Scriveners' Trappings
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Scriveners' Trappings
Aids and resources for creators and teachers of writing, interactive fiction, digital stories, and transmedia
Curated by Jim Lerman
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Story Arc | A Simple Way to Understand and Plot Your Novel

Story Arc | A Simple Way to Understand and Plot Your Novel | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
A story arc is the chain on which the pearls, or scenes, of your novel are strung. The story arc--or narrative arc--is the same thing as "plot."

Via Penelope, Sarah McElrath
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Penelope's curator insight, August 2, 2016 7:15 PM
Simply explained, this article is a great keeper to explain story arc. What it is, why it's important, and how to use it to make your novels pop with tension.

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly" ***


Sarah McElrath's curator insight, August 4, 2016 10:21 PM
Helpful way to understand and organize plot.
Rescooped by Jim Lerman from Writing Rightly
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Pixar’s 22 Golden Rules of Storytelling: TwisterSifter.com

Pixar’s 22 Golden Rules of Storytelling: TwisterSifter.com | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
In 2011, then Pixar storyboard artist Emma Coats, tweeted 22 rules of storytelling. Artist Dino Ignacio then turned them into image macros.

Via Laura Brown, Lynnette Van Dyke, Penelope
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Penelope's curator insight, July 21, 2016 11:36 AM
You may have already seen these rules of storytelling, but they are worth a refresher. Plus, now they've been married to some beautiful images from beloved Pixar films. My brain loves these visuals. Enjoy!

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly" *** 

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Getting to the Core of Character Motivation

Getting to the Core of Character Motivation | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
Getting to the Core of Character Motivation is a guest post by Becca Puglisi detailing inner and outer motivation of characters in fiction

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Penelope's curator insight, June 7, 2016 9:46 PM
Developing characters in our stories is one of the hardest things to get right. This is an excellent post that explains the character arc, which consists of four pieces. Worthwhile read.

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly" ***

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Resources for Writers: Tips for Writing Effective Dialogue

Resources for Writers: Tips for Writing Effective Dialogue | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

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Penelope's curator insight, May 21, 2013 12:15 AM

 

Yackety Yak. Blah Blah Blah. We talk every day and in every way. Is it always effective talking? Not really. But when it comes to our writing of dialogue inside of our stories, it better be.

 

When a writer goes on for a page or two or three describing what kind of coffee a character is going to order at the cafe, my eyes start to roll back in my head, and I am more than likely to slam the door on that story.

 

Dialogue is war! If you write dialogue--make it tight--and make it right! Make sure it is going to advance your story. I am still basking in the "afterglow" of all of the wonderful dialogue and storytelling from the remake of the "Great Gatsby" movie. Ah, but that is a post for another day.

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article: http://jodierennerediting.blogspot.com/2010/08/tips-for-writing-effective-dialogue.html

 

 

Jacques Goyette's curator insight, May 21, 2013 3:13 PM

very instructive advice. De bons conseils pour écrire des dialogues réalistes.

Penelope's comment, May 21, 2013 3:17 PM
Merci'!
Rescooped by Jim Lerman from Feed the Writer
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Story Arc | A Simple Way to Understand and Plot Your Novel

Story Arc | A Simple Way to Understand and Plot Your Novel | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
A story arc is the chain on which the pearls, or scenes, of your novel are strung. The story arc--or narrative arc--is the same thing as "plot."

Via Penelope, Sarah McElrath
more...
Penelope's curator insight, August 2, 2016 7:15 PM
Simply explained, this article is a great keeper to explain story arc. What it is, why it's important, and how to use it to make your novels pop with tension.

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly" ***


Sarah McElrath's curator insight, August 4, 2016 10:21 PM
Helpful way to understand and organize plot.
Rescooped by Jim Lerman from Writing Rightly
Scoop.it!

Pixar’s 22 Golden Rules of Storytelling: TwisterSifter.com

Pixar’s 22 Golden Rules of Storytelling: TwisterSifter.com | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
In 2011, then Pixar storyboard artist Emma Coats, tweeted 22 rules of storytelling. Artist Dino Ignacio then turned them into image macros.

Via Laura Brown, Lynnette Van Dyke, Penelope
more...
Penelope's curator insight, July 21, 2016 11:36 AM
You may have already seen these rules of storytelling, but they are worth a refresher. Plus, now they've been married to some beautiful images from beloved Pixar films. My brain loves these visuals. Enjoy!

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly" *** 

Rescooped by Jim Lerman from Writing Rightly
Scoop.it!

Write great dialogue scenes in 7 steps - Writing Rightly

Write great dialogue scenes in 7 steps - Writing Rightly | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

"Of all the scenes we write, dialogue is the most complex and rich. Most writers I know take several passes to get it right."


Penelope Silver's insight:


"Dialogue is one of those tricky areas that trip up many authors--myself included. As I am writing my first romance novel, I run into areas such as:

 

"How much dialogue is enough?

When and where should you insert dialogue?

When should you move from narrator consciousness to talking?

How long should you make the responses?

 

"Author Roz Morris gives us seven simple steps to writing great dialogue. You would think most would seem obvious, but some of them are real ah ha! moments. I really appreciate these tips:

 

"VISUALS - People move as they talk. They shrug, make faces, cook, clean, etc. Create a picture in your reader's mind. This will create a richer, more dramatic scene.

 

"REACTIONS - Are the characters reacting and talking or does their internal dialogue evaporate when they start being vocal?

 

"DECLUTTER - Think of your reader when you write dialogue. Readers scan through these scenes quickly, and don't need to be told of every breath and blink. Let your scene sit for a few days, and go back at it with fresh eyes to take out the fat.

 

"Head on over to the article to read four more great tips!"

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article:http://nailyournovel.wordpress.com/2013/04/28/write-great-dialogue-scenes-in-7-steps



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Penelope's curator insight, August 12, 2013 2:17 PM

 

Dialogue is one of those tricky areas that trip up many authors--myself included. As I am writing my first romance novel, I run into areas such as:

 

How much dialogue is enough?

When and where should you insert dialogue?

When should you move from narrator consciousness to talking?

How long should you make the responses?

 

Author Roz Morris gives us seven simple steps to writing great dialogue. You would think most would seem obvious, but some of them are real ah ha! moments. I really appreciate these tips:

 

VISUALS - People move as they talk. They shrug, make faces, cook, clean, etc. Create a picture in your reader's mind. This will create a richer, more dramatic scene.

 

REACTIONS - Are the characters reacting and talking or does their internal dialogue evaporate when they start being vocal?

 

DECLUTTER - Think of your reader when you write dialogue. Readers scan through these scenes quickly, and don't need to be told of every breath and blink. Let your scene sit for a few days, and go back at it with fresh eyes to take out the fat.

 

Header on over to the article to read four more great tips!

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article: http://nailyournovel.wordpress.com/2013/04/28/write-great-dialogue-scenes-in-7-steps

 

Editing in Paradise's curator insight, August 12, 2013 5:30 PM

What on earth are they saying? With this excellent advice, you can bet it it's worth listening to.