Scriveners' Trappings
46.4K views | +6 today
Follow
Scriveners' Trappings
Aids and resources for creators and teachers of writing, interactive fiction, digital stories, and transmedia
Curated by Jim Lerman
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Jim Lerman from Education, Curiosity, and Happiness
Scoop.it!

195 Powerful Verbs That'll Instantly Spice Up Your Writing

195 Powerful Verbs That'll Instantly Spice Up Your Writing | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
Good writing is about well-chosen nouns and powerful verbs, not adjectives and adverbs. What constitutes a tired verb? Here’s what to look for:

Via Penelope, Ivon Prefontaine, PhD
more...
Penelope's curator insight, May 31, 11:50 AM
Dynamic tips to metamorphose your writing from meh to meow! 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, May 31, 12:03 PM
When I wrote and re-wrote my rubrics, I used verbs to create an action for students. It was also a great grammar lesson when we went over the rubrics. Verbs and action drive good writing.
Agi Anderson's curator insight, June 15, 6:16 AM
Worthy read about the Power of verbs!
Rescooped by Jim Lerman from Writing Rightly
Scoop.it!

How To Write An Amazing Plot Twist

How To Write An Amazing Plot Twist | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
I love a good page turner. There are few things more satisfying to me then starting a book and not physically being able to put it down. So much so that you look up from said book only to realize that you've been in your pajamas all day, and now it's nighttime. Such was the wonderful…

Via Penelope
more...
Penelope's curator insight, February 15, 10:17 PM
I absolutely love stories that stand up the hair on your arms--those rare plots where you never know what's lurking around each corner and senses are firing on all cylinders.

Want to know how to write your own creeper? This article gives us some really great ideas for a whiplash of a ride sure to thrill the reader.

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, May 20, 12:39 PM
I like the idea of starting with something that you never pull off. Students could buy into that.
Rescooped by Jim Lerman from Writing Rightly
Scoop.it!

NaNoWriMo: Planning a Novel with Evernote Templates Medium.com

NaNoWriMo: Planning a Novel with Evernote Templates Medium.com | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

In November, nearly half a million people around the world will embark on a remarkable quest. National Novel Writing Month. 


Via Penelope
more...
Penelope's curator insight, October 14, 2016 12:20 PM
Fiction writing can be a daunting challenge for even the most talented. Facing a blank page can snuff out creative sparks that once burned brightly. 

Enter Evernote. I use this powerful tool all the time for clipping web pages, PDF's, etc. Evernote has created six powerful templates found inside this article that can be saved and used to the NANO writer's advantage. A little planning may get the timid writing instead of quaking. Super tool to add to your writing arsenal.

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

Sarah McElrath's curator insight, October 15, 2016 9:48 AM
For Evernote fans--or beginners--some templates to use during NANOWRMO
Rescooped by Jim Lerman from Writing Rightly
Scoop.it!

5 Tips for Making Writing a Daily Habit - LiveWriteThrive.com

5 Tips for Making Writing a Daily Habit - LiveWriteThrive.com | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
5 Tips for Making Writing a Daily Habit gives writers helpful tips on how to write daily.

Via Penelope
more...
Martim Neto Mariano's curator insight, August 19, 2016 7:25 AM
5 dicas para fazer da escrita um hábito diário
Savaniah McNulty Villmer's curator insight, August 23, 2016 11:19 PM
...I want to write in my blog daily
Sofy Bertel's curator insight, August 24, 2016 12:13 AM
First of all, when I saw this article  I considered that it´s really important for us inasmuch as we are in a process of making our thesis project in which we need to practice and improve our writing skills in order to make a great final job. This writer give us 5 interesting tips for making writing as part of a daily routine in our lifes. She says that the importance to write grows when we set a goal, we don't put limits, we always have a pen and paper in our hands, we take advantage of time and we have self-discipline and be responsable.
Rescooped by Jim Lerman from Feed the Writer
Scoop.it!

Story Arc | A Simple Way to Understand and Plot Your Novel

Story Arc | A Simple Way to Understand and Plot Your Novel | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
A story arc is the chain on which the pearls, or scenes, of your novel are strung. The story arc--or narrative arc--is the same thing as "plot."

Via Penelope, Sarah McElrath
more...
Penelope's curator insight, August 2, 2016 7:15 PM
Simply explained, this article is a great keeper to explain story arc. What it is, why it's important, and how to use it to make your novels pop with tension.

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly" ***


Sarah McElrath's curator insight, August 4, 2016 10:21 PM
Helpful way to understand and organize plot.
Rescooped by Jim Lerman from Writing Rightly
Scoop.it!

7 Simple Edits That Make Your Writing 100% More Powerful - Smartblogger.com

7 Simple Edits That Make Your Writing 100% More Powerful - Smartblogger.com | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
Ever wonder why your writing lacks the impact of your writing heroes? Find out the simple secret they don't want you to know.

Via Penelope
more...
Penelope's curator insight, June 15, 2016 9:40 PM
This is an amazing post. Yes, the writing is crisp and concise, but the editing visual at the beginning is a stand-alone lesson. Every writer needs to bookmark this one!

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly" ***

Link to the original article: https://smartblogger.com/editing-tips/



'Timothy Leyfer's curator insight, June 16, 2016 8:06 PM
Here are 7 Simple Tips To Increase The Power Of Your Writing
Rescooped by Jim Lerman from Writing Rightly
Scoop.it!

Spark Creativity with the Plot Generator

Spark Creativity with the Plot Generator | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
Are your students going to write short story, film script or novel in the near future? Then send them to the Plot Generator for some inspiration! This free web tool features generators for various kinds of writing projects in a wide range of genres including fantasy, mystery, romance, teen... http://elearningfeeds.com/spark-creativity-with-the-plot-generator/

Via Christopher Pappas, Luciana Viter, Penelope
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jim Lerman from Writing Rightly
Scoop.it!

The 100 Best Websites for Writers in 2016

The 100 Best Websites for Writers in 2016 | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

"No matter what you want to accomplish in 2016, we’re sure you’ll find quality inspiration and resources.


"We’ve broken this year’s list into seven categories: Blogging, entrepreneurship, creativity and craft, freelancing, marketing, publishing, and writing communities. All sites are listed in alphabetical order within their categories, and the numbers are for easy tracking (not ranking)."


Via Ruth Long , Shannon Bolithoe , Penelope
more...
A. G. Moye's curator insight, January 26, 2016 3:06 PM

Anything to help get your career rolling in writing. 

Penelope's curator insight, January 27, 2016 1:56 PM

 

Great resource for writers--beginners and pros alike!

 

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article: http://thewritelife.com/100-best-websites-writers-2016/

Rescooped by Jim Lerman from 21st Century skills of critical and creative thinking
Scoop.it!

How to Use Foreshadowing - Helping Writers Become Authors - Writing Rightly

How to Use Foreshadowing - Helping Writers Become Authors - Writing Rightly | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
If we sift foreshadowing down to its simplest form, we could say it prepares readers for what will happen later in the story.

Via Penelope, Lynnette Van Dyke
more...
Penelope's curator insight, January 14, 2014 12:35 AM

 

We hear lots about point of view, plot and climax, but what about foreshadowing? This very important element of a story seems to have been relegated to a back room and stuffed in the closet.

 

In its simplest form? It prepares readers for what will happen in the story. I'm sure you've read books where at the point of a major plot twist, you shake your head and say, huh? We all have. You feel cheated and want to snap that book shut!

 

There are two parts:

 

Part 1: The Plant    (Blantant or Subtle Hints)

Part 2: The Payoff (Important Scenes Play Out)

 

Foreshadowing can ease readers into what is going to happen. Sneak it in like pureed veggies, but don't hit readers over the head with it. This way, when you execute your plot twist, your readers will be delighted--not disgusted.

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article: http://www.helpingwritersbecomeauthors.com/2013/04/how-to-use-foreshadowing.html

Rescooped by Jim Lerman from Writing Rightly
Scoop.it!

Elementary Writing Prompts - Writing Rightly

Elementary Writing Prompts - Writing Rightly | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
These elementary writing prompts are great for getting the students writing, in a non-pressurized, fun way.


Penelope Silver's insight


"Sometimes we all need a little push to get going on a writing spree. Students are just beginning their writing journey, so this article could be a big help for teachers. It gives 52 Elementary Writing Prompts--one for every week of the year--to get their little fingers flying.

 

"I shared it because there are also some great story prompts here for adults. I believe these could be used to jog our memories about certain events in our lives. It just may lead to a short story, and then possibly a book!

 

"Have fun with them, let your imagination run wild, and see where it takes you!"

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article:http://www.journalinghelps.com/Elementary-Writing-Prompts.html


Via Penelope
more...
Penelope's curator insight, August 27, 2013 11:35 PM

 

Sometimes we all need a little push to get going on a writing spree. Students are just beginning their writing journey, so this article could be a big help for teachers. It gives 52 Elementary Writing Prompts--one for every week of the year--to get their little fingers flying.

 

I shared it because there are also some great story prompts here for adults. I believe these could be used to jog our memories about certain events in our lives. It just may lead to a short story, and then possibly a book!

 

Have fun with them, let your imagination run wild, and see where it takes you!

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article: http://www.journalinghelps.com/Elementary-Writing-Prompts.html

Rescooped by Jim Lerman from Writing Rightly
Scoop.it!

Write great dialogue scenes in 7 steps - Writing Rightly

Write great dialogue scenes in 7 steps - Writing Rightly | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

"Of all the scenes we write, dialogue is the most complex and rich. Most writers I know take several passes to get it right."


Penelope Silver's insight:


"Dialogue is one of those tricky areas that trip up many authors--myself included. As I am writing my first romance novel, I run into areas such as:

 

"How much dialogue is enough?

When and where should you insert dialogue?

When should you move from narrator consciousness to talking?

How long should you make the responses?

 

"Author Roz Morris gives us seven simple steps to writing great dialogue. You would think most would seem obvious, but some of them are real ah ha! moments. I really appreciate these tips:

 

"VISUALS - People move as they talk. They shrug, make faces, cook, clean, etc. Create a picture in your reader's mind. This will create a richer, more dramatic scene.

 

"REACTIONS - Are the characters reacting and talking or does their internal dialogue evaporate when they start being vocal?

 

"DECLUTTER - Think of your reader when you write dialogue. Readers scan through these scenes quickly, and don't need to be told of every breath and blink. Let your scene sit for a few days, and go back at it with fresh eyes to take out the fat.

 

"Head on over to the article to read four more great tips!"

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article:http://nailyournovel.wordpress.com/2013/04/28/write-great-dialogue-scenes-in-7-steps



Via Penelope
more...
Penelope's curator insight, August 12, 2013 2:17 PM

 

Dialogue is one of those tricky areas that trip up many authors--myself included. As I am writing my first romance novel, I run into areas such as:

 

How much dialogue is enough?

When and where should you insert dialogue?

When should you move from narrator consciousness to talking?

How long should you make the responses?

 

Author Roz Morris gives us seven simple steps to writing great dialogue. You would think most would seem obvious, but some of them are real ah ha! moments. I really appreciate these tips:

 

VISUALS - People move as they talk. They shrug, make faces, cook, clean, etc. Create a picture in your reader's mind. This will create a richer, more dramatic scene.

 

REACTIONS - Are the characters reacting and talking or does their internal dialogue evaporate when they start being vocal?

 

DECLUTTER - Think of your reader when you write dialogue. Readers scan through these scenes quickly, and don't need to be told of every breath and blink. Let your scene sit for a few days, and go back at it with fresh eyes to take out the fat.

 

Header on over to the article to read four more great tips!

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article: http://nailyournovel.wordpress.com/2013/04/28/write-great-dialogue-scenes-in-7-steps

 

Editing in Paradise's curator insight, August 12, 2013 5:30 PM

What on earth are they saying? With this excellent advice, you can bet it it's worth listening to.

Rescooped by Jim Lerman from Writing Rightly
Scoop.it!

Resources for Writers: Tips for Writing Effective Dialogue

Resources for Writers: Tips for Writing Effective Dialogue | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

Via Penelope
more...
Penelope's curator insight, May 21, 2013 12:15 AM

 

Yackety Yak. Blah Blah Blah. We talk every day and in every way. Is it always effective talking? Not really. But when it comes to our writing of dialogue inside of our stories, it better be.

 

When a writer goes on for a page or two or three describing what kind of coffee a character is going to order at the cafe, my eyes start to roll back in my head, and I am more than likely to slam the door on that story.

 

Dialogue is war! If you write dialogue--make it tight--and make it right! Make sure it is going to advance your story. I am still basking in the "afterglow" of all of the wonderful dialogue and storytelling from the remake of the "Great Gatsby" movie. Ah, but that is a post for another day.

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article: http://jodierennerediting.blogspot.com/2010/08/tips-for-writing-effective-dialogue.html

 

 

Jacques Goyette's curator insight, May 21, 2013 3:13 PM

very instructive advice. De bons conseils pour écrire des dialogues réalistes.

Penelope's comment, May 21, 2013 3:17 PM
Merci'!
Rescooped by Jim Lerman from SOCIAL MEDIA, what we think about!
Scoop.it!

Top 10 Blogs for Authors

Top 10 Blogs for Authors | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
Serious writers, who have experienced some level of success, when probed, will reveal that they have done their homework.

 

They continuously read various magazines and blogs for authors, not just to help them improve their writing, but to ensure that they stay on top of the latest developments and opportunities.

 

Many of the opportunities that I’ve snagged were discovered only as a result of reading and interacting with others on various blogs. These are opportunities I never would’ve found, otherwise...


Via Martin Gysler
more...
Rescooped by Jim Lerman from Writing Rightly
Scoop.it!

The Shapes of Stories, a Kurt Vonnegut Infographic

The Shapes of Stories, a Kurt Vonnegut Infographic | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

Maya Eilam is a freelance New York City graphic designer making digital and printed works that bring creativity to communication. Including websites, logos, social media graphics, custom lettering, illustration, photography, infographics, and more.


Via Penelope
more...
Penelope's curator insight, April 21, 10:19 AM
Visuals are wonderful learning tools, and this beautiful infographic is a keeper. Created by an artist to depict "The Shapes of Stories" by Kurt Vonnegut, the pictures are worth a thousand words.

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"*** 
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, May 20, 12:38 PM
This would be an interesting way to teach writing in school. There are certain basic literary archetypes that teachers could focus on. this is not an exhaustive list, but is a great place to begin
Rescooped by Jim Lerman from Writing Rightly
Scoop.it!

8 Awesome Microsoft Word Hacks (Infographic): Entrepreneur.com

8 Awesome Microsoft Word Hacks (Infographic): Entrepreneur.com | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
There's more to Microsoft Word than changing fonts and adding columns.

Via Penelope
more...
Penelope's curator insight, October 31, 2016 2:42 PM
I love these tips shared for writers (or anyone) using Microsoft Word. These are great timesavers!

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

Rescooped by Jim Lerman from Writing Rightly
Scoop.it!

Writing Prompts - CarrieElle.com

Writing Prompts - CarrieElle.com | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
Here are 25 writing prompts to jumpstart your writing muscles.

Via Penelope
more...
Penelope's curator insight, August 29, 2016 9:38 PM
Blank mind? Blank page? Pull out one of these writing prompts. At least one should inspire flying fingers or jotting pens.

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly" ***

Link to the original article: http://www.carrieelle.com/writing-prompts
Rescooped by Jim Lerman from Writing Rightly
Scoop.it!

6 Things Alfred Hitchcock Can Teach You About Writing

6 Things Alfred Hitchcock Can Teach You About Writing | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
“ Alfred Hitchcock was an English film director and producer who worked closely with screenwriters on his films. The master storyteller, born 13 August 1899, died 29 April 1980.”

Via elearning hoje, Shannon Bolithoe , Penelope
more...
Penelope's curator insight, August 16, 2016 12:44 PM
Alfred Hitchcock had the scream theme down pat. These tips, however, could apply to any writing genre to give it a new heartbeat. Great ideas!

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly" ***

Rescooped by Jim Lerman from Feed the Writer
Scoop.it!

Story Arc | A Simple Way to Understand and Plot Your Novel

Story Arc | A Simple Way to Understand and Plot Your Novel | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
A story arc is the chain on which the pearls, or scenes, of your novel are strung. The story arc--or narrative arc--is the same thing as "plot."

Via Penelope, Sarah McElrath
more...
Penelope's curator insight, August 2, 2016 7:15 PM
Simply explained, this article is a great keeper to explain story arc. What it is, why it's important, and how to use it to make your novels pop with tension.

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly" ***


Sarah McElrath's curator insight, August 4, 2016 10:21 PM
Helpful way to understand and organize plot.
Rescooped by Jim Lerman from Writing Rightly
Scoop.it!

Getting to the Core of Character Motivation

Getting to the Core of Character Motivation | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
Getting to the Core of Character Motivation is a guest post by Becca Puglisi detailing inner and outer motivation of characters in fiction

Via Penelope
more...
Penelope's curator insight, June 7, 2016 9:46 PM
Developing characters in our stories is one of the hardest things to get right. This is an excellent post that explains the character arc, which consists of four pieces. Worthwhile read.

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly" ***

Rescooped by Jim Lerman from Into the Driver's Seat
Scoop.it!

Why Writers Are the Worst Procrastinators - The Atlantic

Why Writers Are the Worst Procrastinators - The Atlantic | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

The psychological origins of waiting (... and waiting, and waiting) to work.


Via Sharon Bakar, Penelope, Jim Lerman
more...
Chris Simon's curator insight, February 4, 2016 4:01 AM

Non, vous n'êtes pas le seul à procrastiner ! ;-)

Sara Rosett's curator insight, February 4, 2016 11:15 AM

Sara's thoughts:  really interesting article on mindset and how it impacts work.

#tw

Dr. Helen Teague's curator insight, February 5, 2016 8:15 AM

"Forced into a challenge we're not prepared for, we often engage 'self-handicapping': deliberately doing things that set us up for failure." By

Megan McArdle

 

Rescooped by Jim Lerman from Writing Rightly
Scoop.it!

Be a Happy Writer: 10 Ideas for Writing Businesses You Can Start Today - Angela Booth's Fab Freelance Writing Blog

Be a Happy Writer: 10 Ideas for Writing Businesses You Can Start Today - Angela Booth's Fab Freelance Writing Blog | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

There’s never in the history of the world been a better time to be a writer. You can write what you like. No one will burn you at the stake for your ideas. The biggest benefit of all: you’ve got the Internet. It’s a virtual world.


Via Penelope
more...
Penelope's curator insight, September 2, 2014 1:59 PM

 

You can be a writer and you can making a living from it, but it may take a little savvy on your part. If you're fresh out of ideas of where you could sell your literary wares, this article could give you a jump start.

 

There are several very creative niches I knew nothing about. Find one, and get started on your writing career!

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article: http://www.fabfreelancewriting.com/blog/2013/10/15/be-a-happy-writer-10-ideas-for-writing-businesses-you-can-start-today/

Rescooped by Jim Lerman from Writing Rightly
Scoop.it!

Scribophile - Writing Rightly

Scribophile - Writing Rightly | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

"He Said, She Said: Dialog Tags and Using Them Effectively."

by D.M. Johnson

-------------------


Penelope Silver's insight:

 

Dialogue can trip up even the most seasoned of writers. You can read about it all day long, but until you're actually writing and needing to use dialogue tags (or speech tags), you'll probably skip over this stuff.

 

Think of these tags as signposts, pointing to who is actually doing the talking. Each tag contains at least one noun or pronoun. (said, asked, whispered, remarked).

 

Susannah said

the clerk asked

she said and took off her coat

he said, looking sad

 

As I am writing my current novel, I sail merrily along, adding in some dialogue tags with ease, and getting myself mired in the mud at others.

 

Do I use he said or she said? Where does that comma go? Should I use a more expressive tag?

 

One thing to keep in mind: the "he/she said," or "he/she asked" will disappear in the reader's mind, while adding in an expressive tag will make it stick out like a sore thumb.

 

Read on if you, too, need a college lesson in drumming up the proper speech tag.

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article:http://www.scribophile.com/academy/he-said-she-said-dialog-tags-and-using-them-effectively


Via Penelope
more...
Penelope's curator insight, October 30, 2013 6:01 PM

 

Dialogue can trip up even the most seasoned of writers. You can read about it all day long, but until you're actually writing and needing to use dialogue tags (or speech tags), you'll probably skip over this stuff.

 

Think of these tags as signposts, pointing to who is actually doing the talking. Each tag contains at least one noun or pronoun. (said, asked, whispered, remarked).

 

Susannah said

the clerk asked

she said and took off her coat

he said, looking sad

 

As I am writing my current novel, I sail merrily along, adding in some dialogue tags with ease, and getting myself mired in the mud at others.

 

Do I use he said or she said? Where does that comma go? Should I use a more expressive tag?

 

One thing to keep in mind: the "he/she said," or "he/she asked" will disappear in the reader's mind, while adding in an expressive tag will make it stick out like a sore thumb.

 

Read on if you, too, need a college lesson in drumming up the proper speech tag.

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article: http://www.scribophile.com/academy/he-said-she-said-dialog-tags-and-using-them-effectively

 

Jacques Goyette's curator insight, October 31, 2013 4:44 PM

Tis is how dialog tags should be used.

Rescooped by Jim Lerman from Writing Rightly
Scoop.it!

10 Tips For Writing Endings To Your Story - Writing Rightly

10 Tips For Writing Endings To Your Story - Writing Rightly | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

"Always keep in mind what is expected in the genre you’re writing. If you’re writing a category romance, then the hero and heroine must unite at the end."


Penelope Silver's insight


"Writing endings for our stories could be the easiest thing in the world or the hardest. The best way to begin is to ponder on what kind of ending is expected for the genre in which you are writing. If you are writing a category romance, readers are going to expect the love interests to finally get together and have a happy ending. There have been exceptions (Romeo and Juliet or Love Story). If you are a reader anticipating a romantic story and happy ending, do you want to read a tragic ending? I don't.

 

"The 10 tips presented should give you a great beginning to write your own ending. Check out the article for all the details.

 

1. Always keep in mind what is EXPECTED in the genre.

2. Avoid the dreaded DEUX EX MACHINE (gods taking care of it).

3. Think APPROPRIATE ending rather than satisfying ending. 
4. NO MISERABLE ENDINGS for characters to no real purpose
5. Struggling? Compose an EVENT. Bring most characters together
6. REALLY struggling—go back to the BEGINNING.
7. When the story is over—STOP.
8. BEWARE of TOO MUCH BUILD UP with too quick a resolution.
9. No need to tie up every little plot string, but TIE UP MOST of them
10. EPILOGS: I kind of like them (peek into the future)"

 

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article:http://debravega.wordpress.com/2013/08/18/10-tips-for-writing-endings-to-your-story/


Via Inspire the Muse, Penelope
more...
Penelope's curator insight, August 23, 2013 4:07 PM

 

Writing endings for our stories could be the easiest thing in the world or the hardest. The best way to begin is to ponder on what kind of ending is expected for the genre in which you are writing. If you are writing a category romance, readers are going to expect the love interests to finally get together and have a happy ending. There have been exceptions (Romeo and Juliet or Love Story). If you are a reader anticipating a romantic story and happy ending, do you want to read a tragic ending? I don't.

 

The 10 tips presented should give you a great beginning to write your own ending. Check out the article for all the details.

 

1. Always keep in mind what is EXPECTED in the genre.

2. Avoid the dreaded DEUX EX MACHINE (gods taking care of it).

3. Think APPROPRIATE ending rather than satisfying ending.
4. NO MISERABLE ENDINGS for characters to no real purpose
5. Struggling? Compose an EVENT. Bring most characters together
6. REALLY struggling—go back to the BEGINNING.
7. When the story is over—STOP.
8. BEWARE of TOO MUCH BUILD UP with too quick a resolution.
9. No need to tie up every little plot string, but TIE UP MOST of them
10. EPILOGS: I kind of like them (peek into the future)

 

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article: http://debravega.wordpress.com/2013/08/18/10-tips-for-writing-endings-to-your-story/

 

 

 

Kimberley Vico's curator insight, August 24, 2013 12:40 AM

Like a strong beginning, you ought to have a good ending ~ in any story!  Give it a try...!

Rescooped by Jim Lerman from Writing Rightly
Scoop.it!

Using Dragon Naturally Speaking to Increase Productivity | Writing Tools

Using Dragon Naturally Speaking to Increase Productivity | Writing Tools | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it

"Authors are pressed for time. What if we could "dictate" our novels instead of typing them?"


Via Penelope
more...
Penelope's curator insight, July 3, 2013 11:31 AM

 

This post is very timely, as I have been considering making the switch from Word to Scrivener, and from typing to dictating.

 

This author is finding her voice with the software, "Dragon Naturally Speaking", and she gives us some very compelling reasons to try it out. Number 1? INCREASED PRODUCTIVITY.

 

She started out small with dictating e-mails and blog posts, and then gave it a shot for dictating the first draft of a novel. Her article gives us a peek into her process. Fascinating.

 

You can find this software on Amazon, and can get started with the home version to try it out.

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article: http://writing4success.com/blog/using-dragon-naturally-speaking-to-increase-productivity/

Rescooped by Jim Lerman from Writing Rightly
Scoop.it!

27 Pieces Of Advice For Writers From Famous Authors

27 Pieces Of Advice For Writers From Famous Authors | Scriveners' Trappings | Scoop.it
Celebrated authors, editors and illustrators write advice to young writers on their hands for " Shared Worlds ," a two-week creative writing summer camp at Wofford College.

Via Penelope
more...
Jacques Goyette's curator insight, April 25, 2013 7:41 PM

Very good advice from bestselling authors.

Jacques Goyette's comment, April 26, 2013 7:56 PM
A lot of people seem to appreciate this article. Keep up the good work Penelope.
Penelope's comment, April 26, 2013 9:48 PM
Thanks, Jacques! These articles are fun to seek out and read! :)