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Out of Africa – Did the Colonial Powers ever Really Leave?

Out of Africa – Did the Colonial Powers ever Really Leave? | World Regional Geography | Scoop.it
Africa may have achieved independence, but the old colonial ties are still important as France’s decision to send troops to Mali to fight Islamist extremists shows.

Via Seth Dixon
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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 19, 10:27 AM

This infographic was very interesting.  By using color coding it highlights the areas of influence the colonel powers still maintain over their old possessions.  This map is helpful in understanding how this affects the politics of theses regions today.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 25, 12:59 PM

Colonial ties are still very prevalent due to Europe's dependence upon the resources of Africa. European countries like England and France invest billions in Africa, not to help those African nations, but to build infrastructure for resource extraction or to keep governments stable. Though the true exploitation of Africa has ended, the current situation certainly has the ring of exploitation as the people of Europe enjoy the diamonds and chocolate harvested by the multitudes of impoverished people of Africa.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 4:04 PM

Colony powers are still located within Africa. Just because Africa is technically independent doesn't mean that British Colonial power isn't still in place.

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A Life Revealed

A Life Revealed | World Regional Geography | Scoop.it
Seventeen years after she stared out from the cover of National Geographic, a former Afghan refugee comes face-to-face with the world once more.

 

The original cover is one of the more famous National Geographic photos of all time, and yet the woman in the photograph has not lived a life as though millions of people could recognize her eyes.  This is her story. 


Via Seth Dixon
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megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 1:08 AM
But by looking at the photo we can see the beauty out of all the pain.
Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, December 16, 2013 1:49 AM

This photo is in Rome, where there is an exhibit based on NGS photos, and in Las Vegas as well. In both places the lines were long to get in.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 10:00 AM

This is basically a publicity stunt. When someone puts a specific cover on a magazine, they are looking for a certain kind of attention. Yes, this woman has faced some hardships in her life but not the brutal and intense things that this magazine may have stirred up.

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A quieter drug war in Mexico, but no less deadly

A quieter drug war in Mexico, but no less deadly | World Regional Geography | Scoop.it
Months have gone by since the last of the grisly mass killings that have marked the conflict’s darkest moments.

Via Seth Dixon
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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 4, 12:13 PM

As military and government officials stepped in to control the drug wars, cartels have made greater efforts to quiet their attacks. Although the attacks are quieter, they are still happening at constant rates. As cartels clash into eachother, more problems arrive and once again question the legalization of marijuana.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 4, 12:28 PM

This article talks about the realization of the Mexician drug war and the way that these riots have affected Mexican land overall. For example the statistics of the violence against the Mexican military army for 2011-2012 is alarming; there has been 503 Attacks, 181 Injjuries and, 31 deaths of the people who are sworn to protect the citizens.

Paige Therien's curator insight, February 6, 3:02 PM

The new president of Mexico, Enrique Pena Nieto, has been trying to make the Cartel and governments fighting less apparent.  In a war, each side has to learn how to play the other's game, which is what is happening here.  Perhaps the Cartel is going along with this so they can "test the waters" of this new president and his very different policies (compared to Felipe Calderon).  Nieto wants to focus less on the drug wars, so the Cartel is laying low in northern rural areas, so they can still smuggle drugs into and guns out of the United States.