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Gravity...

Gravity... | world population map | Scoop.it

"The video clip shows the cliff where the fall initiated, near the ledge close to the skyline.  Then, below the ledge, you can see the talus cone, which are rocky bits along the slope. The really large boulders that fell down and ruined the house have carved out soil ruts as the boulders rolled downhill." http://geographyeducation.org/2014/01/30/gravity/


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YEC Geo's curator insight, January 31, 2014 1:42 PM

Gravity-induced erosion in action.

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, February 3, 2014 2:04 PM

Gravity

Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, February 5, 2014 3:13 PM

There are some things that just cannot be avoided like this rock that gouged its way down a hill, destroying part of a home and the landscape. Will we ever be in time to predict their coming and avoid such disasters from happening?

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Quick Study: Lifelong music training may help stave off hearing loss

Quick Study: Lifelong music training may help stave off hearing loss | world population map | Scoop.it
Study finds that lifelong music training may help stave off hearing loss in later years.

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Andrew McCluskey's curator insight, January 15, 2014 7:22 PM

Ooooh look - more benefits associated with early musical training - apparently your hearing stays with you longer if you've had musical training for 6 years before you were 16.  This is the standout line for me:

"..a 70 year old musician understood speech in a noisy environment as well as a 50 year old non-musician"

I'd say that's pretty useful and worthy of getting your kid on an instrument - wouldn't you?

 

Image Credit: I blame this on you, Bundeswehr! by Stefan Imhoff on Flickr

http://www.flickr.com/photos/kogakure/4021061887/

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Historical Metropolitan Populations of the United States

Historical Metropolitan Populations of the United States | world population map | Scoop.it

"The graph and tables on this page attempt to show how the urban hierarchy of the United States has developed over time. The statistic used here is the population of the metropolitan area (contiguous urbanized area surrounding a central city), not the population of an individual city. Metropolitan area population is much more useful than city population as an indicator of the size and importance of a city, since the official boundaries of a city are usually arbitrary and often do not include vast suburban areas. For example, in 2000 San Antonio was the 10th largest city in the U.S., larger than Boston or San Francisco, but its Metro Area was only ranked about 30th. The same thing was happening even back in 1790: New York was the biggest single city, but Philadelphia plus its suburbs of Northern Liberties and Southwark made it the biggest metro area."


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Paige Therien's curator insight, February 3, 2014 11:29 AM

This information is a helpful illustrator for someone who knows about the geography and history of the United States.  It is important to note the use of "metropolitan populations" rather than "city populations" within particular city borders; as the creator states, "boundaries of a city are usually arbitrary".  In other words, the information that can be given from a "city" do not tell the whole story.  Metropolitan areas, even if spanning out of city borders, share similar local culture dynamics, industry, and infrastructure as the core city.  If one was to just examine the cities and not the entire metropolitan areas of the Northeast Megalopolis, they would be missing a huge part of the puzzle. Depending on the time period, the demanded resources, and the available technologies heavily influence how metropoloitan areas work, grow, and interact with others.   This can be seen in the charts and tables.  For example, the availability of the automobile and other transportation methods deeply affected how people and industry move and how metropolitan areas influence and interact with one another.

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 17, 2014 10:26 AM

Comparing and contrasting numbers is a huge part of todays world. Looking at this chart, it indicates the size of the population of the whole metropolitan area. The difference in size of cities and of areas differs greatly and the examples provided can show how the area of a city is different that its Metro Area ranking.

Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, April 8, 2015 1:55 PM

I was a little confused by this graph at first, as I thought it was measuring population rather than the ranking of the respective metro areas. It is still just as telling, however, even if it is not measuring population. Despite the fact that the lines get a bit jumbled at times, it really is a fascinating graph to look at. It is representative of some tangible and traceable geographic trends that occurred as a result of politics or economics. It is especially interesting to note the decrease in rank of many northeastern metro areas and their replacement by metro areas in the western or central parts of the country. This is, of course, symbolic of the westward expansion of the country during the mid to early 1800s and the decline of the northeast as the dominant population center of the country. 

 

There are some things in particular that are interesting to note as an historian. For instance, New York's almost perfectly constant place as the largest metro area in the country says a lot about where the country is centered economically and socially. The rapid emergence of Los Angeles as a major metro area in the early 1900s speaks to the new wave of immigration that was occurring at that time. These trends, though not shown on or accompanied by a map, are very telling. Anyone with a basic knowledge of geography and U.S. history can see why certain things trend the way that they do. This graph also reinforces my belief that geography is an absolutely pivotal part of history. It is important to know where things are when you are talking about them in an historical context, or else you will have no visual reference or background and events may seem confusing or unclear. 

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AdhereTech Introduces Wireless Pill Bottle To Ensure Patients Take Their Meds | TechCrunch

AdhereTech Introduces Wireless Pill Bottle To Ensure Patients Take Their Meds  | TechCrunch | world population map | Scoop.it
Prescription drug adherence is a big problem in the U.S., costing the healthcare system hundreds of millions of dollars per year and often leading to health complications for patients who don’t follow their doctors’ orders. A startup called AdhereTech thinks it has a solution to that problem: a wireless pill bottle that alerts patients when they have to take their meds and keeps track of their usage and dosage.

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Muslims around the world celebrate the birth of Mohammed

Muslims around the world celebrate the birth of Mohammed | world population map | Scoop.it

"Muslims around the world celebrate the birth of the Islamic Prophet Muhammed, who was born in Mecca, Saudi Arabia in 570 AD. His birthday is marked in way ways is different Muslim countries."  


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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, March 26, 2014 2:50 PM

Muslims rejoice, celebrate and honor Mohammed around the world on his birthday. These photos not only represent the celebrations of Mohammed but mark his lasting legacy and influence as an Islamic Prophet.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 5, 2014 2:53 PM

It is nice to see a depiction of the celebrations and happiness of Muslims instead of just violence by radicals. Muslims are frequently misrepresented by the heavy news coverage of the tiny amount of evildoers. It would be like depicting all of the US as Klan members.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, November 4, 2014 1:52 PM

Women and Men in some Islamic countries live entirely different lives in regards to their geographic spheres. The women dominate the private sphere, they are sheltered from the public sphere. Their architecture reflects that fact. Windows and balconies are constructed so people can see out but not see in from the street. Homes are built so the houses across from one another are not lined up with the front doors directly across from one another. Streets are winding and made so the homes are extremely private. This reflects society in regards to how people view gender. Females are kept out of the public sphere and when they do venture out into the streets, they are encouraged to have a male escorting them. This image above shows the balcony as a barrier keeping females "protected" from the public sphere.

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Why Songs Get Stuck in Your Head

Why Songs Get Stuck in Your Head | world population map | Scoop.it
Enjoyable now; maddening later.

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Andrew McCluskey's curator insight, January 17, 2014 7:36 PM

This article is really a primer for the book that goes with it - On Repeat: How Music Plays the Mind, by Elizabeth Hellmuth Margulis.  As an introduction to earworms and the psychology behind it - it reads terribly academically and before you know it you're deep in existential exposition from a Freudian theorist - awesome!   Still - if you're into music psychology it's worth a read and the book does look interesting.

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Four Keys To Workplace Innovation

Four Keys To Workplace Innovation | world population map | Scoop.it
Innovation isn’t the purview of lone geniuses being struck, lightening style, by inspiration out of the blue. Rather it comes from creative, intelligent people who routinely encounter different perspectives and are frequently exposed to new concepts.

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Chris Farrance's curator insight, January 17, 2014 4:16 AM

I like this to be underpinned by a 'tight/loose' process that encourages engagement and doesn't stifle creativity

 

aanve's curator insight, March 23, 2014 11:26 PM

www.aanve.com

 

Cathy Matthews's curator insight, March 24, 2014 9:22 AM

Easy to implement solutions that make sense! For example, brainstorming - engaging thinkers with different skill sets across your organization - is a proven strategy that keeps the team involved,  motivated  and excited to find solutions and remain at the top of their game.

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Dramatic Greenland Ice Melt

Scientists capture dramatic footage of Arctic glaciers melting in hours Scientists have captured dramatic footage of massive lakes in the Arctic melting away...

 

An amazingly extreme place that is far removed from inhabited regions of our planet, but still heavily impacted by people nonetheless.  


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Josue Maroquin's comment, August 12, 2013 10:10 PM
It shows us how humanity impacts the planet wherever we are
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Why You Should Convert Your Music To 432 Hz

Why You Should Convert Your Music To 432 Hz | world population map | Scoop.it
The way frequencies affect the physical world has been demonstrated through various experiments such as the science of Cymatics and water memory.

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Andrew McCluskey's curator insight, January 9, 2014 7:27 PM

I played in a band where the guitar players all tuned down to Eb - they swore that it gave a much better tone and depth of sound which was nice for them but you try playing blues piano in Ab / Eb and various combinations of!!  Like the author states at the end of the article - not everything here is proven or potentially true - but there's definitely something to the whole energy thing.  It makes super logical sense that 342hz would resonate more deeply and I did like the comparisons between how people experienced 432 against the 440 standard that we operate with.  If you're interested in this area have a read and suspend judgment when it gets a bit too "New Agey!" 

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The Benefits of Listening to Music at Work [INFOGRAPHIC] | CareerBliss

The Benefits of Listening to Music at Work [INFOGRAPHIC] | CareerBliss | world population map | Scoop.it
If your workplace allows you to listen to music on your headphones, there are many reasons to take advantage of this little office perk! Music is a lot...

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tulasiraolanke's curator insight, January 23, 2014 1:21 PM

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N4x_LU6szyg&feature=youtu.be

Christopher Coleman's curator insight, January 23, 2014 3:46 PM

Just think how great it is if your work IS music!  Oh.  Doesn't work that way?

Celia Castillo's curator insight, January 24, 2014 6:06 AM

Una manera molt gràfica de representar els beneficis d'escoltar música a la feina :)

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The People’s Guide to Spatial Thinking

The People’s Guide to Spatial Thinking | world population map | Scoop.it

"One of our colleagues and leaders in spatial thinking in education, Dr. Diana Stuart Sinton, has written a book entitled The People’s Guide to Spatial Thinking, along with colleagues Sarah Bednarz, Phil Gersmehl, Robert Kolvoord, and David Uttal.  As the name implies, the book provides an accessible and readable way for students, educators, and even the general public to understand what spatial thinking is and why it matters.  It “help[s] us think across the geographies of our life spaces, physical and social spaces, and intellectual space.”  Dr. Sinton pulls selections from the NRC’s Learning to Think Spatially report and ties them to everyday life.  In so doing, she also provides ways for us in the educational community to think about teaching these concepts and skills in a variety of courses.   Indeed, as she points out, spatial thinking is particularly essential within science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, as well as geography."  - See more at: ESRI's GIS Education Community blog. 


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Fran Martin's curator insight, January 31, 2014 4:07 AM

Useful for what we mean when we say 'thinking geographically'.

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, January 31, 2014 6:17 PM

Educação geográfica! 

Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, February 2, 2014 7:02 PM

Guía popular de pensamiento espacial.

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Apple hires medical tech experts, fueling iWatch rumours

Apple hires medical tech experts, fueling iWatch rumours | world population map | Scoop.it
A smartwatch with next-generation health skills could help Apple beat rivals in the wearable technology sector

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Not Just a Southern Thing: The Changing Geography of American Poverty

Not Just a Southern Thing: The Changing Geography of American Poverty | world population map | Scoop.it
Thirty years ago, the states with the deepest poverty were all clustered in dixie. But the rest of the country has been playing catchup.

 

So how did poverty stop being a Southern specialty? You've had, deindustrialization in the Midwest and Northeast. And you've had fast growing Hispanic populations, which tend to be poorer, in California, Nevada, Arizona, and Colorado (as well as North Carolina and Georgia, which could explain their presence on the list above).  Meanwhile, the Southeast has made some economic progress by attracting foreign manufacturing, among other efforts.


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viknesh's curator insight, March 2, 2014 9:42 AM

When Americans think of poverty, they often times think of the southern states. However, that was most accurate 30 years ago. As time progesses, other states, especially New York, have been catching up drastically. Poverty is not only a southern thing, but a factor in on the growing rates of low income households across the United States. Although the quality of life among the states of low income households may vary, the povery levels do not.

Nick Smith's curator insight, September 2, 2014 4:19 PM

Poverty, no longer a southern thing. What has changed this?

Nicholas Patrie's curator insight, October 20, 2014 12:16 PM

not only has poverty increased drastically in the south and spread west but also states that where considered to be low percentage of poverty have increased to poverty. many states up north are now in danger. the economy hasn't increased at all in the last twenty plus years and it should be interesting to see what happens in the future, hopefully the south doesn't get too far under the poverty line to the point where it can't be brought back.

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How Foreign Retired Government Officials Use Guanxi in China

How Foreign Retired Government Officials Use Guanxi in China | world population map | Scoop.it
How Foreign Retired Government Officials Use Guanxi in China ,Chinadaily Forum

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Henry Huh's insight:

one of them we need to know if you run business in China

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8 Surprising Ways Music Affects and Benefits our Brains - - The Buffer Blog

8 Surprising Ways Music Affects and Benefits our Brains - - The Buffer Blog | world population map | Scoop.it
I’m a big fan of music, and use it a lot when working, but I had no idea about how it really affects our brains and bodies.

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Andrew McCluskey's curator insight, November 21, 2013 2:35 PM

Great article from one of my favorite writers - Belle Beth Cooper - we've covered most of these studies in the past but it's a solid list that gives some useful insight into how music affects us all.

Phil LAUGRAND's curator insight, November 25, 2013 2:34 AM

not surprised at all... music is the center of life !

Maria Dolores Gómez's curator insight, January 25, 2014 8:54 AM

I can´t live without music, now I know why.

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Welcome to 'Geography Education'

Welcome to 'Geography Education' | world population map | Scoop.it

Finding Materials: This site is designed for geography students and teachers to find interesting, current supplemental materials.  To search for place-specific posts, browse this interactive map.  To search for thematic posts, see http://geographyeducation.org/thematic/ (organized by the APHG curriculum).  Also you can search for a keyword by clicking on the filter tab above.


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Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 18, 2014 2:10 PM

Geography and current events

Olivier Tabary's curator insight, November 28, 2014 12:06 PM

Many interesting tools to practice and to discover

Jamie Mitchell's curator insight, March 8, 1:04 AM

Amazing resources about places and topics in Geography