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Animations: This Thing Called Science

Animations: This Thing Called Science | wrightmindweb | Scoop.it
We're thrilled to launch our next series of animations: This Thing Called Science. This series follows on from Critical Thinking, showing the way we think scientifically by considering skepticism, ...

Via Beth Dichter
mtmeme's insight:

Great series for introduction to scientific concepts and research methods. When we are aware of sources of bias we can devise ways to test for it or eliminate it. 

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, September 11, 2013 9:31 PM

This is a fabulous series that explore science. Six animated videos are available that show "the way we think scientifically by considering skepticism, testing, blinding, uncertainty  ethics and citizen science." By title they are:

* This Thing Called Science Part 1: Call me skeptical

* This Thing Called Science Part 2: Testing, testing, 1, 2, 3

* This Thing Called Science Part 3: Blinded by Science

* This Thing Called Science Part 4: Confidently Uncertain

* This Thing Called Science Part 5: Do the Right Thing

* This Thing Called Science Part 6: Citizen Science

These videos were created by Bridge8, who also put out a great series of videos on Critical Thinking. You can find that series at http://bridge8.wordpress.com/2012/01/30/critical-thinking-animations/

There are also 2 guides available for the Critical Thinking series, a postcard size one and an extended one. I found these on YouTube when I accessed the video Critical Thinking Part 1: A Valuable Argument uploaded by techNyouvids.

Miro Svetlik's curator insight, September 12, 2013 3:45 AM

These cartoons are really sweet and very well done. Nice way to explain the though process behind the science, make sure to see at least one of them.

Hanis's curator insight, July 22, 3:50 PM

Learn more about Science by first understanding the Scientific Process. These videos above make it much more easier to understand the topic. 

wrightmindweb
The Web in the Life of the Mind
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Virtual Reality System Lets You Explore Your Brain in Real-Time - LiveScience.com

Virtual Reality System Lets You Explore Your Brain in Real-Time - LiveScience.com | wrightmindweb | Scoop.it
LiveScience.com
Virtual Reality System Lets You Explore Your Brain in Real-Time
LiveScience.com
AUSTIN, Texas — Imagine if it were possible to explore your brain in virtual reality, watching your thoughts flashing before your eyes?
mtmeme's insight:

The wave of the future?

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Happy New Year 2014 Urbi et Orbi et Arby’s

Happy New Year 2014 Urbi et Orbi et Arby’s | wrightmindweb | Scoop.it
Blaine
mtmeme's insight:

"For those of us who continue to propel the meat puppets we inhabit along life’s twisted highway, the rock to which we cling has completed another circuit around the nearby fusion inferno which gives us the energy to continue that propulsion. This node, this wavefront, this scintillating particle storm which attests loudly to its individuality at every turn (me) desires that all who so struggle may continue to do so in a manner which grants them and those around them the maximum skillful survival and the pleasurable experiences which result therefrom. May all beings be happy, safe, healthy and peaceful during this and future rides around the sun."

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The brain’s visual data-compression algorithm

The brain’s visual data-compression algorithm | wrightmindweb | Scoop.it
Data compression in the brain: When the primary visual cortex processes sequences of complete images and images with missing elements — here vertical contours — it “subtracts” the images from each other (the brain computes the differences between...

Via Spaceweaver
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luiy's curator insight, December 26, 2013 8:29 PM

Researchers have assumed that visual information in the brain was transmitted almost in its entirety from its entry point, the primary visual cortex (V1).

 

“We intuitively assume that our visual system generates a continuous stream of images, just like a video camera,” said Dr. Dirk Jancke from the Institute for Neural Computation at Ruhr University.

 

“However, we have now demonstrated that the visual cortex suppresses redundant information and saves energy by frequently forwarding image differences,” similar to methods used for video data compression in communication technology. The study was published inCerebral Cortex (open access).

 

Using recordings in cat visual cortex, Jancke and associates recorded the neurons’ responses to natural image sequences such as vegetation, landscapes, and buildings. They created two versions of the images: a complete one, and one in which they had systematically removed vertical or horizontal contours.

 

If these individual images were presented at 33Hz (30 milliseconds per image), the neurons represented complete image information. But at 10Hz (100 milliseconds), the neurons represented only those elements that were new or missing, that is, image differences.

 

To monitor the dynamics of neuronal activities in the brain in the millisecond range, the scientists used voltage-dependent dyes. Those substances fluoresce when neurons receive electrical impulses and become active, measured across a surface of several square millimeters. The result is a temporally and spatially precise record of transmission processes within the neuronal network

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KNSTRCT

KNSTRCT | wrightmindweb | Scoop.it
KNSTRCT is an daily-updated design blog and community. Stay in the know for fashion, architecture, interior design, transportation design, product design, and art.
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Design cubed!

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7 Simple Google Tips To Search Like A Boss

7 Simple Google Tips To Search Like A Boss | wrightmindweb | Scoop.it

"Anyone can type a word or phrase into the Google window and hope for the best.

Some even use quotation marks, or use autocomplete to their advantage. But how about putting a dash before a word to exclude it from your search? Or using the tilde–like a boss–to search for synonyms for a term as well?"


Via Beth Dichter
mtmeme's insight:

easy to do!

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Louis LesCallett's curator insight, October 11, 2013 2:56 PM

This site will help you clear up any problems you have with Google searching!

Mary Cunningham's curator insight, October 13, 2013 12:07 PM

I'm not sure why googling well is a "boss" attribute but the hints are good.  I am trying them now!

Carol Rine's curator insight, October 14, 2013 6:49 PM

Love learning the "insider" tricks!

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Fool for Being Fooled

Fool for Being Fooled | wrightmindweb | Scoop.it
Why do we love being fooled? A look at why people get a thrill out of misdirection in puzzle cluing and sleight-of-hand.
mtmeme's insight:

"Puzzle master Will Shortz feels that “part of the appeal of crosswords is having the brain twisted — for example, seeing a phrase in a different light.” Mr. Shortz, who has been the editor of The New York Times crossword puzzle since 1993, offered several examples of clues that he has written, such as “Cock and bull” which, on the surface, seems to be a phrase that means an untrue statement, but in this case, was the entry MALES. “Strap for cash” is not an admission of being broke, but is instead a strap that goes around ones’ waist, or a MONEY BELT. His favorite clue is “It can turn into a different story” for SPIRAL STAIRCASE. This writer’s own favorite is “It brings out the child in you” for LABOR."

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News Discovery: Track Any Topic Online with Ping.it Keyword Probes

News Discovery: Track Any Topic Online with Ping.it Keyword Probes | wrightmindweb | Scoop.it

Via Robin Good
mtmeme's insight:

cool curation tool!

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Robin Good's curator insight, September 2, 2013 3:33 AM



Ping.it (review), a web app which allows you to monitor and discover relevant news in your areas of interest, has just introduced a new powerful feature with makes it possible to track any relevant content being published around a specific keyword.


Just specify the set of keywords or keyphrase you want to track, and almost instantly Ping.it provides you with a preview of relevant content items. 

Probes can be tailored to your specific needs, by applying specific search parameters and social popularity filters. It is also possible to exclude specific keywords. 



I find Ping.it and its keyword monitoring facility very effective and capable of bringing me only high quality results in my field of interest. I would not hesitate to recommend it to those who need to seriously monitor any topic.



Find out more about this feature: http://ping.it/blog/go-beyond-rss-with-keyword-probes/ 


Free to use.


Try Ping.it: http://ping.it/ 







Howard Rheingold's curator insight, September 4, 2013 1:29 PM

As usual, Robin Good is tracking the cutting edge in info-discovery. In addition to RSS feeds of persistent news searches and other kinds of searches and social media monitoring services like talkwalker.com, Ping.it looks like a potentially useful infotention tool (off to test it...)

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The Real Neuroscience of Creativity

The Real Neuroscience of Creativity | wrightmindweb | Scoop.it
'The latest findings from the real neuroscience of creativity suggest that the right brain/left brain distinction is not the right one when it comes to understanding how creativity is implemented in the brain.

Via Beth Dichter
mtmeme's insight:

A more nuanced version than the usual oversimplification. - lw

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Gary Faust's curator insight, August 30, 2013 8:53 PM

In experience creativity seems to be volitional not physiological, now there is some science to counteract this socially accepted point of view. 

Regis Elo's comment, September 18, 2013 7:01 PM
Sorry again for the delay.thankx for your comments. I add that it seems coherent to agree with both of you Kathy and Louise , inclueing the possibility to care about the individual self-consciousness and empathy as a specific human condition to be eternally unsatisfied WITHOUT SPIRITUALITY?....IT'S BEYOND! i guess
Saberes Sin Fronteras Ong's comment, September 19, 2013 1:18 PM
Thanks for the comments.
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Collective Intelligence 2014

"This interdisciplinary conference seeks to bring together researchers from a variety of fields relevant to understanding and designing collective intelligence of many types."


Via Howard Rheingold
mtmeme's insight:

Hope they have a webcast!

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Vivianne Amaral's curator insight, August 12, 2013 6:42 PM

Vai acontecer  em junho de 2014 e reunir grandes nomes da ciência de redes, como Ducan Watts e pesuisadores sobre aprendizagem em rede.

Leah Lesley Christensen's comment, August 31, 2013 9:15 PM
hmm yet another way to make more human guineau pigs ?
Yannick Michel's curator insight, December 28, 2013 10:44 AM

Avec un peux avance pour pouvoir s'organiser ��

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20,000+ FREE Online Science and Technology Lectures from Top Universities

20,000+ FREE Online Science and Technology Lectures from Top Universities | wrightmindweb | Scoop.it

The following topics are covered:

 

Aerospace, Anthropology, Astrobiology, Astronomy, Astrophysics, Biochemistry, Bioengineering, Biology, Biotechnology, Chemistry, Civil Engineering, Cognitive Science, Computers, Cosmology, Dentistry, Electrical Engineering, Engineering, Environment, Future, General Science, Geoscience, Machine Learning, Material Science, Mathematics, Mechanical Engineering, Medicine, Metallurgy, Mining, Nanotechnology, Oceanography, Philosophy, Physics, Physiology, Robotics, and Sociology.

 

Lectures are in Playlists and are alphabetically sorted with thumbnail pictures. No fee, no registration required - learn at your own pace. Certificates can be arranged with presenting universities.

 

NOTE: To subscribe to the RSS feed of Amazing Science, copy http://www.scoop.it/t/amazing-science/rss.xml into the URL field of your browser and click "subscribe".

 

This newsletter is aggregated from over 1450 news sources:

http://www.genautica.com/links/1450_news_sources.html


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
mtmeme's insight:

Great resource! Other similar ones:

http://freevideolectures.com/free-college-courses-online/

http://www.xmarks.com/site/www.freevideolectures.com/

http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/audio-video-courses/

http://www.genautica.com/links/1450_news_sources.html

 

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Casper Pieters's curator insight, March 9, 7:21 PM

Great resources for online learning just about everything.  All you need is will power and self- discipline.

Russ Roberts's curator insight, April 23, 11:37 PM

A very interesting site.  Amazing Science covers many disciplines.  Subscribe to the news letter and be " amazed." Aloha, Russ, KH6JRM. 

Siegfried Holle's curator insight, July 4, 8:45 AM

Your knowledge is your strength and power 

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Two Video Guides to Website Evaluation

Two Video Guides to Website Evaluation | wrightmindweb | Scoop.it

Via Beth Dichter
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Lourense Das's curator insight, July 28, 2013 7:13 AM

Two interesting videos on website evaluation from www.freetech4teachers.com

Dean Mantz's curator insight, July 29, 2013 12:33 AM

I would like to add to Beth Dicther's share, via Richard Byrne's Free Technology 4 Teachers, that website evaluation skills should be a necessity for any student and educator regardless of online or face-to-face. 

josé krijnsen's curator insight, December 4, 2013 1:57 PM

website evaluation

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The Semantic Web is Hugely Important to Tomorrow's Business - Here's Why

The Semantic Web is Hugely Important to Tomorrow's Business - Here's Why | wrightmindweb | Scoop.it
The "semantic Web" is hugely important to tomorrow's business. Do not underestimate its significance: It truly changes everything. Embrace it, or risk extinction. But what is it? And what does it mean for your business?

Via janlgordon
mtmeme's insight:

The tsunami has arrived!

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Bart van Maanen's curator insight, August 3, 2013 8:48 AM

Zoekmachines - en Google - voorop gaan de context van zoektermen steeds beter begrijpen, zodat gebruikers betere en op hun situatie (plek, voorkeuren) toegespitste resultaten krijgen. Omdat het daarbij om de zogeheten 'big data' draait, is onder meer het gebruik van Google+ belangrijk voor Google. 

 

Kort gezegd gaat het betekenen dat zoekwoord 'pizza' niet leidt naar allerhande recepten websites, maar naar de Italiaan om de hoek.

janlgordon's comment, August 8, 2013 3:50 PM
Jeff Walker, love your comment, I absolutely agree!
Deborah Verran's comment, August 16, 2013 9:57 PM
Looking forward to Web 3.0 and everything that follows
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33rd Square | Daniel Dennett Offers Tools For Thinking

In his recently published Intuition Pumps And Other Tools for Thinking, philosopher and scientist Daniel Dennett breaks down the rhetorical signals that can indicate a shifty argument.

Via Spaceweaver
mtmeme's insight:

Interesting talk, and another book for my reading list. Hint at a future book on Cultural Evolution. Must do searches for "surely" and "rather" in articles of interest - as red flags for sneaky deception. 

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Never Ending Image Learning

How does a computer know what a car looks like? How does it know sheep are white? Can a computer learn all these just by browsing images on the Internet? We believe so!

 

NEIL (Never Ending Image Learner) is a computer program that runs 24 hours per day and 7 days per week to automatically extract visual knowledge from Internet data. It is an effort to build the world’s largest visual knowledge base with minimum human labeling effort – one that would be useful to many computer vision and AI efforts. See current statistics about how much NEIL knows about our world!!


Via Spaceweaver
mtmeme's insight:

How useful will this be?

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A guide to contemporary classical music | Music | The Guardian

A guide to contemporary classical music | Music | The Guardian | wrightmindweb | Scoop.it
Tom Service's weekly guide to contemporary classical music
mtmeme's insight:

Wonderful resource!

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IBM’s predictions for next five years: everything will learn | KurzweilAI

IBM’s predictions for next five years: everything will learn | KurzweilAI | wrightmindweb | Scoop.it
(Credit: IBM) IBM just unveiled its annual 5 in 5 -- five predictions about technology innovations that IBM expects will change the way we work, live and

Via Spaceweaver
mtmeme's insight:

Worth a listen!

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Spaceweaver's curator insight, December 20, 2013 11:42 AM

An interesting 5 short videos worth watching.

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Writing Bytes

Writing Bytes | wrightmindweb | Scoop.it
Writers in a variety of genres tell us what new technologies mean for storytelling.
mtmeme's insight:

The Internet isn't one thing - it is constantly changing thought. What better premise for new genres! lw

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Animations: This Thing Called Science

Animations: This Thing Called Science | wrightmindweb | Scoop.it
We're thrilled to launch our next series of animations: This Thing Called Science. This series follows on from Critical Thinking, showing the way we think scientifically by considering skepticism, ...

Via Beth Dichter
mtmeme's insight:

Great series for introduction to scientific concepts and research methods. When we are aware of sources of bias we can devise ways to test for it or eliminate it. 

more...
Beth Dichter's curator insight, September 11, 2013 9:31 PM

This is a fabulous series that explore science. Six animated videos are available that show "the way we think scientifically by considering skepticism, testing, blinding, uncertainty  ethics and citizen science." By title they are:

* This Thing Called Science Part 1: Call me skeptical

* This Thing Called Science Part 2: Testing, testing, 1, 2, 3

* This Thing Called Science Part 3: Blinded by Science

* This Thing Called Science Part 4: Confidently Uncertain

* This Thing Called Science Part 5: Do the Right Thing

* This Thing Called Science Part 6: Citizen Science

These videos were created by Bridge8, who also put out a great series of videos on Critical Thinking. You can find that series at http://bridge8.wordpress.com/2012/01/30/critical-thinking-animations/

There are also 2 guides available for the Critical Thinking series, a postcard size one and an extended one. I found these on YouTube when I accessed the video Critical Thinking Part 1: A Valuable Argument uploaded by techNyouvids.

Miro Svetlik's curator insight, September 12, 2013 3:45 AM

These cartoons are really sweet and very well done. Nice way to explain the though process behind the science, make sure to see at least one of them.

Hanis's curator insight, July 22, 3:50 PM

Learn more about Science by first understanding the Scientific Process. These videos above make it much more easier to understand the topic. 

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The New Science of Mind

The New Science of Mind | wrightmindweb | Scoop.it
A better understanding of the workings of the brain means that psychiatric disorders are increasingly seen as being based in biology.
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First human brain-to-brain interface | KurzweilAI

First human brain-to-brain interface | KurzweilAI | wrightmindweb | Scoop.it
University of Washington researcher Rajesh Rao, left, plays a computer game with his mind. Across campus, researcher Andrea Stocco, right, wears a magnetic

Via Spaceweaver
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luiy's curator insight, August 30, 2013 12:14 PM

University of Washington researchers have performed what they believe is the first noninvasive human-to-human brain interface, with one researcher able to send a brain signal via the Internet to control the hand motions of a fellow researcher.

Using electrical brain recordings and a form of magnetic stimulation, Rajesh Rao sent a brain signal to Andrea Stoccoon the other side of the UW campus, causing Stocco’s finger to move on a keyboard.

While researchers at Duke University have demonstrated brain-to-brain communication between two rats, and Harvard researchers have demonstrated it between a human and a rat, Rao and Stocco believe this is the first demonstration of human-to-human brain interfacing.

“The Internet was a way to connect computers, and now it can be a way to connect brains,” Stocco said. “We want to take the knowledge of a brain and transmit it directly from brain to brain.”

Duarte Terencio's curator insight, September 1, 2013 3:15 AM

De plus en plus sympa

 

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How to Make an Infographic

How to Make an Infographic | wrightmindweb | Scoop.it
Hello, World! Lots of my friends have been asking me how I make the infographics. I find it very simple. But, I admit that that simple mindset is after hundreds of hours playing with Piktochart. I ...

Via Beth Dichter
mtmeme's insight:

Great tool

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Dean J. Fusto's comment, September 8, 2013 11:13 AM
Thanks for posting this...I'll try it soon.
Marteana Davidson's comment, September 8, 2013 9:41 PM
I'm going to try this with my production report on hour my facility is used each year!
Piktochart's comment, September 26, 2013 2:15 AM
Hi Kimberly! Thanks for thumbs up!
Also we ask teachers to fill a survey that could help us to improve. Maybe you could find a few minutes to fill it yourself and pass to other teachers who use it? Thanks!
ow.ly/oJahy
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40 Maps That Will Help You Make Sense of the World

40 Maps That Will Help You Make Sense of the World | wrightmindweb | Scoop.it
  If you're a visual learner like myself, then you know maps, charts and infographics can really help bring data and information to life. Maps can make a point resonate with readers and this c...

Via Beth Dichter
mtmeme's insight:

These are amazing!

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Linda Alexander's curator insight, August 15, 2013 10:29 AM
I love this infographic on world maps. Enjoy!
Olivier Aidyn's curator insight, August 16, 2013 12:44 AM

good work dude

Olivier Aidyn's comment, August 16, 2013 9:10 AM
Such a great infographics !
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Can Playing Video Games Give Girls an Edge In Math?

Can Playing Video Games Give Girls an Edge In Math? | wrightmindweb | Scoop.it
Playing an action video game “can virtually eliminate” the gender difference in a basic capacity researchers call spatial attention, while at the same time reducing the gender difference in the ability to mentally rotate objects, a higher-level...

Via Beth Dichter
mtmeme's insight:

Spatial skill practice in a game environment - wonder if it would also be beneficial in rehab for stroke or neurological disorders.  

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, July 27, 2013 9:09 PM

If you have wondered why spatial skills matter this post states "The ability to mentally manipulate shapes and otherwise understand how the three-dimensional world works turns out to be an important predictor of creative and scholarly achievements, according to research published this month in the journal Psychological Science."

Why is this important? It turns out that spatial skills at the age of 13 turn out to predict "the likelihood that the individual would develop new knowledge and produce innovation in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, the domains collectively known as STEM."

For more information on this as well as links to additional resources check out this post.

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Human Insight at Machine Scale | Narrative Science

Human Insight at Machine Scale | Narrative Science | wrightmindweb | Scoop.it
For a while now, we have been talking about Quill as providing human insight at machine scale. So, what do we mean by that? It’s actually pretty
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Imagine if all of the data we have on the Brain could be fed into these algorythms - we might have a coherent understanding of how it works! 

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MEDITATION USES NEUROPLASTICITY TO RE-WIRE OUR BRAINS FOR LESS ANXIETY

MEDITATION USES NEUROPLASTICITY TO RE-WIRE OUR BRAINS FOR LESS ANXIETY | wrightmindweb | Scoop.it
Scientists at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center have succeeded in identifying the specific brain functions involved in meditation.
mtmeme's insight:

What you do with your mind matters. 

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