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World Geography Education
Teaching Geography in the 21st century!
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Geographic Analysis of 2012 Presidential Election

Geographer Andy Baker provides an excellent spatial analysis of the key voting patterns that will shape the 2012 presidential election in the United States.

 

Tags: political, statistics, spatial, regions, USA.


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Jesse Gauthier's comment, October 14, 2012 12:24 PM
This video was very helpful for me because the speaker clearly gave visual examples of the many topics that can steer certain voters in the U.S. to vote a certain way, during election time. It helped me better interpret political data, since I am a visual learner.
Betty Denise's comment, October 15, 2012 3:19 AM
RT the comment !
Frank Fenn's comment, March 1, 2013 11:09 PM
I used this during the Political Unit. I find that 9th graders know nothing about politics beyond what concerns them at the moment. Stretching their brain back to when they were 7 helps build the political foundations of the future!
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Why Map Projections Matter

This is a clip from the TV show West Wing (Season 2-Episode 16) where cartography plays a key role in the plot.  In this episode the fictitious (but still on Facebook) group named "the Organization of Cartographers for Social Justice" is campaigning to have the President officially endorse the Gall-Peters Projection in schools and denounce the Mercator projection.  The argument being that children will grow up thinking some places are not as important because they are minimized by the map projection.  While a bit comical, the cartographic debate is quite informative even if it was designed to appear as though the issue was trivial. 

 

Questions to Ponder:  Why do map projections matter?  Is one global map projection inherently better than the rest?  

 

Tags: Mapping, geospatial, video, visualization. 


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Lydia Blevins's comment, September 13, 2012 3:17 AM
I think it is very important that we start using more accurate maps. In school, the maps we use are so different from how the world actually is. I agree that children will grow up thinking some places are less important because they are minimized by the map projection.
Greg Atkinson's comment, October 10, 2012 9:31 AM
Great clip. I use it in my WRG class as a comedic introduction to the power of projection.
Mary Patrick Schoettinger's curator insight, December 18, 2012 12:01 PM

This absolutely the best video clip for SS teachers EVER!

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England, Britain and the UK

England, Britain and the UK | World Geography Education | Scoop.it

This is the short version of the differences between these interrelated places and terms; the long version is much more complicated than this. 

 

Tags: Europe, political, unit 4 political, states, toponyms.


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Ally Clark/Mayse Thao's curator insight, February 7, 8:09 AM

This is kinda like the video we watched where that guy who talks fast explained the uk. Oh and this is political

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What Would Happen If The Entire World Lived Like Americans?

What Would Happen If The Entire World Lived Like Americans? | World Geography Education | Scoop.it

After making an infographic depicting how much space would be needed to house the entire world’s population based on the densities of various global cities, Tim De Chant of Per Square Mile got to thinking about the land resources it takes to support those same cities.


Tags: consumption, development, resources, energy, density, sustainability.


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Michelle Carvajal's comment, September 18, 2012 3:23 PM
Its very interesting that the United Arab Emirates would need more land mass than lets say China and the US. I guess what I'm trying to say is that the common misconception of people is that China has the greatest population. I definetely will rescoop this because people could actually see how hard it must be to house people who in essence would need all this land mass to live comfortably.
Thomas D's comment, April 22, 2013 1:13 PM
I thought that this was a very interesting graph and article to read. It shows that if the rest of the world lived like us Americans we would need four times the world’s surface, which is pretty substantial to think about. Although the United Arab Emirates is the leading this graph it’s hard to believe that America is in second. This goes to show that our way of living is out of hand, that the only reason we haven’t consumed everything is because the rest of the world is living of more reasonable amounts of resources or no resources at all. That we need to be as a country more conservative of our resources before we have to rely even more heavily than we already do on other countries. I was surprised to see that India has such a small percentage of resource consummation considering it is such a highly populated country.
Brianna Simao's comment, April 30, 2013 7:23 PM
Countries with a more advanced and urbanized way of life clearly would need more space to survive but if everyone lived like these more developed countries then natural selection dies and survival of the fittest takes over. Eventually all the natural resources would be used up. If they all continued to use the same amount and reproduce then the fertility rate would rapidly increase making the area overpopulated and the quality of life decreased. It is a good thing the entire world lives differently and has a diverse ecological footprint because it creates a balance in the world. As one country’s consumption is out of control another is holding down the fort because they lice more reasonably. It is interesting to see that even though China and India have the largest populations they don’t consume as many resources as the United States and the United Arab Emirates.
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"Million" Cities

"Million" Cities | World Geography Education | Scoop.it

From TD-architects Theo Deutinger Rotterdam.

 

Rome was the first city with one million residents, with that occuring in 5 BC.  Over a thousand years later, London and Beijing joined that group as industrialization became the impetus for wide-scale urbanization.  Today we are seeing an explosion of "million cities" throughout the world. 


Tags: urban, megacities, unit 7 cities.


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Seth Dixon's comment, September 21, 2012 10:51 AM
The data is from 2006, so it's a little dated, but still useful.
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The New World

The New World | World Geography Education | Scoop.it
An interactive series of maps show possible new additions to the world’s list of independent nations.

 

This is great way to show examples of devolution and political instability.  Included are 11 potential scenarios where further fragmentation/disintegration might occur or even greater regional integration that would redraw the map.  These case studies include: Somalia, Korea, Azerbaijan, Belgium and the Arabian Gulf Union.

 

Tags: political, devolution, supranationalism, war, autonomy, unit 4 political.


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Benjamin DeRita's comment, September 23, 2012 6:36 PM
Very interesting and informative piece, I found slide (10) especially intriguing with its discussion on the possibility of China claiming parts of Siberia.
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7 Billion, National Geographic Magazine

See photos from 7 Billion: http://bit.ly/hhYz3m With the worldwide population expected to exceed seven billion in 2011, National Geographic magazine offers a...

 

This video provides excellent material for discussing population growth, space and sustainability.


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Don Brown Jr's comment, July 9, 2012 7:18 PM
After watching the Hans Rosling video, I find it truly fascinating that the entire world’s population can fit within LA. However a solution to a rising global population may rest upon not only who has access to the resources of the world but also how it is used and proportionately divided.
Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, October 21, 2013 4:42 PM

The optimistic tone set in this peace was very moving; using the idea that 7 billon people could fit in LA really drove home how massive earth is. When they were showing our population growth it seemed like the graph started to level off. Clearly technology was the reason for the expediential spike and as long as technology can keep up we will create sustainable solutions for everyone in the world.  The ideas are out there they just need to be put into the right hands, 

Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 20, 2013 3:01 PM


At the rate we are going we will hit 10 billion in no time because there are people in this world that have more than two kids. The ideal numbers of kid’s people have. There is one show that comes to mind is 19 kids and counting on TLC. They are a family of almost thirty living in one big house. The mother of the bunch is probably in her late 40's and is still having more kids as we speak she is probably pregnant with number 20. They should not have more kids because in no time they will run out of space and have to build a new house that could hold so much people. At the rate they are having kids the world is growing and growing population wise. The world can only hold so much people at a time. One good example is china and being a 3 billion people country and still growing day by day. 10 billion is a lot of people to take care of it will be twice as hard to maintain. There are more children being born than people dyeing. Population growth will affect everyone in regards to food supply and medicine wise.

 

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Geography is Key

This video is a class introduction to the Advanced Placement course in Human Geography, which is intended to give high-ability students the opportunity to ea...

 

This is an excellent promotional video for geography as a whole, but the AP Human Geography course specifically.  For more from this great Florida teacher, visit his course website at: http://teacherweb.ftl.pinecrest.edu/snyderd/APHG/ which has some incredible resources. 


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Kenzie Hohman's comment, September 11, 2012 6:13 PM
I liked how in this video it gave the viewer a preview of what you will learn in AP Human Geography. When I signed up for this class i thought I was going to have to memorize every country, its location and capital. This video let me really know what I was going to learn over this year.
John_Clark's comment, September 11, 2012 8:08 PM
This got me really excited to take this class. The music stirred somthing in me. I've always really enjoyed taking geography classes. And this, this was beautiful
Palyce Jeveron's comment, August 21, 2013 12:23 PM
Ive always been curious and eager to learn about various places in the world. In fact, one of my goals in life is to travel around the world to see what it has to offer and expierience new and different things from which im accustomed to. Watching this made me excited for class to begin, :)
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Countries Participating in the 2012 Olympic Games in London

Countries Participating in the 2012 Olympic Games in London | World Geography Education | Scoop.it
Discover the number of countries participating in the 2012 Summer Olympic Games in London. Find out which countries are not participating in the Olympic Games and learn which non-countries are participating as well.

 

204 countries are participating in the Olympics?  There aren't even 204 countries in the world!  This article looks at the political geography of international recognition.   One interesting case not discussed in the article is that of Taiwan.  Taiwan is participating, but marched under a non-Taiwanese flag under the name Chinese Taipei because the IOC wanted the mainland Chinese to return to the games. Also, South Sudan, Kosovo and the Vatican are not participating (although pondering them competing, especially the Vatican, is something that deeply amuses me).  Another intriguing thought: how many of the participants were former British colonies?   For classroom resources based on the Olympics, see: http://www.scoop.it/t/history-and-social-studies-education/p/2254468864/london-the-olympics-and-geography


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Emily Larsson's comment, August 26, 2013 6:08 PM
I love the Olympics! Its amazing how almost all of the countries in the world can come together for an event and forget about the conflicts they have back at home.
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Globalization

The world is becoming more and more interconnected. Globalization changes how people consume, work and live almost everywhere on the world. Today, many economic, political, cultural or ecological relationships are not explainable from a national perspective. At the same time, a controversial debate about the consequences of globalization has begun.

 

Questions to ponder: What are the driving forces behind globalization? What areas are most impacted by globalization?  How does globalization benefit some, and adversely impact others? Why?

 

Tags: Globalization, economic, industry, NGOs, political, scale, unit 6 industry.


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Kyle Toner's comment, September 10, 2012 9:31 AM
Globalization is an overall positive drive. In time globalization needs to mold developing countries who are in need of a better political and economical system
Sheyna Vargas's comment, September 10, 2012 10:16 AM
After watching this video, it is becoming clear that Globalization isn't just one-sided. While making it easier to connect with people all around the world and lowering costs for businesses, it is also causing harm to less developed countries. The question that pops into my head is, "Does the ends justify the means?" One could argue either point.
First, Globalization has made the world a "smaller" place. Not only is it easier to communicate with one another on different sides of the world but it’s also easier and cheaper to transport goods across nations and bodies of water. These are obviously benefits to both the developed countries and lesser developed countries in getting goods in timely fashions and producing jobs in both areas. Globalization also creates competition amongst developing nations to learn or advance in new skills to bring and/or keep jobs in their country/area.
On the other hand, Globalization is also wreaking havoc on cultural diversity around the global with Western music, food, and products becoming more available. Western culture is basically looked upon as the “money making” culture. Globalization, by creating competition is also harming local business in newly developing countries. This drives the prices down for the local businesses and makes them work for less.
Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, May 3, 2013 8:39 AM

Globalización Globalization

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100 People: A World Portrait

100 People: A World Portrait | World Geography Education | Scoop.it

This is the truly global project that asks the children of the world to introduce us to the people of the world.  We've seen videos and resources that ask the question, "if there were only 100 people in the world, what would it look like?"  This takes that idea of making demographic statistics more meaningful one step further by asking student in schools for around the world to nominate some "representative people" and share their stories.  The site houses videos, galleries from each continent and analyze themes that all societies must deal with.  This site that looks at the people and places on out planet to promote greater appreciation of cultural diversity and understanding is a great find. 

 

Tags: Worldwide, statistics, K12, education, comparison.


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Yagmur Pak's comment, April 21, 2013 3:42 AM
The 100 People Foundation is designed to sketch a portrayal of the world in terms of population and wealth distribution by representing the entire global neighborhood through stories and illustrations. This Foundation provides immense opportunities to help students acknowledge the global issues facing our planet and improve their abilities on examining statistics about the world population. As a pre-service teacher, I would use this website to engage my Stage 2 students in learning about the diversity around the world and raising their awareness about the issues that affect the planet we all share. Students can contribute to this world portrait by celebrating someone or something in their community (e.g. interviewing Indigenous people about the diversity within their community) through photography and writing about the specific information about their part of the world. Such an assignment has the prospective to commence a discussion of understanding of who we are and what position we occupy in the world. This HSIE assignment can also be linked to a Mathematics lesson in which students collect data from their local community in small groups where they have a look at the diversity of specific groups between communities. Teachers can provide students with a few variables in order to make the task challenging, but well supported. I believe, the 100 People Foundation is offering captivating and thought-provoking resources to expand children’s view of the world which may provide vast opportunities for students to “develop awareness of similarities and differences of beliefs and practices in various cultures, and learn to detect and avoid cultural stereotypes and prejudices” (Commonwealth of Australia, 2008, p.9).

Reference:
Commonwealth of Australia (2008). Global Perspectives: A framework for global education in Australian schools. Curriculum Corporation: Carlton South Vic.
ana boa-ventura's curator insight, June 27, 2013 11:31 PM

If you're looking at social media and diversity don't miss this site...In the last couple of years we've seen several sites / videos/ blogs rotating around the question 'if there were only 100 people in the world... ' In this case, children were asked to identify 'representative people' of that group of 100 and use visuals... many visuals.  And visuals of course bring up skin color, living conditions and much more. I don't want to be a spoiler though...Viist the site!

Canberra Girls Grammar GSSF's curator insight, September 1, 2013 7:43 PM

Year 7 Liveability Unit 2

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Global Closet Calculator

Global Closet Calculator | World Geography Education | Scoop.it

The Global Closet Calculator aggregates the contents of your closet by origin to generate a map showing your unique global footprint, and puts you in charge of the global journey your stuff takes to get to you.

 

As I've worked now with the Rhode Island Geography Education Alliance, I've had the good fortune to interact with the folks at National Geographic.  They are preparing for Geography Awareness Week (Nov 11-17th) with the theme "Declare your Interdependence!"  This newly released interactive feature allows students of all ages to see the global interconnections in their lives.   By analyzing the items in our closets (or any of the items that we consume), we can easily see that  our own personal geographies create a web of global interconnectedness.

 

Tags: NationalGeographic, GeographyEducation, K12, consumption, globalization. 


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The True Size Of Africa

The True Size Of Africa | World Geography Education | Scoop.it

This is another old classic image that I might have shared earlier but it merits repeating. As Salvatore Natoli (a leader in geography education) once said, "In our society we unconsciously equate size with importance and even power." This is one reason why many people have underestimated the true size of Africa relative to places that they view as more important or more powerful.


Tags: mapping, Africa, perspective, images. 


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Ricardo Salaya Monsell's comment, November 5, 2012 10:31 AM
Although I do not think they do to "trick", it is true that confuses many people and makes them believe in a world disproportionate. (Apologies for my terrible google-English)
Laurence Cuffe's curator insight, August 1, 2013 1:46 AM

While size is not every thing, and Ireland seems to have returned to the UK, This is an image worth discusing in Class.

Afrikasources's curator insight, January 15, 7:10 AM

Just a reminder

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Africa Next

Africa Next | World Geography Education | Scoop.it
For the first time in generations, more investment than foreign aid is pouring into Africa. But is that growth enough to change its future?

 

This is the first article in six-part series designed to investigate the changing economic and developmental possibilities that are facing the African continent.  As more foreign investors are exploring potential windfalls in Africa, it is making places that were on the margins of a global economy more directly tied to the process of globalization. 

 

Tags: Africa, development, globalization, economic, NGOs, unit 6 industry. 


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Rich's comment, September 24, 2012 11:12 AM
So why is it that only one village has been recieving funding and jobs while the other is being left in the dust (almost literally) with barely any water? It is no wonder why the village that is getting left behind is resistant to the change, they have recieved nothing in return compared to the others who are recieving funding aswell as jobs. This company is endangering the lives of those people, they are poor enough as it is without their food/water sources.
Victoria Morgia Jamolod-Umbo's comment, September 27, 2012 6:01 AM
Africa is a rich country with so many problems. If you consider the fact how rich is Africa when it comes to their natural resources, then you will realize that there is a deeper problem. The investments that are pouring into Africa, hopefully will solve a lot of problems. God save Africa!
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The World of 7 Billion - National Geographic Magazine

The World of 7 Billion - National Geographic Magazine | World Geography Education | Scoop.it

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Role of U.S. Airports in Epidemics

Public health crises of the past decade — such as the 2003 SARS outbreak, which spread to 37 countries and caused about 1,000 deaths, and the 2009 H1N1 flu p...

 

The spread of infectious diseases is inherently connected to the mobility of infected.  Airports are important nodes in this complex transportation network.  Which airports would have the greatest potential to spread diseases?  At MIT, they've gathered data that incorporates variations in travel patterns among individuals, the geographic locations of airports, the disparity in interactions among airports, and waiting times at individual airports to create a tool that could be used to predict where and how fast a disease might spread.  To read more, see: http://cee.mit.edu/news/releases/2012/airport-disease-contagion-model


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Urban Visions in Music Videos

Music video by Counting Crows performing Big Yellow Taxi. (C) 2002 Interscope Geffen (A&M) Records A Division of UMG Recordings Inc.

 

This music video is a vivid portrayal of the cultural power of place and the deep emotional connection many people have to their neighborhoods.  What types of urban geographies are being critiqued by the original lyrics (orginally performed and written my Joni Mitchell) of this song?  What do the images portrayed in the video say to further this critique?  What type of urbanism are these performers advocating?  Given the context of this video, what priorities do you think city planners should consider when building and reshaping cities? 


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Roland Trudeau Jr.'s comment, July 30, 2012 8:52 AM
They are very much concerned with losing their history. Everything they knew when they were growing up is going to be transformed into a slab of concrete. I can certainly empathise with them, it must be extremely sad to see your childhood disapear. I forget the name of the comedian, but his routine involved a rant on parking lots being the most useless construct we could have ever come up with. An area you travel to just to go somewhere else.
Don Brown Jr's comment, July 30, 2012 8:17 PM
I never though about a parking space like that before. However when it comes to gentrification, how can you find a balance between the values of a local community and the needs of the larger society?