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How to Download and PDF a Twitter Stream

How to Download and PDF a Twitter Stream | Write On! | Scoop.it
I was recently working on a case where I needed to download and PDF a Twitter stream to preserve the information in case the information was deleted or changed at a later date. The simple solution was to create a […]
Judith van Praag's insight:

Been tweeting like mad during a conference or symposium and want to capture your tweets for future reference? Follow the instructions in Brian Willingham's comprehensive post.

You do need a full Adobe license, if you don't have that, ask a friend who does to save your Twitter stream for you. 

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Rare recording of Virginia Woolf - BBC News

Rare recording of Virginia Woolf - BBC News | Write On! | Scoop.it
Listen to an extract from the only surviving recording of the voice of Virginia Woolf from April 1937
Judith van Praag's insight:

Listen to Virginia Woolf's deliverance. I never thought of her as a spoken word artist, but here you go. She's a performance artist making a statement. She's a literary groundbreaker, a spear header, or if you will bully, telling us what we can or can't do.

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Grants for Individuals | NEA

Grants for Individuals | NEA | Write On! | Scoop.it
Judith van Praag's insight:

If you have particular writing plans for 2017 this is the time to apply for a special grant from the National Endowment for the Arts. Unfortunately the deadline for translation projects has passed, but keep that opportunity in mind for future projects. 
 

Fellowships in fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction enable recipients to set aside time for writing, research, travel, and general career advancement. Non-matching grants are for $25,000.

Application Deadline: March 9, 2016
Notification: December 2016
Earliest Start Date: January 1, 2017

 

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Little Things That Editors Love | The Review Review

Little Things That Editors Love | The Review Review | Write On! | Scoop.it
Judith van Praag's insight:

Hooray! According to tip #5 you've got one up on all other writers, your submission to the literary magazine will come from an exotic-sounding place. Coming from a strange place promises to make your work stand out from the get-go.

 

Just imagine that junior editor or a screener/reader like Amy Miller facing the umpteenth manuscript on the slush pile. And there it is, your envelope adorned with stamps from across the world. Your work is bound to receive more attention.

 

According to Ms. Miller there's a great opportunity for writing groups as well. Go on an outing with your posse and mail your stories en masse from the post office at the general store in the middle of nowhere.

 

The stamp collecting reader will pay more attention to your writing if you come from a strange place.

 

Let's remember though, coming from a strange place can have a double innuendo, and for writers, that is what really counts.

 

 

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Technology for Writers Newsletter

Technology for Writers Newsletter | Write On! | Scoop.it
Technology for Writers Newsletter, by Ned Hayes : Context, Research, and Bookish Tech for all your Writerly Needs
Judith van Praag's insight:

Writers are often told to create an Internet platform; writing a book isn't enough, they've got to verbalize nouns; it's not enough to have a web log, they've got to blog, tweet on Twitter, pin (on Pinterest) and Facebook (that's where the verb is lost all together). The younger ones don't do the latter, they post on Tumblr, Instagram and Google+.
 

This said, promoting their books is the last thing writers should do on Social Media platforms, they have to gain followers by sharing their knowledge about a secondary passion.
Get that?

 

Yes, blog, tweet, Facebook, Instagram, Pin, Tumblr, and GeePlus about something other than the book they slaved on for x-number of years. 

Get out!

 

Well, it's not that bad, every writer has an interest that justifies lingering. Be that a hobby or good cause, a day job or fascination. 

 

Take Ned Hayes, this writer of historical fiction knows about technology, and he's making good use of that, sharing his knowledge and that of those he follows in his Daily. 

Git already! Check it out!

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Can You Include Song Lyrics in Your Book?

Can You Include Song Lyrics in Your Book? | Write On! | Scoop.it
Judith van Praag's insight:

The title of the linked post says: Can you? Well, of course you can, whether you may (for free) is another question. 

Do you really need to use the actual lyrics? Mentioning the song title might be enough if your readership is familiar with the tunes, but if your focus market grew up in another era chances are the title won't evoke mood. For that reason alone you may want to quote lyrics, and if you're thinking about that, read up on copyright law. Music and lyrics produced after 1923 are not in the public domain! Get busy before it's too late, meaning long before your book goes to print, even before your manuscript is sold.

Git already!

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Ekphrastic Challenge | Rattle: Poetry for the 21st Century

Ekphrastic Challenge | Rattle: Poetry for the 21st Century | Write On! | Scoop.it
Judith van Praag's insight:

Look from the corner of your eye,

take note of your senses, emotions,

associations with past encounters;

take note of what is

shown and what you see, discover

the eye of the artist and your own.

Are they one and the same,

how come? Where do you meet

the other, can you pin point

that moment in time?

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Carol Johnson's curator insight, December 19, 2015 1:59 PM

For my friends who know a poem when they see it.

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Healing Through Writing

Healing Through Writing | Write On! | Scoop.it
Imagine you are a woman with 8- and 10-year-old sons who is losing her husband to alcohol. He has refused all help and the financial betrayals must come to an end. You finally worked up the nerve t…
Judith van Praag's insight:

Kathryn Craft explored the answers to the usual W’s of her husband’s motivation to end his life the way he did by creating another character living another kind of story, but with possibly similar challenges and disappointments.
No time is ever wasted when we practice our craft. So, waiting for her understanding, waiting for her emotions to be less raw when addressing the re-visioning of what happened to create more than just a report, waiting for the story to mature was time well used. 

And then, after publishing this in-between-novel, she created the story she wanted to tell from the get go.

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Crevasse vs. crevice - Grammarist

Crevasse vs. crevice - Grammarist | Write On! | Scoop.it
Judith van Praag's insight:

While watching a special on Denali, the highest mountain in North America I hear the mountaineers talk about crevasse. Is that a new way to say crevice I wondered.

In a way yes, and in a way no. 

Way back both originated from the Old French "cravace", the English started using crevice in the 14th century, whereas crevasse didn't come into English use until the 19th century thanks to Alpine mountaineers' lingo. 

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Fiction University: Revealing a Character's Past Without Falling Into Backstory

Fiction University: Revealing a Character's Past Without Falling Into Backstory | Write On! | Scoop.it
Judith van Praag's insight:

Good addition for the writers' craft library.

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‘John le Carré: The Biography,’ and Frederick Forsyth’s ‘The Outsider’

‘John le Carré: The Biography,’ and Frederick Forsyth’s ‘The Outsider’ | Write On! | Scoop.it
A biography of John le Carré and a memoir by Frederick Forsyth explore their shared history in intelligence.
Judith van Praag's insight:

Each time I happen upon le Carré's name and writing, my memory takes me back to a bench on Schiermonnikoog, one the Netherlands' northern isles where I sat hours at end, reading one of the author's tomes. 

But the book that received the most notes in the side bar was The Perfect Spy, which in the linked article is called his most autobiographical work. In effect it was my then psychiatrist who suggested the book since I might relate to the author's relationship with his father. My father's escapades don't even come close to those of Ronnie Cornwell, but there's something, yes, there was a lot that I related to. Would have to look up the notes, but yes, there was. 

 

Now, I'm looking forward to Adam Sisman's biography, "John le Carré: The Biography" to shed more light, especially on the work process of one of my favorite authors. Hooray! One thing I'd like to know is how he got to choose his pen name. Or was that disclosed already?

 

And perhaps I'll take a look at Frederick Forsyth's autobiography The Outsider as well, as Joseph Kanon said good for a very pleasant evening.  

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Stephen King, Not Just the Guy Who Makes Monsters

Stephen King, Not Just the Guy Who Makes Monsters | Write On! | Scoop.it
As a college student, I had so much in my head that I had migraine headaches.
Judith van Praag's insight:

Oh, man, just the idea there's a follow up on Stephen King's "On Writing" A Memoir of the Craft" excites me. Not a fan of horror I appreciate this master's handle on craft more than anything, and his storytelling is superb, not limited to zombi type horror, but covering real (albeit fictional) people's nightmares as well. After all Mr, King is the author of "The Shawshank Redemption", did you know that? 

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The Scenic Detour to Being a Novelist

The Scenic Detour to Being a Novelist | Write On! | Scoop.it
I wanted to be a writer. Always. Yet when I was graduating from college, I remember sitting on the steep back stairs to the yard of my family’s house in Johnstown, Pa, and thinking “I can’t do it. …
Judith van Praag's insight:

Apart from the academic track, and details in the road blocks, Kathleen George's story could've been mine.
 

I remember clearly running into acquaintances on the Nieuwmarkt in Amsterdam. I told them I was studying theater design at the Rietveld Academy. So you want to be a painter? the man asked.
No, I want to be a writer, I said.

Why go to art school, wouldn't it make more sense to study Dutch literature, the man asked.

Why not go to art school? The woman said, studying theater arts may lead to writing. 
What I didn't tell them was that my counselor had suggested Art Therapy, to help me open up, but since there was nothing like that available at the time, at least not accessible to me, she suggested I might learn to share visually what I could not share in words.  

 

A few years later I told a faculty member that I was writing.

Writing? You? What on earth could you have to tell? I see you more as a Peggy Guggenheim, he said. 

Writing, my friend the dentist said. Why add to what's already there?

 

So I plugged on, working as designer, visualizing the stories of others, mostly minority groups in the Netherlands, until I decided in 1989 that it was time to pay attention to that one minority I had neglected, my own family, the story that I had promised my father to never forget, and to tell.

 

Eventually I went from journaling and taking notes for stage directors, to publishing a memoir about infant loss, grief and recovery to working as Arts reporter for the International Examiner in Seattle. After years of practicing, I'm finishing my manuscripts, books I've been working on for ever. 

 

And as Kathleen George states, time wasn't wasted, the detour called life is part of the experience, and while often the road is more important than the destination, I'm looking forward to presenting my books to the world —not to mention the adversaries who, in the end, were more crucial in making me finish what I started than they could've imagined. 

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Short Story Dispensers in Public Areas Grenoble Trigger Thoughts

Short Story Dispensers in Public Areas Grenoble Trigger Thoughts | Write On! | Scoop.it
To make the time pass and to allow its residents to enjoy a little culture, Grenoble has introduced short story dispensers in public areas around the town.

Via Dr. Madelyn Blair
Judith van Praag's insight:
Picking up a story while waiting, or on your way to the next destination. Seeing the headline my first association was with the Story Chairs an audiovisual project conceived and executed by Seattle artist/writer Tina Hogatt. Yours truly contributed a story to the series that visitors to Jack Straw Productions Gallery could enjoy seated in an especially constructed easy listening chair. My response to the story dispenser is two-fold. On one hand I applaud the idea that a larger audience is exposed to the work of short story writers, on the other hand I think stories are unfolding all around us, and allowing people to look around, and see what's going on in their environment, giving them room to spin their own tales ought to have room, or space to develop. My thought: provide a short short, or flash fiction piece, AND encourage the reader to look around and create their own narrative.
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Dr. Madelyn Blair's curator insight, October 16, 2015 1:11 PM

Innovation occurs in the most unexpected ways. Just imagine waiting in the cafeteria line and have a story you can read in 3 minutes in your hand. Grenoble, France is experimenting with ways to fill the gaps in people lives as they wait in lines. But imagine what you might do in your company with something that conveys a new initiative in a little story or explains a value of the company through a little story. I think there are lots of possibilities here. What do you think? This review was written by Madelyn Blair, PhD. Visit her at madelynblair.com or follow her @madelynblair.

Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)'s curator insight, October 16, 2015 4:16 PM

Love this idea.  I would like to hear more about this idea.  Who writes the stories and if you can pick a genre.  I could see these types of dispensers being used to tell local stories and history.

Cathryn Wellner's curator insight, October 18, 2015 4:00 PM

I love this idea - what a way to transform the irritation of waits in queues, not to mention all the other possibilities for this approach to story sharing.

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How (and why) to proof your book

How (and why) to proof your book | Write On! | Scoop.it
Look, I’ve done it too. And I work here. You know what I’m talking about: Submitting a book to print and realizing there’s a spelling error, grammar problem, wonky layout, inconsistent wording. It’s human nature. We’re really bad at noticing errors because our brains know what we wanted to say. The number one reason people ask to cancel an order after they’ve made it is... Read More
Judith van Praag's insight:

Whether you're self publishing and using Blurb, or sending your manuscript to an agent or even your editor, spelling and grammar should be impeccable. Wonderful word, "impeccable." 
My personal translation is that one can't pick (peg, or peck) any mistakes. 
Printing the text and looking at the material off screen is important, anything that makes you look at sentences and words in another way than the usual can be helpful. 

Reading your manuscript from the back to the front, picking through the page from the bottom right hand corner to the top left hand will make typos and wrong chosen words jump out at you. 

No need to start with the last word, just moving backward one sentence at a time is a great way to proof read.

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Gates Notes: Best Books of 2015

Bill Gates shares his list of best books he read in 2015: “Eradication” by Nancy Leys Stepan, “Thing Explainer” by Randall Munroe, “Sustainable Materials Wit...
Judith van Praag's insight:

If you wonder how you can get Bill Gates to review your book, knowing what he likes to read is a good beginning. 

Gates himself offers some insight on his blog Gates Notes:

"I just looked over the list of books I read this year, and I noticed a pattern. A lot of them touch on a theme that I would call “how things work.”
Some explain something about the physical world, like how steel and glass are used, or what it takes to get rid of deadly diseases. Others offer deep insights into human beings: our strengths and flaws, our capacity for lifelong growth, or the things we value. I didn’t set out to explore these themes intentionally, though in retrospect it make a lot of sense since the main reason I read is to learn."


You got that? Bill Gates reads to learn. 
I get that.
 

In 2003 I talked to a literary agent who asked me what I liked to read. At the time all that came to mind were names of aging male Jewish American authors. That may have had something to do with my writing about my father, who was old when I was born and aging rapidly after. Looking for my father, trying to find out who he was, I turned to voices I recognized as similar to his, and those were not necessarily Dutch, but most definitely opinionated, pained, searching.
So you're writing literary fiction, the agent deducted.
If that is so, my books may not wind up on Bill Gates' desk.

 

Really? Some things are learned by reading novels. And, in the article by Katherine Rossman in The Seattle Times that took me to look for Gates' blog in the first place I read about "The Rosie Project" by Graeme Simsion. The M.C. in this novel (!) is a genetics professor with Asperger's syndrome who goes looking for a wife. 


So there you go, a former diamant worker gone Art & Antiques dealer, WWI and WWII Vet with PTSD, trying his hand at Art to get a woman to marry him and give him a child  may be just up Gates' alley. 

 

One never knows how a cow catches a hare (that's no insult, that's straight from the Dutch). 

  

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2016 Cause Awareness & Giving Day Calendar

2016 Cause Awareness & Giving Day Calendar | Write On! | Scoop.it
Cause awareness and giving days can be very powerful for online fundraising. The real-time, in the moment nature of social media increases the likelihood that donors will be inspired to give to you…
Judith van Praag's insight:

Even if you're not the content provider of a nonprofit, you —writer— can use the listings as prompts. And by writing a story that's been lying dormant, you may even discover you have a passion for a specific cause. The personal becomes political if you have a stake in the matter.

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Spend Less Time Online, Repurpose Your Content, 13 Ways to Increase Visibility

Spend Less Time Online, Repurpose Your Content, 13 Ways to Increase Visibility | Write On! | Scoop.it
Repurposing your content increases your return on time investment, creating more uses for what you've created. Includes checklist.
Judith van Praag's insight:

People who are new to Social Media and platform building often say I must spend a lot of time Online. Well, I do, and I don't, it's all a matter of setting up your platform and making your words count, not just by creating sharp SEO content, but by writing once and publishing many times over, sending a buck shot across the web. 

How?

 

Since Denise Wakeman did a fine job explaining that, I'm going to send you over to her site. Check it out. I've got some reading and writing to do ;-)

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How to legally quote song lyrics in your book | BookBaby Blog

How to legally quote song lyrics in your book | BookBaby Blog | Write On! | Scoop.it
Authors have been quoting lyrics in their books for a very long time — and it makes sense; referencing a piece of music can "set the mood, evoke...
Judith van Praag's insight:

Are you using lyrics created after 1923 in your book? Start early getting permission to do so, that is, before your book goes to print, preferably before your book was sold, or even before you present the manuscript to an agent or publisher.
The clock is ticking. Go!

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Rattle: Poetry for the 21st Century - Chapbook Contest - Deadline 1/15/16

Rattle: Poetry for the 21st Century - Chapbook Contest - Deadline 1/15/16 | Write On! | Scoop.it
In a world where a bestselling full-length poetry book means 1,000 copies sold, the winner will reach an audience five times as large on the first day alone—an audience that includes hundreds of other literary magazines, presses, and well-known poets. This will be a chapbook to launch a career.
Judith van Praag's insight:

A writing American in Paris triggered the making of my first chapbook in the attic of a five hundred year old house in Quartier Latin,  just a few blocks from the legendary book store Shakespeare & Co. After George Whitman himself accepted and shelved that stapled booklet, he offered me a place to stay. While not yet allergic to cats, I was highly sensitive to feline fleas, so I politely declined, but I did accept his invitation to read from my chapbook Paris/France at the store.

 

These days, when most everything we do lives in a virtual world, Online, it could be great fun to play with real scissors and glue, cut text, to use rathe than to discard, photo copy images and create something tangible, a booklet, a limited edition chap book. 

 

To participate in the contest however, you should read and follow the guidelines. Who knows, maybe you will be the one to see 5000 copies of your short short book in print. 

 

What's keeping you? Have you created poems around a theme, do you have a collection that goes together? A family of strung words that call out to be read by a larger audience?

Git already. Go for it.

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Secondary Characters Who Teach The Protagonist

Secondary Characters Who Teach The Protagonist | Write On! | Scoop.it
Writers frequently think the Mentor Role Function *just* means the literal version of this character, such as Morpheus teaching Neo how the machines work and how to kick ass in THE MATRIX (1999). B...
Judith van Praag's insight:

At first, being Dutch, I read "Bang" as afraid, fearful to write, for that's what the word "bang" means in my native language. Every so often, when a word is spelled like a word with another meaning I get those kind of language mix-ups.

No, I have no fear of writing, I thought. But seeing the 2 for to write I got it. BANG! A bulb lit up over my head.

This post is right on, so Write On! and make those secondary characters work for ya. Leave the exposition where it belongs, in your notebook and make a scene. 

Make a scene!

Having your character interact with another living creature pays off big time. Action, conflict, it's all about interaction that leads to understanding more of the main character about the story that's being told, whether on the page, on the small or large screen.

BANG! Light bulb!

 

PS Want to add some female secondary characters to the equation? Write a blog post and make sure we get to read it. 

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TV Writing Masterclass March 19-20 2016

TV Writing Masterclass March 19-20 2016 | Write On! | Scoop.it
Judith van Praag's insight:

Have you been itching to let your favorite characters on your favorite TV-show experience what you've got in store for them? Want to make it happen? Get real and get ready! 

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Quantum Theory Proves That Time Does Not Exist - WokenMind

Quantum Theory Proves That Time Does Not Exist - WokenMind | Write On! | Scoop.it
Quantum Theory Proves That Time Does Not Exist. It shows that our concept of time, as thought of as a linear passage of events is totally wide of the mark
Judith van Praag's insight:

Remember the TV series Quantum Leap? Love movies such as  Back To The Future? Are you playing with time in your writing or film making?

I stumbled on Larry G. Maguire's blog wanting to check my understanding of connectivity across eras in regards to patchwork family blankets and quilts. 

Yes, that's how my mind works.

You start with family members' discarded pajamas, plaid shirts and floral skirts, you cut strips and squares and triangles, or just let crazy quilting fun take over, and before you know it your needles dance across the times, connecting tomorrow and yesteryear all in one day. 

To crafty for you?

Check out WokenMind, Maguire, he'll get you right back where you wanted to go, pondering existential questions, collective consciousness and the universe. 

 

 

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Does Fiction Based on Fact Have a Responsibility to the Truth?

Does Fiction Based on Fact Have a Responsibility to the Truth? | Write On! | Scoop.it
Thomas Mallon and Ayana Mathis discuss whether writers of historical fiction need to keep the facts in mind.
Judith van Praag's insight:

If you deal with real people and their offspring, you better be careful. Prescribing an adulterous affair to a First Lady to make her seem more human (because fallible) than the real person we've come to know through the media doesn't seem right to me. 

 

If writing fiction based on fact, yet not writing historical fiction, why not stick to fictional characters and make up a fictitious country? 

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Carol Johnson's curator insight, December 19, 2015 2:00 PM

Ummm . . . I'm going to say no. That's why it's called fiction.

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In Memory of Ann Rule: 9 Tips for Breaking Into True Crime Writing

In Memory of Ann Rule: 9 Tips for Breaking Into True Crime Writing | Write On! | Scoop.it
Bestseller Ann Rule had a heck of a journey to becoming a writer. Here is her incredible personal saga, and her tips on how to break into true crime.
Judith van Praag's insight:

Obsession, that's what it takes to write true crime, that's what I got from listening to those who succeeded. These 9 points are crucial to keep in mind. Print the list and put it over your desk, or store in Evernote. Don't use Evernote? Get it. 

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Carol Johnson's curator insight, December 19, 2015 2:01 PM

Ann Rule was the queen of true crime. We could all learn a little something from her.

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The Porches | A Room of Your Own - With a View

The Porches | A Room of Your Own - With a View | Write On! | Scoop.it
Year-round writers' retreat in Virginia. Historic home overlooking the James River, quiet, limited number of guests, literary retreat welcomes writers of fiction, non-fiction, filmmakers, playwrights, all genres. Writers in early career as well as those established. Comfortable, elegant private rooms, inspiring, private mentoring, internet access, 3 hours from Washington, D.C.
Judith van Praag's insight:

Whenever I read about writer's residences I remember Erica Jong's story about her experience at a retreat. She didn't last more than a night, if that. Before long after settling in she wanted to be home, in her own writing room, with her own bed, and kitchen. I can't remember the details, trust me, I just tossed those in for fun. Does she cook? I have no idea. But you get my, or her drift, her home is her castle, and she's got a room of her own, a room with a view probably.

For everyone else who needs respite from everyday business, from beloved spouse, children, parents and in-laws, perhaps from a menagerie including cows and goats, a writer's retreat may be it.

 

Someone wants to give you some time to write, to be in an environment where words float through the air, where the grounds are saturated with syllables and syntax skips down the garden path? A place where you don't have to care for anybody but yourself, your writing, your output? Check out writers retreats such as Porches. And put it out there, tell the universe you need a break. A shooting star may drive the message home to that special someone who picks up on your need. 

 

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