World of Street & Outdoor Arts
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World of Street & Outdoor Arts
Expression of freedom, for the freedom, by the free-minded artists : Street Art, Outdoor installation, Public Art, etc. StreetArt daily at Paper.li >> https://paper.li/vagabond60/1351716375
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Street Art Examined

This was a student project for a TH 635 Editing class at Ohio State University under Janet Parrott.
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SEE ONE Merges Graffiti and Street Art Abstractly with His Flying "Shards"

SEE ONE Merges Graffiti and Street Art Abstractly with His Flying "Shards" | World of Street & Outdoor Arts | Scoop.it

A New York native, See One is a self-taught visual artist with a big imagination which was electrified as a kid in the city seeing graffiti growing up in the 1980s. Constantly drawing for hours on end as a child, he was also inspired by the characters, cartoons, and comic books of the time and he began creating his own world at a young age in sketchbooks and on walls. His initial pieces on the street were character-based and paid homage to that earlier New York traditional graffiti style, and he still likes that too.

Around 2009 See One began to experiment and develop a more abstract style for his works on canvas and on the street, using a recurring symbol that he now refers to as “Shards”. As his style evolved, a new world opened before him as his swift and swooping hand and arm movements produced fluid and jagged abstract graffiti patterns that fly and flow, evoking broken shards of glass that inhabit a third dimension, making the art pop off the wall. With this new practice, See One effectively opened a door for himself to combine graffiti and Street Art influences into one distinctive vision....

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See No Evil: Europe's largest street art event

See No Evil: Europe's largest street art event | World of Street & Outdoor Arts | Scoop.it
72 artists. 13,000 spray cans. Europe’s largest street art event. So read the August 2011 tagline of See No Evil, an ambitious event designed to celebrate the art form that put my hometown city of Bristol on the international map.
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street art

street art | World of Street & Outdoor Arts | Scoop.it

Que demander de plus pour un look que de le mêler à un magnifique

collage urbain ?! Cette artiste est incroyable, elle fascine par son style dessin,

par ses poupées russes façon mutante, ses mutltitudes de couleurs.

On en trouve aux 4 coins de Bruxelles... et il est impossible de ne pas s'arrêter un instant pour les observer.

Avez-vous déjà eu l'occasion d'en découvrir ?

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Musing on Street Art vis-à-vis Icy and Sot

Musing on Street Art vis-à-vis Icy and Sot | World of Street & Outdoor Arts | Scoop.it

The other day, in a somewhat drowsy effort to shake my late-summer torpor, I decided to poke around online in search of some intriguing, under-the-radar gallery shows. Rather quickly, and despite (or perhaps because of) the aimless, unfocused nature of my ramblings, I happened upon the just-concluded show Icy and Sot: Made in Iran, which ran August 23-25 at New York’s Openhouse Gallery.

As I viewed the artists’ work, I felt my mental haze dissipating and giving way to the thrill of visual engagement that accompanies the best street art. The artists, two brothers from the Iranian city of Tabriz known as “Icy” and “Sot” (pseudonyms, they have said, that help them to elude detection by the Iranian government), have been garnering attention for their bold, stencil-based images. Oscillating between playful irreverence and pointed political critique, their work is increasingly ubiquitous both on streets and in galleries around the world.

Employing a striking palette composed primarily of black, gray, white, and red, Icy and Sot convey a visceral sense of human vitality and an instinctive attunement to the raw, contrasting textures of social existence. Many of their works appeared initially on the streets of Tabriz of Tehran and were subsequently replicated for gallery display, one notable example being Broken Heart, a vivid re-imagining of Bansky’s Balloon Girl....

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LA’s WAR ON STREET ART | Revok1

LA’s WAR ON STREET ART | Revok1 | World of Street & Outdoor Arts | Scoop.it

-by SIMONE WILSON of the LA Weekly

Back when L.A. graffiti artist Sight was a teenager, he began slipping out of his mom’s South Central home late at night, armed with a razor blade or a can of spray paint, to claim the city’s surfaces as his own.

“When you go out in the nighttime, there’s nobody out there,” he recalls. “There’s a full moon; the air’s crisp. I’m with just me and my thoughts. It’s a beautiful experience.”

Marilyn Avila, Sight’s high school sweetheart and, now, the mother of his two children — 6-month-old Sofia and 18-month-old Adam — says, “I saw how happy it made him. It almost freed his mind.”

Sight was so prolific in his early days that he was known by peers, and graffiti watchers at large, as the “King of South Central.”

Avila recalls: “We would get on the bus, and if there was other graf artists in there, he would know almost all of them. If not, he’ll be, like, ‘Oh, I’m Sight,’ and they’ll be, like, ‘What?! You’re Sight?!’ ”

By the time the young vandal began attending Los Angeles City College, though, he claims he didn’t have time for the all-night branding sprees of his adolescence. He was working two jobs on top of journalism classes, and drove a car instead of riding and cutting up windows on the bus.

When he did break out the spray paint, says Sight, now 30, he had evolved from bus scribing and tagging to throwing up (spray-painting his name in big bubbly letters) and piecing (collaborating with friends on complex, mural-type works). His code of ethics was: “We’re not going to write on anything that looks good. We’d look for abandoned buildings, and walls that were really tagged up. We’d want to put some color right there.”

Along with his dream of becoming a journalist, Sight hoped to publish poetry and learn to piece like Saber and Revok, his heroes in the legendary Mad Society Kings (MSK) crew.

“It was like springtime,” he says of the early 2000s. “Everything was blossoming — there was so much potential...

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Huge "Trompe L'oeil" painting on London Hotel

Huge "Trompe L'oeil" painting on London Hotel | World of Street & Outdoor Arts | Scoop.it

450 square meter trompe l'oeil painted on a London Hotel near St. Pancras

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You´re never too young to dream BIG – In London, England

You´re never too young to dream BIG – In London, England | World of Street & Outdoor Arts | Scoop.it
We declare the world as our canvas...
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Street Art pour Pigeons – Combo « Whitezine | Design Graphic & Photography Inspirations

Street Art pour Pigeons – Combo « Whitezine | Design Graphic & Photography Inspirations | World of Street & Outdoor Arts | Scoop.it

My name is Joseph Ayoub also known as rade ! I'm whitezine's creator and a real workaholic. I love fashion and design, can't live more than 24 hours without music, and have a huge collection of geeky tees

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Street Artist : Mozart avec des bouteilles

À Copenhague, un artiste de talent joue "Eine Kleine Nachtmusik" de Mozart avec des bouteilles. Ce stret artiste se produit en plein cœur de la ville mais se déplace souvent.
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Windmill Street Art Raises Alternative Energy Awareness

Windmill Street Art Raises Alternative Energy Awareness | World of Street & Outdoor Arts | Scoop.it

Visitors to downtown Ann Arbor have been treated to a striking display of night time colored lights this summer, as wind-powered Whirlydoodleshave appeared on light poles, and in parks and parking structures around the city.Created by local inventor Timothy R. Jones, the Whirlydoodle is a fully functional miniature wind powered generator that produces beautiful spinning colors in response to the wind. With no batteries or cords, the resulting color show provides a striking and memorable visual display of prevailing wind patterns, while demonstrating the power and potential of alternative wind energy.

Wind causes the Whirlydoodle’s blades to rotate, powering a generator that produces electricity for the multicolored LEDs (light emitting diodes) mounted on the blades. At low speeds, only individual colors appear on the Whirlydoodle, which are followed by alternating colors at higher speeds. Still higher wind speeds cause additional colors to appear and the lights to become brighter, up to a maximum of about 30 MPH wind speed. An effect called persistence of vision creates the visual perception of colors that appear to change and blend.

Inventor Timothy Jones originally installed several Whirlydoodles on light poles in downtown Ann Arbor as a “guerilla” street art project to raise awareness of alternative energy. A QR code attached to the windmills led to an online survey where viewers could vote on whether they liked the Whirlydoodles. The public survey response was over 95% positive, and merchants were vocal in their appreciation of the mysterious Whirlydoodles in front of their stores. In response, the Ann Arbor Downtown Development Authority has now officially sanctioned their presence, and the Whirlydoodles have appeared in several other locations with official municipal blessings...

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Pablo Delgado: Street Art Festival

Pablo Delgado: Street Art Festival | World of Street & Outdoor Arts | Scoop.it
Pablo Delgado creates street art that is anything but conventional. His work features miniature scenes by sidewalks portraying strange characters in strange environments.
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Geisha Street Art – The art of HUSH

Geisha Street Art – The art of HUSH | World of Street & Outdoor Arts | Scoop.it
The art of HUSH, between Geisha and Street Art… Watch more street art by HUSH here Watch more street art by HUSH here...
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Street art: Virtual museum aims to catalogue public art around the world

Street art: Virtual museum aims to catalogue public art around the world | World of Street & Outdoor Arts | Scoop.it

At a street corner along Queen St. W. some months ago, a not-altogether-flattering picture of Mayor Rob Ford was pasted up over the broken-down signage of an auto body shop. Within days, it disappeared.

Three kilometres southeast, near Lake Shore Blvd. W. and Dan Leckie Way, an oversized red boat crowns Canoe Landing Park, designed by Vancouver artist Douglas Coupland.

As public art goes, the first was illegal and short-lived; the second cost roughly $8 million and will endure for decades. For Big Art Mob, a London, U.K.-based startup, it’s all fodder for an ambitious online project that launches Friday: “a huge sprawling global museum of public art,” in the words of founder Alfie Dennen.

Users are invited to upload images of anything they think counts as “public art” — from the hastiest graffiti tag to the grandest baroque fountain — and tag each with a location, creating a navigable, crowdsourced map.

The site was in beta-testing for most of August, with only the first 500 users allowed to sign up and try it. Yet all of Kelowna, B.C., has already been mapped, while Toronto has a measly nine posts. Dennen is putting out “a klaxon call to residents (of Toronto) to map their city.”

Because Big Art Mob grew out of an earlier U.K.-based public art project, London and other British cities are well covered. Users in Brazil and Malaysia have also contributed posts in recent weeks. A smartphone app is “nearly there,” and should be available soon.

Dennen sees Big Art Mob as the “flipside” of the Art Project, a Google venture that has digitized 30,000 works of art in 151 museums worldwide. Big Art Mob, on the other hand, will capture art that exists outside of institutions, whether sanctioned by them or not....

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