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A Loving Embrace Survives Thousands of Years

A Loving Embrace Survives Thousands of Years | World History 1 | Scoop.it
The tomb at Saqqara [of Kahai] — which held this couple, their children and possibly their grandchildren — has now been studied and described by researchers at Macquarie University's Australian Cen...

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ARCE-NOLA's curator insight, November 17, 2013 12:54 PM

Beautiful new publication of the tomb of Kahai and his family.

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Peru's Warriors of the Clouds – Archaeology News from Past Horizons

Peru's Warriors of the Clouds – Archaeology News from Past Horizons | World History 1 | Scoop.it
High on a remote cliffside in northern Peru, a line of sentinels gaze out from a ledge, their unblinking eyes painted onto clay faces that guard the mummified occupants within

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David Connolly's curator insight, November 15, 2013 2:03 PM

High on a remote cliffside in northern Peru, a line of sentinels gaze out from a ledge, their unblinking eyes painted onto clay faces that guard the mummified occupants within. These are the purunmachu  – sarcophagi – in which the Chachapoya people, placed their dead.

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Early Middle Ages


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David Walp's curator insight, April 26, 2013 12:04 PM

Nice video lecture from fall of Rome through Charlemagne.

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Chinese Culture

Chinese Culture | World History 1 | Scoop.it
Cultural-china.com presents the panorama of China with tremendous information on Chinese scenery, tradition, arts, history and literature as well as the latest news on Chinese culture.

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Melissa Greentree's curator insight, September 22, 2013 7:19 AM

This is a highly recommended resource that provides a vast array of information and graphics on Chinese culture. Topics of relevance include historical figures, events, traditions and viewpoints. Navigation of these topics can be found at the side or bottom of the website. Other links of interest inlcude an overview of china and archeology and heritage.

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What have the Etruscans ever done for us? ~ Roman News and Archeology

What have the Etruscans ever done for us? ~ Roman News and Archeology | World History 1 | Scoop.it
Imagine having to write about a rock. A simple thing really? Well, no, you aren’t allowed to see the rock. All you are allowed to do is witness the splash and ripples in the pond after the rock’s been thrown in. From the size of the splash, the noise and the resulting ripples you can guess what the rock might look like in terms of size and dimensions. But it’s not the same as holding that rock in your hand. This is an apt metaphor for trying to work out the Etruscans, they were hugely influential and their ripples pulse through Roman culture yet so much of what we’d normally use to define and understand them is absent. We don’t have any Etruscan plays or writings, we rely instead on the reports of others. It’s a delicious mystery.

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The Lost City | The Age

Newspaper article re how Damian Evans and a small group of archaeologists hacked through the Cambodian landmine-strewn jungle and waded through swollen rivers and bogs to discover the ruins of five other previously unrecorded temples and evidence of ancient canals, dykes and roads, confirming data from revolutionary airborne laser scanning technology called lidar.


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How climate change impacts indigenous communities | The Archaeology News Network

How climate change impacts indigenous communities | The Archaeology News Network | World History 1 | Scoop.it

Two University of Arizona researchers have contributed to a special issue of the journal Climatic Change that centers on the impacts of climate change on tribal natural and cultural resources.


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Animal Mummies Discovered at Ancient Egyptian Site : Discovery News

Animal Mummies Discovered at Ancient Egyptian Site : Discovery News | World History 1 | Scoop.it
An ancient holy place in Egypt once known as the "Terrace of the Great God" reveals a wealth of new discoveries, from animal mummiesand human remains to a...

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Drought Led to Collapse of Civilizations, Study Says

Drought Led to Collapse of Civilizations, Study Says | World History 1 | Scoop.it
A new study shows that drought spurred the collapse of Bronze Age civilizations on the eastern shores of the Mediterranean.

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Bob DeMarco's curator insight, October 28, 2013 12:04 PM

The Alzheimer's Reading Room is the number source of information and news on Alzheimer's, dementia, health, memory loss, and treatment for the entire Alzheimer's and Dementia community worldwide. The goal of the Alzheimer's Reading Room is to Educate and Empower. http://bit.ly/a6kylR

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Female Gladiators? Tantalizing New Evidence From Ancient Rome

Female Gladiators? Tantalizing New Evidence From Ancient Rome | World History 1 | Scoop.it
Female-gladiator fights appear to have been rare spectacles in the Roman Empire. But new analysis of a statue in a German museum adds to the evidence that trained women did fight to the death in ancient amphitheaters, ...

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Marshall Shogun Dore's curator insight, May 5, 2013 9:00 AM

How would this discovery impact on our understanding of the roles of women in ancient Rome?

What evidence suggest that the statue is a female gladiator?

Sarah Kerr's curator insight, November 21, 2013 6:05 PM

This scoop looks into an ancient artifact held in a German Museum in Hamburg that may prove evidences that women fought in battles in the Colessuem in Rome.

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The History of Islam and The Crusades

The History of Islam and The Crusades | World History 1 | Scoop.it

via Islam Exposed:

This is such an important article, I hope everyone will take the time to read. I 've heard so many arguments about the evil Crusaders on Facebook..but its time for people to understand REAL history... The Western nations have been called the imperialists for so long, that we have obscured who the real imperialists throughout history really are.

And now here we are, repeating this history again....And what have we learned from the past? Not too much, it seems. The Crusades was a defensive response to brutal Islamic aggression. It was Islam that threw the world into the dark ages..and kept it there for centuries, until finally, the west and Christendom had had enough and fought back. We are faced with this same problem again today. PLease read the article below for more insight, so that the next time Christians are villanized for the Crusades, you will be informed and armed with the truth.

This time, this terrible satanic force, Islam, will be crushed forever... No more Islam. Good riddance!
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excerpts from article

" One of the idiocies passed off for decades among Western historians is bemoaning the Crusades as evil. The Islamic world -- the Ummah -- has disseminated this imaginary charge against the West, and like fools, we have absorbed Arab lies and taken the blame to heart. But the most superficial reading of Western history should put that canard to rest...

Historians would blame the Dark Ages on the Germanic Tribes, but the Goths and Vikings readily Christianized and embraced the higher civilization of the lands they conquered. The reality is that Islamic raiding is what produced the Dark Ages. Trade and the economy collapsed under the Muslim threat, plunging Europe into stagnation.

In 1095, after centuries of Muslim aggression, Pope Urban II finally had enough, and called Christians to war. He did so after the Byzantine Empire, now broken away from Roman Catholicism, appealed for fraternal help from the Western Christians to save them from Islam. After over 4 centuries of war with Islam, the Byzantines were on the verge of collapse. Most of Spain was still under Islamic tyranny. Malta and Sicily had only been recently freed.

One may condemn the atrocities of the Crusaders, but what infuriates the objective student of history is that the far greater crimes of Islam are ignored.

The Crusades was Christendom finally fighting back, not always honorably, but against a foe which had plunged Europe into darkness for centuries.

Instead we allowed our students to be brainwashed, and force fed an Islamic line that we have to feel guilty. The Muslims invaded Southern Europe, yet somehow we Westerners are labeled the imperialists.

Islamic aggression did not end with the Crusades.

The reason Columbus headed West was because the Muslims had blocked all trade routes to the East. Yet, we are never told this.

Up until the 16th century, Italy was regularly invaded by Islam. Otranto was taken by the Turks in 1480, and held for only 10 months. Yet, it was time enough to behead over 800 Christians who refused to convert.

Piracy and kidnapping was so common that Catholic Churches in Southern Europe had donation boxes where the faithful could contribute to ransom hostages.

One could go on and on. The Islamic subjugation of Greece and the Balkans. The kidnapping of hundreds of thousands of Christian boys, over the centuries, to be forcibly converted to Islam, and compelled to serve in the Ottoman Army as Janissaries.

The Islamic attempt to take Vienna. Twice! In 1529 and 1683.

A half million or more slaves from the British Isles were kidnapped on the high seas by the religion of peace.
It was not until the U.S. Marines took on the Barbary Pirates and the French razed Algeria that Islamic predation finally stopped in the 19th century; but all of this is forgotten. Somehow, white Christians are the only villains now.

We hear the Muslims bewail about British imperialism; but the British do not want to go back to Egypt. The Muslim do want Andulasia back. We hear about French crimes in Algeria -- which were real -- but do we remember that Islamic predation that was the real agent which caused the Dark Ages. Europeans were in North Africa for only a century, but Islam pounded Europe for 1200 years. Yet, it is the Arabs who claim victim status.

But what do our politicians do, but apologize for the Crusades. Why?! Have the Muslims apologized for 1400 years of their crimes?!

Part of this idiocy stems from a hyper-liberal view of history which views European Christianity as inherently evil. It permeates the culture of academia; and refuses to see the real evil of Islam.

Sadly, a second cause is an ancillary residue of historiography which has a tradition of exaggerating the real crimes of Catholicism out of all proportion. The Spanish call this exaggeration the Black Legend of the Inquisition; and it results in a pseudo-acquittal of Islam, by blaming the Crusades on Catholicism.

Let us not forget that it was Catholic Europe which insulated Northwest European Protestants from Islam's full fury. It was Catholic Spain which eventually broke the Turkish fleet at the Battle of Lepanto in 1571. It was Catholic Poland's Jan Sobieski who saved Northwest Europe at Vienna in 1683 AD. It was the Catholic French who tamed Algeria in 1830.

Let us not forget either that it was Catholic France which saved the Christians of Lebanon in 1860 while the Protestant British were arming the Druze.

The time for apologizing to Islam must end.


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littlebytesnews's curator insight, September 10, 2013 1:31 AM

I agree, it's time to stop apologizing and appeasing our enemies! 

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Germ Theory: How Disease And Climate Change Fell The Roman Empire - KGOU

Germ Theory: How Disease And Climate Change Fell The Roman Empire - KGOU | World History 1 | Scoop.it
Germ Theory: How Disease And Climate Change Fell The Roman Empire
KGOU
University of Oklahoma historian Kyle Harper says there have been thousands of answers to what caused the fall of the Roman Empire.

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Joy Kinley's curator insight, October 27, 2013 6:22 PM

Most historians teach that Rome fell because of overexpansion, corruption and invasion.  But it makes sense that disease can foster the collapse of Rome.  Other diseases have led to the collapse of empires or systems, for example the Bubonic Plague is frequently cited as a cause of the collapse of the feudal system in Western Europe.  So overexpansion coupled with a massive outbreak would be devastating for an empire.

Nicole Balashov's curator insight, January 2, 2015 2:53 AM

The main idea of this interview is to give an aditional reasons to fall of Roman Empire, and this is spread of infective dieseases, that happen following climate changes.

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Visting Pompeii and Herculaneum - Telegraph

Visting Pompeii and Herculaneum - Telegraph | World History 1 | Scoop.it
Ask the experts: Anne Hanley, our Italy expert, suggests the best travel options for visiting Pompeii, Herculaneum and other attractions in the Naples area.

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Thousand-year old swordsman rises from the earth

Thousand-year old swordsman rises from the earth | World History 1 | Scoop.it
Archaeology hobbyists were stunned when they unearthed a remarkable historical find from a field in Janakkala, southern Finland. The ancient grave site appeared to be that of an early crusader buried with two swords from different eras.

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Matthew Ganibi's curator insight, November 25, 2013 2:00 AM

An archaeological discovery made in Janakkala, a town in the southern part of Finland.

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Evidence of prehistoric living in the Weald revealed after Broadbridge Heath excavation

Evidence of prehistoric living in the Weald revealed after Broadbridge Heath excavation | World History 1 | Scoop.it
New evidence of Stone Age and Iron Age activity in the Weald area of Sussex has been revealed by findings from archaeological excavations at a development near Horsham.

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Forget Crimewatch – the Vikings were there first |

Forget Crimewatch – the Vikings were there first | | World History 1 | Scoop.it

We think of Vikings as highly aggressive raiders who ravished Europe in the Early Middle Ages but how could these men be controlled when they returned to their homeland after plundering other countries?

 

A researcher from the University of Aberdeen, who presented today at the British Science Festival, suggested this is a problem Viking societies themselves were deeply concerned about – so much so that they took on the role of early criminal profilers – drafting descriptions of the most likely trouble-makers.

So what do you make of this?  Is this a society looking for trouble?  OR  Looking for those who cause trouble?


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50 Years In Italy: Sphinxes and Pyramids...of the Etruscans

50 Years In Italy: Sphinxes and Pyramids...of the Etruscans | World History 1 | Scoop.it

Sphinxes and Pyramids...of the Etruscans

History tells us how the Etruscan civilization was overcome by the Romans as they expanded north from the banks of the Tiber. Here in Etruria or Tuscia, 80 kilometres north of Rome, we can draw lines on the map connecting the towns of Vetralla, Tarquinia and Tuscania to make an “ Etruscan Triangle”.


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Joshua Lefkowitz's curator insight, March 6, 2014 11:07 PM

Wow I had never heard of this; although the Romans did incorporate Egyptian architecture into their own buildings(like obelisks) I did not realize that to some extent they emulated them too.

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Ancient Road Leading to Stonehenge Found : DNews

Ancient Road Leading to Stonehenge Found : DNews | World History 1 | Scoop.it
Scientists have uncovered a portion of an ancient path that may have led to Stonehenge. (All roads lead to... Stonehenge?

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Ancient Iraq revealed

Ancient Iraq revealed | World History 1 | Scoop.it

After nearly a century away, Harvard archaeology has returned to Iraq.

 

Jason Ur, the John L. Loeb Associate Professor of the Social Sciences, earlier this year launched a five-year archaeological project — the first such Harvard-led endeavor in the war-torn nation since the early 1930s — to scour a 3,200-square-kilometer area around Irbil, the capital of the Kurdish region in northern Iraq, for signs of ancient cities and towns, canals, and roads.

 

Already, Ur said, the effort is paying massive dividends — with some 1,200 potential sites identified in just a few months, and potentially thousands more in the coming years.

 

“What we’re finding is that this is, hands down, the richest archaeological landscape in the Middle East,” Ur said. “Due to the history of conflict and ethnic strife in this region, there was no work done in this area at all, so it really is a tabula rasa, so it’s a very exciting time.”

 

Unfortunately, he said, that blank slate is quickly being erased by development.


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The Intriguing Ancient Underground City of Derinkuyu

The Intriguing Ancient Underground City of Derinkuyu | World History 1 | Scoop.it

Long ago, in the region surrounding Nevsehir and Kayseri, in central Turkey, an ancient people built, or rather dug, over 200 underground cities. The deepest of these, under the present day town of Derinkuyu, delves over 250 feet below the Earth’s surface, and boasts numerous tunnels, halls, meeting rooms, wells and passages.

Because the city was carved from existing caves and underground structures that had first formed naturally, there is no way to discern, with traditional archaeological methods of dating, when exactly Derinkuyu was built. As such, and with ties to the Hittites, Phrygians and Persians, Derinkuyu presents a fascinating riddle for ancient mystery enthusiasts.

Long ago, in the region surrounding Nevsehir and Kayseri, in central Turkey, an ancient people built, or rather dug, over 200 underground cities. The deepest of these, under the present day town of Derinkuyu, delves over 250 feet below the Earth’s surface, and boasts numerous tunnels, halls, meeting rooms, wells and passages.

Because the city was carved from existing caves and underground structures that had first formed naturally, there is no way to discern, with traditional archaeological methods of dating, when exactly Derinkuyu was built. As such, and with ties to the Hittites, Phrygians and Persians, Derinkuyu presents a fascinating riddle for ancient mystery enthusiasts.


Read more at http://www.todayifoundout.com/index.php/2013/09/intriguing-ancient-underground-city-derinkuyu/#QHWQFczIYSheStzG.99

Long ago, in the region surrounding Nevsehir and Kayseri, in central Turkey, an ancient people built, or rather dug, over 200 underground cities. The deepest of these, under the present day town of Derinkuyu, delves over 250 feet below the Earth’s surface, and boasts numerous tunnels, halls, meeting rooms, wells and passages.

Because the city was carved from existing caves and underground structures that had first formed naturally, there is no way to discern, with traditional archaeological methods of dating, when exactly Derinkuyu was built. As such, and with ties to the Hittites, Phrygians and Persians, Derinkuyu presents a fascinating riddle for ancient mystery enthusiasts.


Read more at http://www.todayifoundout.com/index.php/2013/09/intriguing-ancient-underground-city-derinkuyu/#QHWQFczIYSheStzG.99

Long ago, in the region surrounding Nevsehir and Kayseri, in central Turkey, an ancient people built, or rather dug, over 200 underground cities. The deepest of these, under the present day town of Derinkuyu, delves over 250 feet below the Earth’s surface, and boasts numerous tunnels, halls, meeting rooms, wells and passages.

Because the city was carved from existing caves and underground structures that had first formed naturally, there is no way to discern, with traditional archaeological methods of dating, when exactly Derinkuyu was built. As such, and with ties to the Hittites, Phrygians and Persians, Derinkuyu presents a fascinating riddle for ancient mystery enthusiasts.


Read more at http://www.todayifoundout.com/index.php/2013/09/intriguing-ancient-underground-city-derinkuyu/#QHWQFczIYSheStzG.99

Long ago, in the region surrounding Nevsehir and Kayseri, in central Turkey, an ancient people built, or rather dug, over 200 underground cities. The deepest of these, under the present day town of Derinkuyu, delves over 250 feet below the Earth’s surface, and boasts numerous tunnels, halls, meeting rooms, wells and passages.

Because the city was carved from existing caves and underground structures that had first formed naturally, there is no way to discern, with traditional archaeological methods of dating, when exactly Derinkuyu was built. As such, and with ties to the Hittites, Phrygians and Persians, Derinkuyu presents a fascinating riddle for ancient mystery enthusiasts.


Read more at http://www.todayifoundout.com/index.php/2013/09/intriguing-ancient-underground-city-derinkuyu/#QHWQFczIYSheStzG.99


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JERRY KITH's curator insight, January 15, 2014 3:13 PM

What baffles me is many ancient civilizations lack the resources (pneumatic tools, electric drills, bull-dozers, etc) to create such a magnicificant underground cities. Or perhaps, they did have access to modern-like tools. We have an assumption that they don't, but until the day we find concrete evidence, the question still remains a mystery in my mind. 

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Japanese archaeologists find 1,400 year old Kofun-period warrior still in armor

Japanese archaeologists find 1,400 year old Kofun-period warrior still in armor | World History 1 | Scoop.it

A 1,400 year old Kofun-period warrior, still dressed in his lamellar suit of armor, was unearthed at the Harunayama Futatsudake excavation site. The warrior, together with an infant, were probably ...


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David Connolly's curator insight, December 19, 2012 5:41 AM

More on the amazing find

Ibrahim Ahmed's comment, December 23, 2012 2:58 AM
help
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Roman burial site suggests that female gladiators fought in Britain

Roman burial site suggests that female gladiators fought in Britain | World History 1 | Scoop.it
Archaeologists from the Museum of London believe they may have discovered the the first known burial site of a female Roman gladiator.

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Joy Kinley's curator insight, September 10, 2013 10:54 PM

So was she a female gladiator or gladiatrix or was she just a wealthy non-Roman?  Because she was buried with expensive items we know that she was wealthy and since she was buried outside the normal Roman graveyard we know that she was outside the norms of citizenship.  

Gladiators were not citizens of the Roman Empire, if a male citizen wanted to become one he would loose his status however women would not.

Ignacio Garrido's curator insight, September 11, 2013 2:15 AM

Exercise 8 :

 

Read the text and answer the questions by Moodle Plattform. Write the number of exercise. Good Luck

 

1. Where's the dicovered body ?

2. What kind of elements have scientific found in the grave ?

3. Write a summary of the new

4. Explain who were the gladiators

5. What is the importance of this discovering ? 

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The Roman Limes – frontiers of the Empire - The Local

The Roman Limes – frontiers of the Empire - The Local | World History 1 | Scoop.it

As the summer holidays approach, The Local is touring Germany's UNESCO World Heritage Sites. Today we visit the historic Roman Limes.

 

The Upper-Germanic Roman Limes covers a total distance of 550 kilometres. Around 2,000 years ago its forts, watchtowers, walls and palisades protected the mighty Roman Empire from independent Germania.

It is the longest and one of the most impressive archaeological monuments in Europe, marking the frontier where the highly developed civilisation of ancient Rome met 'barbaric' Germania.

The Limes run from Bad Hönningen/Rheinbrohl on the River Rhine to the Regensburg area on the River Danube. Alongside Roman remains preserved in their original condition, there are restored buildings, excavations and reconstructions. The course of the border wall can still be made out in places as it stretches in long, straight lines across forests and pastureland.


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Marines vs. Roman Army: Could the Devil Dogs Win? | Gun Digest - We Know Guns So You Know Guns

Marines vs. Roman Army: Could the Devil Dogs Win? | Gun Digest - We Know Guns So You Know Guns | World History 1 | Scoop.it

Being around so many Devil Dogs here in Eastern NC, THUMPY found this a most-interesting article over at Gun Digest's blog:

 

"Could a single Marine Expeditionary Unit of 2200 soldiers armed with state-of-the-art firearms take down the entire 330,000-man army of the Roman Empire? For a student of military firearm history it’s an intriguing question."


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Google World Wonders Project

Google World Wonders Project | World History 1 | Scoop.it
From the archaeological areas of Pompeii to the Hiroshima Peace Memorial, Google’s World Wonders Project aims to bring to life the wonders of the modern and ancient world.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Chris Manguerra's insight:

Amazing vusuals of World arachaeological areas of Pompeii

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Philippe Trebaul's curator insight, February 25, 2013 11:21 AM
Google World Wonders Project.

"From the archaeological areas of Pompeii to the Hiroshima Peace Memorial, Google’s World Wonders Project aims to bring to life the wonders of the modern and ancient world".
Google World Wonders Project via @AnaCristinaPrts http://sco.lt/...