goes dark, or the curtain falls: the memory of just what happened, in what order, and why. Plots are ghostly things in our brains. It can be hard to keep a grasp of them even as you’re reading a novel or watching a film or a play. I sometimes fret that I have a better memory of the font certain novels were printed in than the incidents that riveted me as I was reading them.

But it’s plot that keeps us turning pages, even when we feel no sympathy or the opposite of sympathy for a fiction’s characters and animating ideas."

Jim Lerman's insight:

A collection of about 6 articles about plot and story with a finely tuned, self-consciously contemporary point of view.

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Jim Lerman's curator insight, August 13, 7:12 PM

This post, largely about plot, has significant relevance as we consider the place of story in VR and AR.

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50 Great Articles and Essays about Writing :: The Electric Typewriter

50 Great Articles and Essays about Writing :: The Electric Typewriter | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
50 Great Articles and Essays about Writing
The best essays on writing -- articles about writing -- essays about writing
Jim Lerman's insight:

I just discovered this very cool website. Tons of great writers and writing.

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10 Mentor Texts to Lift the Level of Students’ Narrative Writing by Stacey Shubitz

10 Mentor Texts to Lift the Level of Students’ Narrative Writing by Stacey Shubitz | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
When I was selecting fiction and nonfiction texts to feature in Craft Moves: Lesson Sets for Teaching Writing with Mentor Texts, I looked for exquisitely written picture books. While searching for the fiction texts, I looked for books that represented a variety of races, cultures, and sexual orientations since I believe all students deserve to read mirror books, in which they can see themselves, and window books, in which they can learn about others (Bishop, 1990). If we make conscious choices about the mentor texts we present to students – in terms of showcasing impeccable writing and a range of human experiences – then we broaden children’s perspectives while helping them become better writers.

"Nearly every picture book could serve as a mentor text to help students become better writers. However, some books offer more value than others. Typically, I examine picture books through a lens based on the qualities of good writing: meaning, genre, structure, detail, voice, and contentions (Anderson, 2005). Over the years, I’ve come up with ten power craft moves for books that are based on the things I hope to see in children’s writing, to help me determine what I can teach young writers from picture books. Every picture book I adopt as a mentor text must have at least six power craft moves. With six or more power craft moves, I can use each of the selected picture books in a variety of conferences, small group strategy lessons, and mini-lessons."

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Jim Lerman's curator insight, August 7, 1:59 AM

Very thoughtful and rich suggestions. Excellent.

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Nobel Laureate Alice Munro on the Secret of a Great Story

Nobel Laureate Alice Munro on the Secret of a Great Story | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
A story is not like a road to follow … it’s more like a house. You go inside and stay there for a while, wandering back and forth and settling where you like and discovering how the room and corridors relate to each other, how the world outside is altered by being viewed from these windows. And you, the visitor, the reader, are altered as well by being in this enclosed space, whether it is ample and easy or full of crooked turns, or sparsely or opulently furnished. You can go back again and again, and the house, the story, always contains more than you saw the last time. It also has a sturdy sense of itself of being built out of its own necessity, not just to shelter or beguile you.
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Free personality test, type descriptions, relationship and career advice | 16Personalities

Free personality test, type descriptions, relationship and career advice | 16Personalities | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

"Since the dawn of time, we have tried to describe and categorize ourselves in many ways. From the four temperaments of the Ancient civilizations – sanguine, choleric, melancholic and phlegmatic – to the latest advances in psychology, people have been restless in their pursuit of a good, reliable way to fit something as complex and fluid as human personality into a well-defined model. We are still some time away from being able to do that, although the current models account for the majority of our personality traits and can often predict with a high degree of confidence how we are likely to behave in specific circumstances."

 


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16 Personalities will yield a gold mine of character types for those searching for ways to build the populations of their fictional creations, and may assist in understanding people who populate non-fiction work.

 

This website offers a free assessment that resembles the well known Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, yielding a profile that may be personally helpful and/or at least interesting. The site also includes a paid option that yields a deeper and more thorough profile. The introductory section titled "Our Theory" gives a brief background on how the 16 Personalities site came to be.

 

For those interested in a little arm-chair personal analysis, this site appears relatively responsible and trustworthy. Judging from the graphics (which include only Caucasian-looking people), the site may, or may not, be a bit limited in terms of consideration of cultural, or other dimensions, of diversity.

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Jim Lerman's curator insight, July 31, 12:50 PM

This website offers a free assessment that resembles the well known Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, yielding a profile that may be personally helpful and/or at least interesting. The site also includes a paid option that yields a deeper and more thorough profile. The introductory section titled "Our Theory" gives a brief background on how the 16 Personalities site came to be.

 

For those interested in a little arm-chair personal analysis, this site appears relatively responsible and trustworthy. Judging from the graphics (which include only Caucasian-looking people), the site may, or may not, be a bit limited in terms of consideration of cultural, or other dimensions, of diversity.

Jim Lerman's curator insight, July 31, 12:51 PM

This website offers a free assessment that resembles the well known Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, yielding a profile that may be personally helpful and/or at least interesting. The site also includes a paid option that yields a deeper and more thorough profile. The introductory section titled "Our Theory" gives a brief background on how the 16 Personalities site came to be.

 

For those interested in a little arm-chair personal analysis, this site appears relatively responsible and trustworthy. Judging from the graphics (which include only Caucasian-looking people), the site may, or may not, be a bit limited in terms of consideration of cultural, or other dimensions, of diversity.

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Write the World

Write the World | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
Welcome to Write the World! We offer a range of tools and resources to help you create a vibrant writing community within your classroom. As educators ourselves, we understand the exciting (and challenging) task of engaging young people in the writing process. We also understand how little time teachers have when it comes to finding fresh material, developing resources, and implementing creative writing into an already packed curriculum. We’re here to help.
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The 5 Essential Elements Of A Perfect Ending

The 5 Essential Elements Of A Perfect Ending | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

"We can divide a story into a beginning, which is roughly a quarter of a book, a middle, which is half the book, and an end, which is the last quarter. This last part of your book is your reader’s reward for going on this journey with you. It is the part we remember because it has, or should have, the most drama in it. 

"Here are five tips, which all of these authors used, that will help you to end a story so that readers will want to read your next book."

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Pixar’s 22 Golden Rules of Storytelling: TwisterSifter.com

Pixar’s 22 Golden Rules of Storytelling: TwisterSifter.com | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
In 2011, then Pixar storyboard artist Emma Coats, tweeted 22 rules of storytelling. Artist Dino Ignacio then turned them into image macros.

Via Laura Brown, Lynnette Van Dyke, Penelope
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Penelope's curator insight, July 21, 11:36 AM
You may have already seen these rules of storytelling, but they are worth a refresher. Plus, now they've been married to some beautiful images from beloved Pixar films. My brain loves these visuals. Enjoy!

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly" *** 

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5 Tips for Making Writing a Daily Habit - LiveWriteThrive.com

5 Tips for Making Writing a Daily Habit - LiveWriteThrive.com | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
5 Tips for Making Writing a Daily Habit gives writers helpful tips on how to write daily.

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Martim Neto Mariano's curator insight, August 19, 7:25 AM
5 dicas para fazer da escrita um hábito diário
Savaniah McNulty Villmer's curator insight, August 23, 11:19 PM
...I want to write in my blog daily
Sofy Bertel's curator insight, August 24, 12:13 AM
First of all, when I saw this article  I considered that it´s really important for us inasmuch as we are in a process of making our thesis project in which we need to practice and improve our writing skills in order to make a great final job. This writer give us 5 interesting tips for making writing as part of a daily routine in our lifes. She says that the importance to write grows when we set a goal, we don't put limits, we always have a pen and paper in our hands, we take advantage of time and we have self-discipline and be responsable.
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Lego Story Maker- A Great Digital Storytelling App for kids

Lego Story Maker- A Great Digital Storytelling App for kids | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
Lego Story Maker- A Great Digital Storytelling App for kids
Via Lee Hall, Rui Guimarães Lima, Jim Lerman
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Lee Hall's curator insight, August 11, 9:51 AM
Let students tell exciting stories using the Lego characters they know.
António Leça Domingues's curator insight, August 12, 4:35 AM
Uma aplicação de LEGO para storytelling.
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Creativity in English LAnguage Teaching 

Creativity in English LAnguage Teaching  | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
The book Creativity in English Language Teaching edited by Daniel Xerri and Odette Vassallo is available to download by clicking on the image below:  ​

 

FREE DOWNLOAD. FROM THE TABLE OF CONTENTS, THIS LOOKS LIKE QUITE AN INTERESTING VOLUME. -JL

 

Thanks to Nik Peachey for this link.

Jim Lerman's insight:

From the Foreword:

 

"WHY DO WE NEED ANOTHER BOOK ABOUT CREATIVITY?

We need another book because questions about creative language teaching are re-ignited by every teacher in every classroom in every country. Each time a language teacher enters a class, a silent experiment in hope and creativity is taking place: hope that the lesson will make a difference to at least one of its learners in some way; creativity in that teachers strive to give the lesson something of their own that goes beyond imitation or compliance. The teachers who describe their last lesson with a sparkle in their eye, rarely describe the joys of “doing what they are told” by the course book or the test paper. Instead they describe a sense of doing something of worth, and making a difference to their learners (Bell, 1995; Johnstone, 2009; Tsui, 2009). This is why we will never run out of the need for teachers to tell us their stories about what they did, why, and how they know it worked."

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Jim Lerman's curator insight, August 18, 12:34 PM

From the Foreword:

 

"WHY DO WE NEED ANOTHER BOOK ABOUT CREATIVITY?

We need another book because questions about creative language teaching are re-ignited by every teacher in every classroom in every country. Each time a language teacher enters a class, a silent experiment in hope and creativity is taking place: hope that the lesson will make a difference to at least one of its learners in some way; creativity in that teachers strive to give the lesson something of their own that goes beyond imitation or compliance. The teachers who describe their last lesson with a sparkle in their eye, rarely describe the joys of “doing what they are told” by the course book or the test paper. Instead they describe a sense of doing something of worth, and making a difference to their learners (Bell, 1995; Johnstone, 2009; Tsui, 2009). This is why we will never run out of the need for teachers to tell us their stories about what they did, why, and how they know it worked."

Jim Lerman's curator insight, August 18, 2:57 PM

From the Foreword:

 

"WHY DO WE NEED ANOTHER BOOK ABOUT CREATIVITY?

We need another book because questions about creative language teaching are re-ignited by every teacher in every classroom in every country. Each time a language teacher enters a class, a silent experiment in hope and creativity is taking place: hope that the lesson will make a difference to at least one of its learners in some way; creativity in that teachers strive to give the lesson something of their own that goes beyond imitation or compliance. The teachers who describe their last lesson with a sparkle in their eye, rarely describe the joys of “doing what they are told” by the course book or the test paper. Instead they describe a sense of doing something of worth, and making a difference to their learners (Bell, 1995; Johnstone, 2009; Tsui, 2009). This is why we will never run out of the need for teachers to tell us their stories about what they did, why, and how they know it worked."

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� Beginners: How To Start Building an Audience on Medium (From Scratch)? — The Coffeelicious — Medium

� Beginners: How To Start Building an Audience on Medium (From Scratch)? — The Coffeelicious — Medium | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
What you write is legit. And you want to be read. I will help you with that!
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Writing Tools for Success: 5 Sites That Make Writing Easier

Writing Tools for Success: 5 Sites That Make Writing Easier | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
Learn how the writing tools for success in this post will help you come up with compelling blog post titles, collaborate with like-minded writers, and more.

Learn how the writing tools for success in this post will help you come up with compelling blog post titles, collaborate with like-minded writers, and more.


Via Venkatesh Iyer (venkyiyer.com), Shannon Bolithoe
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The Electric Typewriter

The Electric Typewriter | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

Description by Kim Ukura

 

"One of my recent favorite sources for online essays is The Electric Typewriter, which collects “selected features, articles and essays from the world’s best journalists and writers.”

Each day, the editors post several essays — a mixture of new and old — on a whole host of topics. They’re often the kinds of essays that can make a reader deeply fascinated in a subject you never knew enough to care about, my favorite kind.

Their best feature, however, has to be their collection of reading lists. For many, editors have collected 10 to 30 of the best essays on a particular topic — work, the environment, sex — in one place. Most lists are broken down further by topic, and each listing includes a brief summary of the article to help pick the ones that might be most interesting."

 

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New Teacher Series/ Question 10: What are the best strategies for teaching writing?

New Teacher Series/ Question 10: What are the best strategies for teaching writing? | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
So how are we to manage this Herculean task?

You must be a writer yourself.  I feel everything that needs to be said about the importance of English teachers to be active readers and writers has already been said by great teachers, like Nanci Atwell  (In The Middle) and Penny Kittle (Write Beside Them). Writing with your students makes you humble in the face of the staggering, monumental task you are asking them to accomplish. Writing is dynamic, not a set of static concepts students learn once and master.  To understand the struggles of writing, you don’t have to be a published author, you just have to write on a regular basis. You can’t teach writing from a position of theory.  You must have a process and projects of your own.  If not, you are in an untenable position to support students with the overwhelming number of decisions with which they will be faced.
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The Agony of the Artist (with a capital A): E.E. Cummings on What It Really Means to Be an Artist and His Little-Known Line Drawings

The Agony of the Artist (with a capital A): E.E. Cummings on What It Really Means to Be an Artist and His Little-Known Line Drawings | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

"Look into yourself, reader, for you must find Art there, if at all… Art is not something which may or may not be acquired, it is something which you are not or which you are. If a thorough search of yourself fails to reveal the presence of this something, you may be perfectly sure that no amount of striving, academic or otherwise, can bring it into your life. But if you are this something — then, gentle reader, no amount of discrimination and misapprehension can possibly prevent you from becoming an Artist. To be sure, you will not encounter “success,” but you will experience what is a thousand times sweeter than “success.” You will know that when all’s said and done (and the very biggest Butter Baron has bought the very last and least Velasquez) “to become an Artist” means nothing: whereas to become alive, or one’s self, means everything."

"Or, as Sherwood Anderson wrote three decades earlier his magnificent letter of life-advice to his son, “The thing of course, is to make yourself alive. Most people remain all of their lives in a stupor. The point of being an artist is that you may live.”

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The Four Desires Driving All Human Behavior: Bertrand Russell’s Magnificent Nobel Prize Acceptance Speech :: Maria Popova

The Four Desires Driving All Human Behavior: Bertrand Russell’s Magnificent Nobel Prize Acceptance Speech :: Maria Popova | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

[Bertrand Russell's 1950 Nobel Prize] "acceptance speech is one of the finest packets of human thought ever delivered from a stage."

 

He begins by stating that all human behavior is driven by desire. "Russell points to four such infinite desires — acquisitiveness, rivalry, vanity, and love of power — and examines them in order:"

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N'Quavah Velazquez, EdD's curator insight, August 2, 8:05 AM
"He begins by stating that all human behavior is driven by desire. "Russell points to four such infinite desires — acquisitiveness, rivalry, vanity, and love of power — and examines them in order:"
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How Robots in English Class Can Spark Empathy and Improve Writing

How Robots in English Class Can Spark Empathy and Improve Writing | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
Mention robots to many English teachers and they’ll immediately point down the hall to the science classroom or to the makerspace, if they have one. At many schools, if there’s a robot at all, it’s located in a science or math classroom or is being built by an after-school robotics club. It’s not usually a fixture in English classrooms. But as teachers continue to work at finding new entry points to old material for their students, robots are proving to be a great interdisciplinary tool that builds collaboration and literacy skills.

“For someone like me who teaches literature by lots of dead white guys, teaching programming adds relevance to my class,” said Jessica Herring, a high school English teacher at Benton High School in Arkansas. Herring first experimented using Sphero, essentially a programmable ball, when her American literature class was studying the writing of early settlers. Herring pushed the desks back and drew a maze on the floor with tape representing the journey from Europe to the New World. Her students used class iPads and an introductory manually guided app to steer their Spheros through the maze.
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Corbett Harrison Always Write: Writing Lessons for Writing Teachers

Corbett Harrison Always Write: Writing Lessons for Writing Teachers | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, July 30, 12:29 PM

Here's a LAST chance to download free materials from Corbett Harrison's presentations on:

 

  • Writer's notebooks, mentor texts, and lesson design for K-6 
  • Writing Across the Curriculum (no plagiarism!) & Vocabulary strategies for 5-12
  • Writing Across the Curriculum (no plagiarism!) & Vocabulary strategies for 5-1
  • Love the Language, Writer's Notebooks, and Sentence Structures