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Rescooped by Stephanie Schrull from Wekiva AP Human Geography
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Seeing Landmarks From Far Away Might Shatter Your Perception Of Them

Seeing Landmarks From Far Away Might Shatter Your Perception Of Them | World Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
“ Wow. I guess it's true when they say not everything is as it appears...”
Via Seth Dixon, Kara Charboneau
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Rescooped by Stephanie Schrull from AP Human Geography Herm
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My escape from North Korea

My escape from North Korea | World Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
“ As a child growing up in North Korea, Hyeonseo Lee thought her country was “the best on the planet.” It wasn't until the famine of the 90s that she began to wonder. She escaped the country at 14, to begin a life in hiding, as a refugee in China. Hers is a harrowing, personal tale of survival and hope -- and a powerful reminder of those who face constant danger, even when the border is far behind.”
Via Allison Anthony
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Rescooped by Stephanie Schrull from Geography Education
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"Natural" Foods?

"The False Advertising Industry reveals the shocking truth about what is allowed in 'Natural' food. Only the USDA Organic Seal guarantees your food contains no Genetically Modified Organisms, no toxic pesticides, and no growth hormones or antibiotics."
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Rescooped by Stephanie Schrull from Regional Geography
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Nationalism at Global Events

Nationalism at Global Events | World Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

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Rescooped by Stephanie Schrull from Geography Education
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Shanghai Warms Up To A New Cuisine: Chinese Food, American-Style

Shanghai Warms Up To A New Cuisine: Chinese Food, American-Style | World Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
“At a new restaurant, expats find a taste of home and locals try foreign treats like fortune cookies.”Imagine living in China and missing Chinese food. It happens. American expatriates who grew up with popular takeout dishes like General Tso's chicken can't find it in China because it essentially doesn't exist here. Much of the Chinese food we grew up with isn't really Chinese. It's an American version of Chinese food. Chinese immigrants created it over time, adapting recipes with U.S. ingredients to appeal to American palates. Now, Americans living in Shanghai can get a fix of their beloved Chinatown cuisine at a new restaurant.
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Rescooped by Stephanie Schrull from Fantastic Maps
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Earth in Reverse

Earth in Reverse | World Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

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Rescooped by Stephanie Schrull from Geography Education
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The 20 year history of NAFTA

The 20 year history of NAFTA | World Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
“In the 20 years since it entered into force, the North American Free Trade Agreement has been both lauded and attacked in the United States. But to properly assess NAFTA’s record, it is important to first be clear about what the agreement has actually done. Economically speaking, the answer is a lot.”NAFTA was the first comprehensive free-trade agreement to join developed and developing nations, and it achieved broader and deeper market openings than any trade agreement had before.NAFTA did that by eliminating tariffs on all industrial goods, guaranteeing unrestricted agricultural trade between the United States and Mexico, opening up a broad range of service sectors, and instituting national treatment for cross-border service providers. It also set high standards of protection for patents, trademarks, copyrights, and trade secrets.NAFTA ignited an explosion in cross-border economic activity. Today, Canada ranks as the United States’ largest single export market, and it sends 98 percent of its total energy exports to the United States, making Canada the United States’ largest supplier of energy products and services. Mexico is the United States’ second-largest single export market. Over the past two decades, a highly efficient and integrated supply chain has developed among the three North American economies. Intraregional trade flows have increased by roughly 400 percent.North Americans not only sell more things to one another; they also make more things together. About half of U.S. trade with Canada and Mexico takes place between related companies, and the resulting specialization has boosted productivity in all three economies. NAFTA has also caused cross-border investment to soar.In spite of this impressive economic record, NAFTA has its critics. Most of those who attack it on economic grounds focus on Mexico, not Canada, and claim that the partnership is one-sided: that NAFTA is Mexico’s gain and America’s pain. But the economic data prove otherwise.
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Rescooped by Stephanie Schrull from Geography Education
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Muslim Woman Discovers Friendly New World When a Winter Scarf Covers Her Hijab

Muslim Woman Discovers Friendly New World When a Winter Scarf Covers Her Hijab | World Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
“Chicago's bitter cold temps led to an impromptu social experiment when Leena Suleiman bundled up in a knit scarf and cap.”
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Rescooped by Stephanie Schrull from Social Media Classroom
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The Best Teachers Don't Do What They're Told

The Best Teachers Don't Do What They're Told | World Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
"In some of the schools and districts I work with now, it’s really pretty depressing how many teachers just want to be told what to do. It’s not that they don’t care–it’s just a human defense mechanism kicking in. An insecurity of their own that’s tired of reaching and having their hand slapped, so they don’t.They’ve learned to do what they’re told–they start with “district expectations” and work backwards from there. We toss around fun phrases like “team-player” to normalize this hurtful fascination education has with alignment and standardization. But by the time teachers turn policy and expectation and standards and curriculum maps into units, lessons and activities that actually reach the students, the zest for teaching and learning is barely recognizable.
And both approaches are wrong. Me for trying to fit it all in, and those that refuse to try and resign to being a mirror for “district policy” and “state-led initiatives.”
I do realize that, on paper, there’s no reason a teacher can’t do what they’re told and be amazing, but think for a moment about the best teachers you know. Do they do what they’re told, or do they simply do what needs to be done and navigate any fallout better than everyone else?"
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Student cardboard map project

Student cardboard map project | World Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
"A student-made, 3-D, cardboard U.S. Population map at my University’s art gallery."
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Rescooped by Stephanie Schrull from Geography Education
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How Vietnam became a coffee giant

How Vietnam became a coffee giant | World Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
"Think of coffee and you will probably think of Brazil, Colombia, or maybe Ethiopia. But the world's second largest exporter today is Vietnam. How did its market share jump from 0.1% to 20% in just 30 years, and how has this rapid change affected the country?"
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Map: 'How Much Snow It Typically Takes to Cancel School in the U.S.'

Map: 'How Much Snow It Typically Takes to Cancel School in the U.S.' | World Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
“The geography of the snow day, courtesy of Reddit user atrubetskoy”
Via Seth Dixon
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Rescooped by Stephanie Schrull from Geography Education
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GMO-Free Europe

GMO-Free Europe | World Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it

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Rescooped by Stephanie Schrull from Geography Education
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Geopolitics and the New World Order

Geopolitics and the New World Order | World Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
“Geography increasingly fuels endless chaos and old-school conflicts in the 21st Century.”
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Rescooped by Stephanie Schrull from Geography Education
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World of Change

World of Change | World Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
"Earth is constantly changing. Some changes are a natural part of the climate system, such as the seasonal expansion and contraction of the Arctic sea ice pack. The responsibility for other changes, such as the Antarctic ozone hole, falls squarely on humanity’s shoulders. Our World of Change series documents how our planet’s land, oceans, atmosphere, and Sun are changing over time."
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Rescooped by Stephanie Schrull from AP Human Geography Herm
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Infant Mortality Rates

Infant Mortality Rates | World Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
“ Are All Mothers Created Equal? From the State of the World's Mothers 2012 report see how mothers locations have an impact on the life and death of their children.”
Via Seth Dixon, Allison Anthony
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Rescooped by Stephanie Schrull from Geography Education
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China and Taiwan

China and Taiwan | World Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
“Will China win its 65-year war with Taiwan -- without firing a shot?”
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Rescooped by Stephanie Schrull from AP Human Geography Herm
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One Infographic You’ll Want To Take To The Grocery Store And Tape To Your Fridge

One Infographic You’ll Want To Take To The Grocery Store And Tape To Your Fridge | World Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
Things that matter. Pass 'em on.
Via Allison Anthony
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Rescooped by Stephanie Schrull from AP Human Geography Herm
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Why Gentrification Is So Hard to Stop

Why Gentrification Is  So Hard to Stop | World Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
“ Gentrification isn't new -- it's actually baked into the economic forces that have been driving urban development since the 1950s.”
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Rescooped by Stephanie Schrull from AP Human Geography Herm
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How a dialect differs from a language

How a dialect differs from a language | World Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
HONG KONG'S education department caused a furore last month by briefly posting on its website the claim that Cantonese was “not an official language” of...
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Rescooped by Stephanie Schrull from Geography Education
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Issues with Ukrainian Nationalism

Issues with Ukrainian Nationalism | World Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
"Images of toppled statues notwithstanding, 'revolution' has never been the right word to describe recent events in Kiev. Ukraine, after all, has been here before. At the heart of the country’s present struggle is its resistance to any 'strategic partnership' with Russia and its understanding of Europe as a potential economic and political savior from corrupt government. But the tensions between East and West -- both psychological and geographic -- are deeply rooted in Ukraine's national identity. Those Ukrainians most concerned about their country’s future would do well to recognize that identity’s inherent fragility. The original generation of Ukrainian nationalists suffered precisely for their failure to do so."
Via Seth Dixon
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Rescooped by Stephanie Schrull from FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY
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The Growth of Megacities

The Growth of Megacities | World Geography in the classroom | Scoop.it
"For the first time in human history, more of the world’s 6.8 billion people live in cities than in rural areas. That is an incredible demographic and geographic shift since 1950 when only 30 percent of the world’s 2.5 billion inhabitants lived in urban environments. The world’s largest cities, particularly in developing countries, are growing at phenomenal rates. As a growing landless class is attracted by urban opportunities, meager as they might be, these cities’ populations are ballooning to incredible numbers. A May 2010 Christian Science Monitor article on “megacities” predicted that by 2050, almost 70 percent of the world’s estimated 10 billion people—more than the number of people living today—will reside in urban areas. The social, economic and environmental problems associated with a predominantly urbanized population are considerably different from those of the mostly rural world population of the past."
Via Seth Dixon, FCHSAPGEO
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Rescooped by Stephanie Schrull from FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY
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Will saving poor children lead to overpopulation?

“ Hans Rosling explains a very common misunderstanding about the world. CC by www.gapminder.org
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Rescooped by Stephanie Schrull from Social Media Classroom
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Did You Know 3.0

“The New 2012 HD version on the progression of information technology researched by Karl Fisch, and modified by me! Globalization & The Information Age.”
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Rescooped by Stephanie Schrull from Geography Education
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Pangaea and Plate Tectonics

The supercontinent Pangaea, with its connected South America and Africa, broke apart 200 million years ago. But the continents haven't stopped shifting -- the tectonic plates beneath our feet (in Earth's two top layers, the lithosphere and the asthenosphere) are still traveling at about the rate your fingernails grow. Michael Molina discusses the catalysts and consequences of continental drift.
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