Scriveners' Trappings
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Scriveners' Trappings
Aids and resources for creators and teachers of writing, interactive fiction, digital stories, and transmedia
Curated by Jim Lerman
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NaNoWriMo: Planning a Novel with Evernote Templates Medium.com

NaNoWriMo: Planning a Novel with Evernote Templates Medium.com | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

In November, nearly half a million people around the world will embark on a remarkable quest. National Novel Writing Month. 


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Penelope's curator insight, October 14, 2016 12:20 PM
Fiction writing can be a daunting challenge for even the most talented. Facing a blank page can snuff out creative sparks that once burned brightly. 

Enter Evernote. I use this powerful tool all the time for clipping web pages, PDF's, etc. Evernote has created six powerful templates found inside this article that can be saved and used to the NANO writer's advantage. A little planning may get the timid writing instead of quaking. Super tool to add to your writing arsenal.

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

Sarah McElrath's curator insight, October 15, 2016 9:48 AM
For Evernote fans--or beginners--some templates to use during NANOWRMO
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6 Things Alfred Hitchcock Can Teach You About Writing

6 Things Alfred Hitchcock Can Teach You About Writing | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
“ Alfred Hitchcock was an English film director and producer who worked closely with screenwriters on his films. The master storyteller, born 13 August 1899, died 29 April 1980.”

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Penelope's curator insight, August 16, 2016 12:44 PM
Alfred Hitchcock had the scream theme down pat. These tips, however, could apply to any writing genre to give it a new heartbeat. Great ideas!

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly" ***

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Pixar’s 22 Golden Rules of Storytelling: TwisterSifter.com

Pixar’s 22 Golden Rules of Storytelling: TwisterSifter.com | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
In 2011, then Pixar storyboard artist Emma Coats, tweeted 22 rules of storytelling. Artist Dino Ignacio then turned them into image macros.

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Penelope's curator insight, July 21, 2016 11:36 AM
You may have already seen these rules of storytelling, but they are worth a refresher. Plus, now they've been married to some beautiful images from beloved Pixar films. My brain loves these visuals. Enjoy!

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly" *** 

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7 Simple Edits That Make Your Writing 100% More Powerful - Smartblogger.com

7 Simple Edits That Make Your Writing 100% More Powerful - Smartblogger.com | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
Ever wonder why your writing lacks the impact of your writing heroes? Find out the simple secret they don't want you to know.

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Penelope's curator insight, June 15, 2016 9:40 PM
This is an amazing post. Yes, the writing is crisp and concise, but the editing visual at the beginning is a stand-alone lesson. Every writer needs to bookmark this one!

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly" ***

Link to the original article: https://smartblogger.com/editing-tips/



'Timothy Leyfer's curator insight, June 16, 2016 8:06 PM
Here are 7 Simple Tips To Increase The Power Of Your Writing
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Spark Creativity with the Plot Generator

Spark Creativity with the Plot Generator | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
Are your students going to write short story, film script or novel in the near future? Then send them to the Plot Generator for some inspiration! This free web tool features generators for various kinds of writing projects in a wide range of genres including fantasy, mystery, romance, teen... http://elearningfeeds.com/spark-creativity-with-the-plot-generator/

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The 100 Best Websites for Writers in 2016

The 100 Best Websites for Writers in 2016 | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

"No matter what you want to accomplish in 2016, we’re sure you’ll find quality inspiration and resources.


"We’ve broken this year’s list into seven categories: Blogging, entrepreneurship, creativity and craft, freelancing, marketing, publishing, and writing communities. All sites are listed in alphabetical order within their categories, and the numbers are for easy tracking (not ranking)."


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A. G. Moye's curator insight, January 26, 2016 3:06 PM

Anything to help get your career rolling in writing. 

Penelope's curator insight, January 27, 2016 1:56 PM

 

Great resource for writers--beginners and pros alike!

 

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article: http://thewritelife.com/100-best-websites-writers-2016/

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How to Use Foreshadowing - Helping Writers Become Authors - Writing Rightly

How to Use Foreshadowing - Helping Writers Become Authors - Writing Rightly | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
If we sift foreshadowing down to its simplest form, we could say it prepares readers for what will happen later in the story.

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Penelope's curator insight, January 14, 2014 12:35 AM

 

We hear lots about point of view, plot and climax, but what about foreshadowing? This very important element of a story seems to have been relegated to a back room and stuffed in the closet.

 

In its simplest form? It prepares readers for what will happen in the story. I'm sure you've read books where at the point of a major plot twist, you shake your head and say, huh? We all have. You feel cheated and want to snap that book shut!

 

There are two parts:

 

Part 1: The Plant    (Blantant or Subtle Hints)

Part 2: The Payoff (Important Scenes Play Out)

 

Foreshadowing can ease readers into what is going to happen. Sneak it in like pureed veggies, but don't hit readers over the head with it. This way, when you execute your plot twist, your readers will be delighted--not disgusted.

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article: http://www.helpingwritersbecomeauthors.com/2013/04/how-to-use-foreshadowing.html

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27 Pieces Of Advice For Writers From Famous Authors

27 Pieces Of Advice For Writers From Famous Authors | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
Celebrated authors, editors and illustrators write advice to young writers on their hands for " Shared Worlds ," a two-week creative writing summer camp at Wofford College.

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Jacques Goyette's curator insight, April 25, 2013 7:41 PM

Very good advice from bestselling authors.

Jacques Goyette's comment, April 26, 2013 7:56 PM
A lot of people seem to appreciate this article. Keep up the good work Penelope.
Penelope's comment, April 26, 2013 9:48 PM
Thanks, Jacques! These articles are fun to seek out and read! :)
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5 Tips for Making Writing a Daily Habit - LiveWriteThrive.com

5 Tips for Making Writing a Daily Habit - LiveWriteThrive.com | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
5 Tips for Making Writing a Daily Habit gives writers helpful tips on how to write daily.

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Martim Neto Mariano's curator insight, August 19, 2016 7:25 AM
5 dicas para fazer da escrita um hábito diário
Savaniah McNulty Villmer's curator insight, August 23, 2016 11:19 PM
...I want to write in my blog daily
Sofy Bertel's curator insight, August 24, 2016 12:13 AM
First of all, when I saw this article  I considered that it´s really important for us inasmuch as we are in a process of making our thesis project in which we need to practice and improve our writing skills in order to make a great final job. This writer give us 5 interesting tips for making writing as part of a daily routine in our lifes. She says that the importance to write grows when we set a goal, we don't put limits, we always have a pen and paper in our hands, we take advantage of time and we have self-discipline and be responsable.
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Story Arc | A Simple Way to Understand and Plot Your Novel

Story Arc | A Simple Way to Understand and Plot Your Novel | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
A story arc is the chain on which the pearls, or scenes, of your novel are strung. The story arc--or narrative arc--is the same thing as "plot."

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Penelope's curator insight, August 2, 2016 7:15 PM
Simply explained, this article is a great keeper to explain story arc. What it is, why it's important, and how to use it to make your novels pop with tension.

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly" ***


Sarah McElrath's curator insight, August 4, 2016 10:21 PM
Helpful way to understand and organize plot.
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Pixar’s 22 Golden Rules of Storytelling: TwisterSifter.com

Pixar’s 22 Golden Rules of Storytelling: TwisterSifter.com | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
In 2011, then Pixar storyboard artist Emma Coats, tweeted 22 rules of storytelling. Artist Dino Ignacio then turned them into image macros.

Via Laura Brown, Lynnette Van Dyke, Penelope
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Penelope's curator insight, July 21, 2016 11:36 AM
You may have already seen these rules of storytelling, but they are worth a refresher. Plus, now they've been married to some beautiful images from beloved Pixar films. My brain loves these visuals. Enjoy!

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly" *** 

Rescooped by Jim Lerman from Writing Rightly
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Getting to the Core of Character Motivation

Getting to the Core of Character Motivation | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
Getting to the Core of Character Motivation is a guest post by Becca Puglisi detailing inner and outer motivation of characters in fiction

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Penelope's curator insight, June 7, 2016 9:46 PM
Developing characters in our stories is one of the hardest things to get right. This is an excellent post that explains the character arc, which consists of four pieces. Worthwhile read.

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly" ***

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Why Writers Are the Worst Procrastinators - The Atlantic

Why Writers Are the Worst Procrastinators - The Atlantic | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

The psychological origins of waiting (... and waiting, and waiting) to work.


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Chris Simon's curator insight, February 4, 2016 4:01 AM

Non, vous n'êtes pas le seul à procrastiner ! ;-)

Sara Rosett's curator insight, February 4, 2016 11:15 AM

Sara's thoughts:  really interesting article on mindset and how it impacts work.

#tw

Helen Teague's curator insight, February 5, 2016 8:15 AM

"Forced into a challenge we're not prepared for, we often engage 'self-handicapping': deliberately doing things that set us up for failure." By

Megan McArdle

 

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Be a Happy Writer: 10 Ideas for Writing Businesses You Can Start Today - Angela Booth's Fab Freelance Writing Blog

Be a Happy Writer: 10 Ideas for Writing Businesses You Can Start Today - Angela Booth's Fab Freelance Writing Blog | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

There’s never in the history of the world been a better time to be a writer. You can write what you like. No one will burn you at the stake for your ideas. The biggest benefit of all: you’ve got the Internet. It’s a virtual world.


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Penelope's curator insight, September 2, 2014 1:59 PM

 

You can be a writer and you can making a living from it, but it may take a little savvy on your part. If you're fresh out of ideas of where you could sell your literary wares, this article could give you a jump start.

 

There are several very creative niches I knew nothing about. Find one, and get started on your writing career!

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article: http://www.fabfreelancewriting.com/blog/2013/10/15/be-a-happy-writer-10-ideas-for-writing-businesses-you-can-start-today/

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Scribophile - Writing Rightly

Scribophile - Writing Rightly | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

"He Said, She Said: Dialog Tags and Using Them Effectively."

by D.M. Johnson

-------------------


Penelope Silver's insight:

 

Dialogue can trip up even the most seasoned of writers. You can read about it all day long, but until you're actually writing and needing to use dialogue tags (or speech tags), you'll probably skip over this stuff.

 

Think of these tags as signposts, pointing to who is actually doing the talking. Each tag contains at least one noun or pronoun. (said, asked, whispered, remarked).

 

Susannah said

the clerk asked

she said and took off her coat

he said, looking sad

 

As I am writing my current novel, I sail merrily along, adding in some dialogue tags with ease, and getting myself mired in the mud at others.

 

Do I use he said or she said? Where does that comma go? Should I use a more expressive tag?

 

One thing to keep in mind: the "he/she said," or "he/she asked" will disappear in the reader's mind, while adding in an expressive tag will make it stick out like a sore thumb.

 

Read on if you, too, need a college lesson in drumming up the proper speech tag.

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article:http://www.scribophile.com/academy/he-said-she-said-dialog-tags-and-using-them-effectively


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Penelope's curator insight, October 30, 2013 6:01 PM

 

Dialogue can trip up even the most seasoned of writers. You can read about it all day long, but until you're actually writing and needing to use dialogue tags (or speech tags), you'll probably skip over this stuff.

 

Think of these tags as signposts, pointing to who is actually doing the talking. Each tag contains at least one noun or pronoun. (said, asked, whispered, remarked).

 

Susannah said

the clerk asked

she said and took off her coat

he said, looking sad

 

As I am writing my current novel, I sail merrily along, adding in some dialogue tags with ease, and getting myself mired in the mud at others.

 

Do I use he said or she said? Where does that comma go? Should I use a more expressive tag?

 

One thing to keep in mind: the "he/she said," or "he/she asked" will disappear in the reader's mind, while adding in an expressive tag will make it stick out like a sore thumb.

 

Read on if you, too, need a college lesson in drumming up the proper speech tag.

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article: http://www.scribophile.com/academy/he-said-she-said-dialog-tags-and-using-them-effectively

 

Jacques Goyette's curator insight, October 31, 2013 4:44 PM

Tis is how dialog tags should be used.