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Local Population Pyramids

Local Population Pyramids | World Geography | Scoop.it

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Mrs. Karnowski's curator insight, August 27, 2014 7:13 AM

1G Theme 2: 6 Billion people and me

CT Blake's curator insight, August 29, 2014 8:27 PM

Useful for explaining population pyramids.

Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 16, 2014 12:08 PM

Unit 2

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Interactives about Syrian Refugee Crisis

Interactives about Syrian Refugee Crisis | World Geography | Scoop.it
War, sectarian violence, and famine have forced more than 50 million people from their homes—the largest number of displaced people since World War II.

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Jukka Melaranta's curator insight, March 3, 10:40 AM

Here are two excellent ESRI StoryMaps about the Syrian refugee crisis; these are two very good examples of a great web maps. 

 

Tags: GIS, ESRI, mapping, cartography, geospatial, edtech, Syria, political, refugees.

malbert's curator insight, March 4, 1:30 AM

Here are two excellent ESRI StoryMaps about the Syrian refugee crisis; these are two very good examples of a great web maps. 

'The Uprooted' (focused more on Syria).
Epicenter of a Deepening Refugee Crisis (puts Syria into larger global patterns).

 

Tags: GIS, ESRI, mapping, cartography, geospatial, edtech, Syria, political, refugees.

Rachel Stutzman's curator insight, March 11, 10:28 AM

Here are two excellent ESRI StoryMaps about the Syrian refugee crisis; these are two very good examples of a great web maps. 

'The Uprooted' (focused more on Syria).
Epicenter of a Deepening Refugee Crisis (puts Syria into larger global patterns).

 

Tags: GIS, ESRI, mapping, cartography, geospatial, edtech, Syria, political, refugees.

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How the states voted in every presidential election

The citizens of the United States have elected 44 presidents in 57 elections since the Constitution was adopted in 1789. Since the Civil War, presidential contests have been dominated by America's two major political parties – the Republicans and the Democrats. But over the last 150 years, state allegiance to these two parties has shifted greatly. Watch to see how the states voted in every presidential election since 1860.

 

Tags: electoral, mapping.


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China to end one-child policy

China to end one-child policy | World Geography | Scoop.it

"All couples will now be allowed to have two children, the state-run news agency said, citing a statement from the Communist Party. The controversial policy was introduced nationally in 1979, to reduce the country's birth rate and slow the population growth rate. However, concerns at China's aging population led to pressure for change."


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Gene Gagne's curator insight, December 1, 2015 7:37 PM

Lets not forget the expansion of china also with its economic strength and its military strength which is a threat to other countries in the area because china can take control and with Chinese moving into Africa and United states as residents china is going to need to populate its own country.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 8:55 PM

First implemented in 1979 and diminished in 2013 It is good to hear something like this has finally come to an end. Although it deemed successful by stopping the birth of an estimated 400 million babies, there were some places that allowed two children in rural areas if the first was a girl. It is assumed though that even though this is no longer a required policy, many couples may only have one child since it is accepted as a social norm. 

Patty B's curator insight, April 29, 12:31 PM
This was, of course, massive news coming out of China. It is something that needed to be done, at least from the Chinese's standpoint. But this is also an important issue to the entire world. First and foremost, this article ties into the fact that the world's population reached 7 billion within the past couple of years and is continuing to rise. It ties into the fact that the human population is quickly approaching its maximum capacity. While China's new policy may or may not speed up the world population by any amount that will truly matter, any news related to global population at this point in time is a hot topic. But this policy was implemented to reverse some serious issues that have arisen in China as a result of its one-child policy. It's population is made up with a majority of retirement aged folk. China needs to ensure it has enough qualified working-aged people in the future and believe a two-child limit will aid in this happening. So of course China had many economic reasons for ending its one-child policy, but there are also certain social reasons for doing so I think. In a world where many human rights and civil rights issues have found their ways to the forefront of political and social discussions, China must have felt obligated to do something about the one-child policy to keep up with the wave of political correctness sweeping the globe. A one-child policy seemed extremely restrictive in a world that is becoming increasingly more apt to let people make decisions for themselves. 
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Long Toponyms

Liam Dutton nails pronouncing Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch

 

Known as Llanfairpwllgwyngyll, Llanfair PG and Llanfairpwll, the small community of 3,000 on the island of Anglesey has the longest single word toponym (place name) in Europe. The name means "Saint Mary's Church in a hollow of white hazel near the swirling whirlpool of the church of Saint Tysilio with a red cave."

The longest toponym in the world is a New Zealand hill named Taumatawhakatangihangakoauauotamateapokaiwhenuakitanatahu.

 

Tags:place, language, toponyms.


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Antonios Vitaliotis's curator insight, September 23, 2015 2:27 PM
After a few drinks...ask your friends to say: Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch
John Puchein's curator insight, November 6, 2015 7:40 AM

The city in this is featured in our text books. I know this guy practiced it for a while just to say it on TV! 

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Looking back at the Millennium Development Goals

"In which John examines the progress of the UN's Millennium Development Goals over the last 15 years and looks ahead to the Global Goals. Can we live in a world where extreme poverty and undernourishment are rare? Are we closer to gender equality? How have infant mortality rates and maternal mortality rates changed in the last 25 years? And how will we ensure that the astonishing progress since 1990 continues?"


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 24, 2015 1:11 PM

The world isn't perfect, but it is getting better.  The UN Millennium Goals were ambitious and overall have been a huge success (click here to see more from the Bill Gates videos the were referenced in the video above).  Today, world leaders are setting a new batch of developmental goals to work on for the next 15 years.  These Global Goals are even more ambitious and can give the global community direction and purpose.   


Tags: development, worldwide.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 25, 2015 12:42 PM

unit 6

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Looking back at the Millennium Development Goals

"In which John examines the progress of the UN's Millennium Development Goals over the last 15 years and looks ahead to the Global Goals. Can we live in a world where extreme poverty and undernourishment are rare? Are we closer to gender equality? How have infant mortality rates and maternal mortality rates changed in the last 25 years? And how will we ensure that the astonishing progress since 1990 continues?"


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 24, 2015 1:11 PM

The world isn't perfect, but it is getting better.  The UN Millennium Goals were ambitious and overall have been a huge success (click here to see more from the Bill Gates videos the were referenced in the video above).  Today, world leaders are setting a new batch of developmental goals to work on for the next 15 years.  These Global Goals are even more ambitious and can give the global community direction and purpose.   


Tags: development, worldwide.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 25, 2015 12:42 PM

unit 6

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Esri Story Map Treasure Hunt

Esri Story Map Treasure Hunt | World Geography | Scoop.it

Although these were designed specifically for GIS day during Geography Awareness Week, these 2 excellent map-based treasure hunts from ESRI are great any time of year.  The answer to the question will only pop up in you are zoomed in the the right region (SHIFT + Make a box = Zoom to area).  These links will take you to the World Cities quiz and also to the Mountains quiz.


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Raymond Dolloff's curator insight, September 9, 2015 2:31 PM

Best way to challenge your brain to become more familiar with where places are within the world. Ranging from the most populous area in the world to where a historic city is.

Hamza Amjad's curator insight, September 9, 2015 2:48 PM

Creative and fun way of learning about world geography!

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, September 9, 2015 2:52 PM

I enjoyed this exercise, it was fun and creative.

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Migrant and refugee crisis: War uproots 1 in 2 Syrians

Migrant and refugee crisis: War uproots 1 in 2 Syrians | World Geography | Scoop.it

"War has displaced half the people in Syria. Many are part of a larger migrant and refugee crisis in Europe." http://wp.me/P2dv5Z-1YS ;


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27 Facts About Maps

A weekly show where knowledge junkies get their fix of trivia-tastic information. This week, John shares 27 facts about maps.

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Ashley Burleson's curator insight, August 11, 2015 4:45 AM

This Mental Floss video is an entertaining rapid-fire hodgepodge of map trivia with some important educational content nicely nestled in there.  This 99 Percent Invisible podcast is another 'ode to maps,' but this one is more poetic about the value of cartography and personal in how it explores the qualities they possess.  Enjoy them both!  

Tags:  mapping, trivia, cartography.

Matt Davidson's curator insight, August 11, 2015 7:43 AM

Maps are awesome - need I say more! This clip actually covers a significant amount on the power / influence of maps through history.

Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, August 11, 2015 7:59 PM

Very USA centric but entertaining and makes you think about the taken-for- granted use of maps. We do believe them!!

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See where women outnumber men around the world (and why)

See where women outnumber men around the world (and why) | World Geography | Scoop.it

"A new study maps the population gaps between men and women around the world."

 


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Laura Lee Smith's comment, September 7, 2015 7:19 PM
This is actually something I discussed a while back with a friend of mine who is from Russia, how there is such a huge lack of marriageable men that women there consider being a mail order bride a good alternative to spinsterhood.
Laura Lee Smith's comment, September 7, 2015 7:19 PM
This is actually something I discussed a while back with a friend of mine who is from Russia, how there is such a huge lack of marriageable men that women there consider being a mail order bride a good alternative to spinsterhood.
Cohen Adkins's curator insight, September 8, 2015 4:59 PM

Its amazing how well balanced some countries are with the ratio of men to women how ever some of the 3rd world countries are off balance but not to an extreme.

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Understanding the Refugee Crisis in Europe, Syria, and around the World

"In which John Green discusses the Syrian refugee crisis and the growing number of refugees from Syria, Afghanistan, and Eritrea crossing the sea with the help of smugglers to seek refuge in European Union nations. Also discussed: The difference between migrants and refugees, the rights of refugees as established by international law, the globalization of all regional crises, and how the death of 3-year-old Alan Kurdi galvanized the world."  http://wp.me/P2dv5Z-1YS ;


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Burka Avenger is the Muslim Female Superhero We've All Been Waiting For

Burka Avenger is the Muslim Female Superhero We've All Been Waiting For | World Geography | Scoop.it

"The Muslim world doesn't have the best reputation when it comes to female empowerment. With a lack of of strong, independent female role models, young women in the region have few places to look in popular culture for guidance. Until now.

Meet Burka Avenger, the game-changing Pakistani cartoon that, for the first time, has flipped the status quo on its head with its female superhero protagonist, who fights crime in her magical burka."

 

Tags: Pakistan,  gender, popular culture, SouthAsia, globalization, culture, Islam.


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Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 2015 9:05 AM

This superhero is more than just something to bring joy to children in Pakistan. This hero empowers women to think they can be strong like the Burka Avenger.

Chris Costa's curator insight, November 30, 2015 9:51 AM

This is an awesome, heartwarming story, and I highly recommend people to watch the trailer for the show offered on the website- it seems very cool, and like something kids will actually want to watch (unlike a great deal of educational television). For a nation that is plagued by such a great deal of bigotry and gender inequality- with female infant mortality rates contributing to a gender distribution of 108 men to 100 women- it is so good to see a program such as this being released from Pakistan. Young Muslim women are so deprived of positive and powerful female role models, allowing for the continued systematic abuse and mistreatment of women in many parts of the Middle East, including Pakistan. This show looks promising, from both a critical and humanitarian perspective, although I fear for the lives of its creators and that its showing will be suppressed in the very nations that need it the most. Terrorist organizations and religious extremists fear education and empowerment more than any army, as only those two factors can truly combat these movements effectively, and they will show no mercy should they ever be given the chance to cease the production of this program. I applaud its creators for their bravery, and hope that they are able to get their message across.

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Mapping Density in the U.S.

Mapping Density in the U.S. | World Geography | Scoop.it
Population density in the US varies wildly from place to place.

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Bridgitte's curator insight, March 2, 9:22 AM

I thought I shared this map or something very similiar a while back in 2013 when it was widely being shared but I couldn't find it.  Many countries have highly concentrated population distributions (like Canada and Australia) and the United States has pockets of extreme density interspersed throughout the country.  On the flip side, vast swaths of the countries are considered empty in terms of population such as this map that shows 1% of the total U.S. population in 42% of the area. and this one of the world that shows uneven patterns.

 

Tags: population, density, mapping, visualization.

Jacob Clauson's curator insight, March 3, 8:31 AM

I thought I shared this map or something very similiar a while back in 2013 when it was widely being shared but I couldn't find it.  Many countries have highly concentrated population distributions (like Canada and Australia) and the United States has pockets of extreme density interspersed throughout the country.  On the flip side, vast swaths of the countries are considered empty in terms of population such as this map that shows 1% of the total U.S. population in 42% of the area. and this one of the world that shows uneven patterns.

 

Tags: population, density, mapping, visualization.

Dewayne Goad's curator insight, March 9, 9:42 AM

I thought I shared this map or something very similiar a while back in 2013 when it was widely being shared but I couldn't find it.  Many countries have highly concentrated population distributions (like Canada and Australia) and the United States has pockets of extreme density interspersed throughout the country.  On the flip side, vast swaths of the countries are considered empty in terms of population such as this map that shows 1% of the total U.S. population in 42% of the area. and this one of the world that shows uneven patterns.

 

Tags: population, density, mapping, visualization.

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Opinion: Sadly, Malthus was right. Now what?

Opinion: Sadly, Malthus was right. Now what? | World Geography | Scoop.it
We seem bound to learn the hard way that there really is a limit to how many people the Earth can support.

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Ivan Ius's curator insight, February 26, 8:23 AM

Well stated!

From Seth Dixon - His insight:

The ideas of Thomas Malthus have always loomed large; the scope includes some of the biggest issues facing humanity's continued existence on this planet.  His controversial ideas have been debated for centuries and the way we frame the debate is oftentimes in terms that are derived from Malthusian ideas (for example the terms overpopulation, carrying capacity, and sustainability).  This op-ed written by the President of the Canada's Population institute provides a way to get student to assess the strengths of an argument and to identify the bias/perspective of the author.  

 

Questions to Ponder: What did Malthus get right?  What did he get wrong? 

 

Tags: Demographics, population, APHG, unit 2 population. 

Deanna Metz's curator insight, March 1, 8:01 PM

The ideas of Thomas Malthus have always loomed large; the scope includes some of the biggest issues facing humanity's continued existence on this planet.  His controversial ideas have been debated for centuries and the way we frame the debate is oftentimes in terms that are derived from Malthusian ideas (for example the terms overpopulation, carrying capacity, and sustainability).  This op-ed written by the President of the Canada's Population institute provides a way to get student to assess the strengths of an argument and to identify the bias/perspective of the author.  


Questions to Ponder: What did Malthus get right?  What did he get wrong? 


Tags: Demographics, population, APHG, unit 2 population. 

Danielle Yen's curator insight, March 10, 9:23 AM

The ideas of Thomas Malthus have always loomed large; the scope includes some of the biggest issues facing humanity's continued existence on this planet.  His controversial ideas have been debated for centuries and the way we frame the debate is oftentimes in terms that are derived from Malthusian ideas (for example the terms overpopulation, carrying capacity, and sustainability).  This op-ed written by the President of the Canada's Population institute provides a way to get student to assess the strengths of an argument and to identify the bias/perspective of the author.  

 

Questions to Ponder: What did Malthus get right?  What did he get wrong? 

 

Tags: Demographics, population, APHG, unit 2 population. 

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ISIS: A New Threat

ISIS: A New Threat | World Geography | Scoop.it

In this lesson, students will:

Explore the role of ISIS in the Middle EastInterpret political cartoons on the U.S. response to ISISIdentify the techniques used by cartoonists to express political opinionMonitor the news media coverage of ISIS over time
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 20, 2015 12:29 PM

The Choices Program produces some great materials and this is from their Teaching with the News series.  The newest in the series is a resource guide for the terrorist attacks in Paris.  


Tags:  political, terrorism, conflict, geopolitics, ISIS, Choices.

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, November 27, 2015 4:32 PM

Guerras

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EU plans 1.8 bn euro fund to curb African migrants

EU plans 1.8 bn euro fund to curb African migrants | World Geography | Scoop.it

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Allison Anthony's curator insight, October 29, 2015 7:20 AM

Another EU response to the migration crisis 

Alex Vielman's curator insight, November 16, 2015 1:00 PM

The EU is planning to spend over a billion dollars in order to help curb the influx of desperate migrants from Africa seeking a better life in Europe. Most of the refugees flooding into Europe are fleeing war in Syria but waves of so-called economic migrants from many other countries have joined the flow. Most of these immigrants do not feel safe in there countries which is the reason for there immigration. The war in Syria affects everyone in the world especially, to those countries surrounding it. The EU nations to relocate 160,000 refugees as part of efforts to help overwhelmed front-line states such as Greece, Italy and Hungary. Its important to understand which countries are willing to help and which aren't.

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"Why don't we just bomb them?"

"Why don't we just bomb them?" | World Geography | Scoop.it

"The west’s failure has already fueled Syria’s dirty war. Now it needs to address how we got here, the endgame, the legality and the global implications before it asks for permission to shoot."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 21, 2015 5:11 PM

I think we've all heard someone say something along the lines of "why doesn't someone just take them out/bomb them?" about ISIS or Syria's leader, Bashar al-Assad.  As is often the case, it's not that simple to remove a thorn as actions can have reverberating consequences.  Here are three articles to consider when discussing the merits/feasibility of military intervention in Syria:


TagsSyria, war, conflict, political, geopolitics.

Matthew Richmond's curator insight, November 4, 2015 7:20 PM

Every time I hear this mentioned, whether right or wrong, I instantly assume that I know something about their education level. This situation is going from worse to even worse, and the involvement of the world's "leaders" isn't going to help at all. This is an internal problem that needs to fixed internally. Any involvement will just lead to more pointless deaths of American soldiers. It is time for the Arab nations to get together and take out their own garbage. After all, idea's are bulletproof.

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Syria: Epicenter of a Deepening Refugee Crisis

Syria: Epicenter of a Deepening Refugee Crisis | World Geography | Scoop.it
Thousands of refugees, many of them fleeing the brutal conflict in Syria, are streaming across Europe in search of safety and security.

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Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, September 30, 2015 7:29 AM

Syrian refugees

Emma Boyle's curator insight, October 2, 2015 1:58 PM

For your debate research.

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, November 23, 2015 11:42 AM

This story map is a great visual of the current refugee crisis. This would be a helpful aid in describing the geographical barriers refugees face and how it affects them. For example the map shows where highest concentrations of deaths occur, naturally it is in the ocean. The ocean is a barrier for fleeing refugees. Think about how different landscapes and land forms can affect refugees available paths to flee

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The World’s Congested Human Migration Routes in 5 Maps

The World’s Congested Human Migration Routes in 5 Maps | World Geography | Scoop.it

"The desperate men, women, and children flooding into Europe from the Middle East and Africa are not the only people moving along ever-shifting and dangerous migration routes. Last year saw the highest levels of global forced displacement on record—59.5 million individuals left their homes in 2014 due to 'persecution, conflict, generalized violence, or human rights violations' according to the United Nations. That's 8.3 million more people than the year before."


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PSC AS Geography's curator insight, September 21, 2015 8:30 AM

Excellent links here to the population movement and global shift of people moving from 'Switched Off' to 'Switched On' and from developing to developed regions of Europe and North America.

Matthieu CLEMENT's curator insight, September 25, 2015 12:25 AM

Pour compléter et prolonger un petit peu notre dossier sur la crise des réfugiés en Europe. A analyser  une série de cartes dans l'article aux différentes échelles régionales.

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, October 1, 2015 4:14 AM

The World’s Congested Human Migration Routes in 5 Maps

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Hungary’s response to the migrant crisis? A 109-mile-long, 13-foot-tall fence

Hungary’s response to the migrant crisis? A 109-mile-long, 13-foot-tall fence | World Geography | Scoop.it
Those on the other side of the fence are not so happy.

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Alex Vielman's curator insight, October 15, 2015 4:33 PM

Sometimes we forget to realize that the same situations occurring in our living region, could be the same ones other regions are dealing around the world. We all think about the fence placed (or going to be placed) on the U.S.-Mexican border, and we would never think to believe European countries are dealing with the same migration problem. The government of Hungary is preparing to build a 13-foot-fence along its 109-mile border with Serbia. This year alone, there have been 50,000 immigrants entering the nation. One of the big reasons of the wall is biggest of the large entering immigrants, and the fact that Serbia is not part of the European Union.

The cult of the European Union is a culture and the way the article plays out is almost like all other countries not in the Union, are below the ones who are. I don't believe building walls/fencing is the solution knowing that over half of the immigrants entering the U.S. arrive by plane due to given visas, who simply overstay there welcome. The building a fence is huge world phenomena at the moment around the world.

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GeoGuessr - Let's explore the world!

GeoGuessr - Let's explore the world! | World Geography | Scoop.it
GeoGuessr is a geography game which takes you on a journey around the world and challenges your ability to recognize your surroundings.

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Linda Denty's curator insight, August 9, 2015 7:33 PM

I've shared GeoGuessr before but they now have country-specific quizzes (this is for the United States).  When I was a child I used to wonder if woke up somewhere far from home, would I be able to know where I was just by looking at the places around me (I was a geo-geek from way back when).  GeoGuessr is the closest thing to finding yourself lost in the world and needing to figure out where you are without being wisked away.  GeoGuessr will display 5 locations in GoogleMaps "StreetView" and you have to guess where the images are located.  You can pan and zoom in the StreetView to explore the landscape and find more context clues as to where that location is.  It is a fantastic exploration exercise.   

 

Tags: landscape, place, trivia.

Marianne Naughton's curator insight, August 9, 2015 7:59 PM

I've shared GeoGuessr before but they now have country-specific quizzes (this is for the United States).  When I was a child I used to wonder if woke up somewhere far from home, would I be able to know where I was just by looking at the places around me (I was a geo-geek from way back when).  GeoGuessr is the closest thing to finding yourself lost in the world and needing to figure out where you are without being wisked away.  GeoGuessr will display 5 locations in GoogleMaps "StreetView" and you have to guess where the images are located.  You can pan and zoom in the StreetView to explore the landscape and find more context clues as to where that location is.  It is a fantastic exploration exercise.   


Tags: landscape, place, trivia.

Sanda Craina's curator insight, August 10, 2015 1:11 PM

I've shared GeoGuessr before but they now have country-specific quizzes (this is for the United States).  When I was a child I used to wonder if woke up somewhere far from home, would I be able to know where I was just by looking at the places around me (I was a geo-geek from way back when).  GeoGuessr is the closest thing to finding yourself lost in the world and needing to figure out where you are without being wisked away.  GeoGuessr will display 5 locations in GoogleMaps "StreetView" and you have to guess where the images are located.  You can pan and zoom in the StreetView to explore the landscape and find more context clues as to where that location is.  It is a fantastic exploration exercise.   

 

Tags: landscape, place, trivia.

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Quiz: Can you find these 15 U.S. foreign-policy hot spots?

Quiz: Can you find these 15 U.S. foreign-policy hot spots? | World Geography | Scoop.it
We hear the names of these places in the news constantly, but can you actually locate them on a map?

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 23, 2015 10:41 PM

I do enjoy a good current events map quiz.  Yes, geography is about more than just locating things on the map, but that is still a pretty foundational spatial-thinking skill to build upon. You can zoom it to place the points, but this is a very hard quiz that is not for novices (if you can get more than 130 points, you'll earn the title geo-champ).  If you want some more quizzes with perhaps more direct applicability in the classroom, click here for online regional quizzes.         


Tags: political, geopolitics, fun, trivia.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, August 24, 2015 2:10 PM

locational geography test your knowledge and challenge yourself!

Michael MacNeil's curator insight, August 25, 2015 1:47 PM

Hard to do especially on Mobil phone map

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Teaching about Syrian Refugees

Teaching about Syrian Refugees | World Geography | Scoop.it
The Syrian Civil War that stemmed out of the Arab Spring in 2012 morphed into a conflict unlike any of the other Arab Spring protests. In the years before the Arab Spring, Syria experienced an extended drought led to declining agricultural production and social discontent even before the spark of revolutionary change swept the region. The rise of ISIS in the power struggle has led to horrifying atrocities that leave ordinary citizens seeking the most basic of human needs: safety, shelter, food and water.

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Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, September 17, 2015 9:40 AM
 Syrian Refugees
Gene Gagne's curator insight, November 4, 2015 4:40 PM

Its amazing how a civil war sparked a total of 11 million refugees or displacement up to date. Turkey, Iraq, Jordan, are a major help in providing space for these refugees.

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, December 7, 2015 2:08 PM

The conflict in Syria that stemmed from the Arab Spring led to many refugees fleeing to escape the horrible political condition. These people are different from migrants because they have no choice but to leave. According to UN laws they are provided necessary aid and a place to stay until their country is safe again. However, the Syrian War is escalating quickly rather than showing any sign of stopping. It may be possible these refugees will not have a home and will be an ethnic minority in host countries. 

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The Individual and the Global

"Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it's the only thing that ever has." --Maragret Mead


Via Seth Dixon
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Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, May 1, 2015 3:55 PM

I love the notion and sometimes agree with this idea.  But at the same time it has to be sustained by the people.  It's this exciting idea to be a part of something, but that wears off quickly for a lot of people.  Then they are on to the next thing.  It would be nice if everyone would pick one cause and stay with it for atleast a year.  Maybe make this your New Years Resolution instead of hitting the gym.  

SNMinc WebGems's curator insight, May 8, 2015 5:16 AM

The unique power of one...

Avery Liardon's curator insight, May 20, 2015 10:43 AM

Very intriguing way to summarize the world and wrap up human geography. Reminds me of the pale blue dot speech, and really captures the big idea of how people and geography shape the world we live in.

Rescooped by Mary Klinger from Geography Education
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Syrian Journey: Choose your own route

Syrian Journey: Choose your own route | World Geography | Scoop.it
Put yourself in the shoes of a Syrian migrant and see whether you could make the right choices on the journey to Europe.

Via Seth Dixon
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Norka McAlister's curator insight, April 5, 2015 8:01 PM

Citizens of Syria have experienced difficult times since their country entered into a period of continual war in the past few decades. People migrate to Europe in demand of better life for their families. All begin with a plan and a &helper,&  called trafficker or coyote in Mexico, and money to cross few borders and be able to live life free from war. Although, with countries such as Egypt, Lybia, Lebanon, Turkey, and Greece, with a massive migrations, tough economies, lack of jobs, nothing and no one is safe. However, Europe is very attractive in terms of quality life and safety to raise families. Furthermore, to be able to survive during this migration transition, many risks are involved and even in some cases, killings. Immigrants migrate by boat, truck, train, and sometimes even walking. Day or night immigrants keep moving and pay  high prices to be transported to the next point. It takes them weeks, months, and even years to reach thier final destinations. This is the same for those immigrants in Mexico and U.S. 

Claire Law's curator insight, April 25, 2015 8:41 PM

UK interactive resource to put students in the shoes of refugees fleeing conflict

zane alan berger's curator insight, May 26, 2015 4:42 PM

this is a virtual stimulator showing the struggle of a Syrian migrant, proving that one risky decision can be detrimental for these people. this can be related to the migration unit