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Zoomable photo of the Milky Way's center (1 Billion pixel mosaic)

Zoomable photo of the Milky Way's center (1 Billion pixel mosaic) | World of Science | Scoop.it

This image is a 1 billion pixel RVB mosaic of the galactic center region (340 millions pixels in each R,V and B color). It shows the region spanning from Sagittarius (with the Milky Way center and M8/M20 area on the left) to Scorpius (with colorful Antares and Rho Ophiuchus region on the right) and cat paw nebula (red nebula at the bottom). This mosaic was assembled from 52 different sky fields made from 1200 individual images and 200 hours total exposure time, final image size is 24000x14000 pixels. The images were taken with a SBIG STL camera + Takahashi FSQ106Ed f/3.6 telescope and NJP160 mount from the clear skies of ESO Paranal Observatory in Chile. This mosaic is one of the three parts of the ESO Gigagalaxy Zoom project together with this incredible whole sky mosaic image by ESO/S.Brunier and this fantastic ESO mosaic image of the Lagoon nebula region.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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ChronoZoom

ChronoZoom is an open-source community project dedicated to visualizing the history of everything.
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Hubble looks back 13.2 billion years in deepest view yet

Hubble looks back 13.2 billion years in deepest view yet | World of Science | Scoop.it
Combining images taken over the past 10 years in what amounts to a 2 million second time exposure, the Hubble Space Telescope has captured the deepest view of the universe yet achieved. Read this article by William Harwood on CNET News.
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World's first glimpse of black hole launchpad | Science Wire | EarthSky

World's first glimpse of black hole launchpad | Science Wire | EarthSky | World of Science | Scoop.it
Scientists are for the first time imaging the base of a massive jet of electrons and sub-atomic particles extending from the black hole at a galaxy's center.
Via Linda Liem
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NASA: Rover Finds Further Evidence That A Stream Once Ran Vigorously On Martian Surface

NASA: Rover Finds Further Evidence That A Stream Once Ran Vigorously On Martian Surface | World of Science | Scoop.it

NASA's Curiosity rover mission has found evidence a stream once ran vigorously across the area on Mars where the rover is driving. There is earlier evidence for the presence of water on Mars, but this evidence -- images of rocks containing ancient streambed gravels -- is the first of its kind.Scientists are studying the images of stones cemented into a layer of conglomerate rock. The sizes and shapes of stones offer clues to the speed and distance of a long-ago stream's flow.

 

From the size of gravels it carried, we can interpret the water was moving about 3 feet per second, with a depth somewhere between ankle and hip deep," said Curiosity science co-investigator William Dietrich of the University of California, Berkeley. "Plenty of papers have been written about channels on Mars with many different hypotheses about the flows in them. This is the first time we're actually seeing water-transported gravel on Mars. This is a transition from speculation about the size of streambed material to direct observation of it."

 

The finding site lies between the north rim of Gale Crater and the base of Mount Sharp, a mountain inside the crater. Earlier imaging of the region from Mars orbit allows for additional interpretation of the gravel-bearing conglomerate. The imagery shows an alluvial fan of material washed down from the rim, streaked by many apparent channels, sitting uphill of the new finds.

 

The rounded shape of some stones in the conglomerate indicates long-distance transport from above the rim, where a channel named Peace Vallis feeds into the alluvial fan. The abundance of channels in the fan between the rim and conglomerate suggests flows continued or repeated over a long time, not just once or for a few years.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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